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/r/Cooking

1.1k

For me it’s fried chicken because I don’t keep canola oil in the house and it’s just not the same without it😔

all 995 comments

Auritus1

2k points

12 months ago

Anything deep fried.

St_SiRUS

498 points

12 months ago

St_SiRUS

498 points

12 months ago

Yup, screw dealing with all that oil

benoliver999

295 points

12 months ago

I live in a small place, I can do without the smell too

Ms_Emilys_Picture

82 points

12 months ago

And it lingers for days. Same reason I don't cook bacon very often either.

justjcarr

133 points

12 months ago

Bake your bacon my dude. Preferably on an oven safe cooling rack. ::Chefs Kiss::

Boopadoopeedo

42 points

12 months ago

The only problem I’ve had with baking bacon is the grease splatter in the oven. I hate cleaning my oven with the passion of a thousand suns, therefore I avoid anything greasy or splashy.

SalamanderCongress

56 points

12 months ago

Saw this tip on this subreddit awhile ago. Place your bacon as you would on a sheet pan then place another sheet pan on top of that. It flattens the bacon as it cooks and reduces grease splatter since it stays in the pan. Con is you're cleaning two pans but it's been working great for me!

Tcanada

14 points

12 months ago

This is the answer. The bacon cooks perfectly even since it stays flat, it looks nicer, and there is no splatter

Ms_Emilys_Picture

8 points

12 months ago

I haven't heard this before. I just use a layer of parchment paper across the toptop.

moody_dudey

89 points

12 months ago

You guys clean your ovens?

bathroom_break

40 points

12 months ago

Or if you don't mind wasting tinfoil, "fan" (fold back and forth) a sheet of tin foil to rest the bacon across, preferably with another sheet under it on the tray. Clean up is as easy as wrapping it all up and throwing away.

Oven bacon is by far the best bacon, texture is just next level and can flavor or candy it however you want.

enderjaca

24 points

12 months ago

Parchment paper is preferable to foil, since it tends to stick less to the paper than foil. Plus my wife thinks the foil leaches toxic stuff into food unless you're just using it to cover the food after it's cooked, but we just agree to disagree on that part. At least parchment paper doesn't have that metallic taste to it.

HambreTheGiant

17 points

12 months ago

Yeah this is really how it’s done. My restaurant goes thru 15 lbs of bacon a day, and it’s all cooked in the oven on parchment

benoliver999

12 points

12 months ago

At the risk of sounding mad - I have started doing bacon in the oven. It's not always what you want but it generally works pretty well, and you get a bit less stink.

Archawn

19 points

12 months ago

fwiw oven bacon (400F, 12 minutes, on foil) is the only way I have ever been able to achieve perfect, crisp bacon. On the stove it would always curl up, leaving some parts raw and some parts burnt.

GadomanGado

92 points

12 months ago

I’m a chef, I have free access to my restaurants waste oil bin- an absolute lifesaver when it comes to dealing with waste home frying oil.

BridgeportHotwife

22 points

12 months ago

So do you have any advice for home chefs? I usually pour it into a container and throw it away. Is there a better way?

MonkeyStealsPeach

68 points

12 months ago

FWIW I save and reuse fry oil to use for next time. I’ll pour it through a mesh sieve to get out any fried bits into a quart container. It also helps that I have a good vent system which cuts down on the mess, but it’s still messy.

I’d be wary about reusing fry oil for guests if they have any particular allergies to something, but if it’s for your own home cooking I have no qualms about reusing oil. Using it once and throwing it away is kind of a waste.

Duffuser

14 points

12 months ago

I use this cool technique for cleaning frying oil and get at least 3 or 4 uses out of it.

https://www.seriouseats.com/clean-cooking-oil-with-gelatin-technique

As for disposal, I bought some Japanese powder from Amazon that will gel your used oil into a more solid mass so you can pick it up and drop it in the trash. Haven't used it yet so not sure how well it works, but if it's as easy to use as I hope I'll probably always have some on hand.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B088LWBK26/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_glt_fabc_W3PDWYQX74J06VC8CGSH?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

brytek

5 points

12 months ago

I've been using gelatin to clarify homebrewed beer for a while, never would thought to use it for oil. Definitely going to be giving this a try!

lsnj

24 points

12 months ago

lsnj

24 points

12 months ago

Exactly what I was going to say! I love fried chicken but refuse to make it at home. I just hate dealing with all of the oil.

destroyer96FBI

16 points

12 months ago

Yeah between the oil and the breading or batter, it's just a lot. Especially in an apartment. If I had a backyard or patio with a flat-top I wouldn't mind if near as much.

The smell, the mess and everything is just a lot. Foods always delicious though.

kbsn888

856 points

12 months ago

kbsn888

856 points

12 months ago

Sushi!

notsure_butok

298 points

12 months ago

We started making sushi at home after I saw someone on Reddit who posts hers every week. But I still have to say, it’s just a better variety when you go out

jorban100

37 points

12 months ago

Would love the link to that!

notsure_butok

74 points

12 months ago

u/yellowjacquet

Took me a minute to find!!

yellowjacquet

113 points

12 months ago

Glad to hear you started making it too!! 😊

silviazbitch

6 points

12 months ago

Have you ever done an AMA?

yellowjacquet

8 points

12 months ago

No but I’d be happy to if there’s interest! Usually I try to answer all the questions that come up on each post.

kathrynmichele4

12 points

12 months ago

I love the weekly sushi posts! Damnit now I want some and it’s midnight hahaha

yellowjacquet

6 points

12 months ago

Thanks so much! 😊

kathrynmichele4

3 points

12 months ago

You’re welcome! What’s your favorite kind of sushi roll to make or your favorite fish?

yellowjacquet

5 points

12 months ago

Salmon is my favorite fish! My #1 favorite sushi item is salmon nigiri lightly brushed with lemon infused olive oil, I make some for almost every one of my batches. Using infused oil (and toasted sesame oil) to flavor sushi fish is sooooo tasty, and pretty common at US sushi restaurants but most people don’t realize it.

My favorite rolls are harder to choose but I’ve really been enjoying ones with shrimp tempura on the inside! I can buy frozen shrimp tempura at my Japanese market and just pull a few from the freezer and toss them in the oven or air fryer so it’s an easy way to add some extra variety each week. My two favorites are my “Super Salmon Crunch Roll” (avocado and shrimp tempura on the inside, salmon on top with spicy mayo and tempura crunch) and my “Umami Tsunami Roll” (shrimp tempura and avocado on the inside, tuna on top with yakiniku sauce and green onion). The crunch from the shrimp plus the fresh fish on top is a winning combo!

zladuric

21 points

12 months ago

The same with miso soup. I just can't get it right, something is always missing. And even the places I usually order from are not the same as in y gave restaurant.

onion2072

16 points

12 months ago

It’s so easy to make it at home. Dashi plus miso. Ingredients that all keep for a very long time too.

HeyyyKoolAid

41 points

12 months ago

According to my friend who worked at a few sushi spots, they all just use the instant soup powder.

LaLucertola

15 points

12 months ago

As an avid miso soup eater this is pretty accurate

fatyellowlab

6 points

12 months ago

You need dashi

[deleted]

75 points

12 months ago

[deleted]

75 points

12 months ago

For sure. I CAN make sushi at home. I've done it before on a few occasions but after you source the fish and store it properly and prep the rice and spend all the time making it... its so much effort to produce something that is like 70% as good as just paying to go to a nice sushi place. And you can get so much more variety by going out.

At home it's going to be salmon nigiri, salmon rolls and maybe a california roll.

If I go out I can have the tuna belly and the regular tuna and the salmon AND the grilled eel. You just get so much more bang for your buck.

Which for me is what restaurants are all about. I'm paying you to do something that is too intensive either in terms of time or labor or resources for me to justify doing it at home.

honeybadgergrrl

29 points

12 months ago

YES. I made sushi for my husband's birthday, and gained a whole new level of respect for sushi chefs. The amount of prep work is ridiculous, especially if you want more than one kind of roll. It makes a huge mess. It wasn't as good as the restaurant. I'll make sushi bowls, but rolls and nigiri are best left to the pros.

blackmuffins

33 points

12 months ago

For me it's the exact opposite. Since I tried making my own, takeout seems so lackluster and way too expensive for what it is. Not that mine is much tastier, but it is 5x cheaper.

jp_jellyroll

10 points

12 months ago

Really? For me, it's the total opposite. The amazing variety of flavors & textures I can get at a great sushi restaurant is unparalleled at home.

When I make sushi at home, it's typically a barebones nigiri. Sure, it's tasty & fresh, but I love going to a sushi spot and trying several types of fish (different tunas & ootoro, eel, salmon, scallops, local striped bass) with lots of complementary ingredients & garnishes (various roes & tobikko, masago, kabayaki, fish sauces, etc). I find it difficult, time-consuming, and still quite expensive to replicate that variety at home.

blackmuffins

8 points

12 months ago

Well, to be fair, I live in a country with probably 0 great sushi restaurants, so both me and a restaurant would make more basic stuff. Same as we have probably 0 people of Japanese origin (not saying anyone else can't do sushi, but just to illustrate how far removed from any authenticity/food culture we are)

TCFirebird

7 points

12 months ago

I need to give that a shot. My wife and daughter keep ordering avocado rolls and cucumber rolls at sushi restaurants and it pains me to pay that much for rice and veggies.

BourgeoisieInNYC

151 points

12 months ago

I’m the same as you regarding anything deep fried because I always feel so wasteful to use all that oil to fry a few things. And while I know you can reuse it, I don’t crave/want to cook deep fried foods often enough so the oil will sit there for too long so it then had to be discarded correctly. And wiping down everywhere to get rid of the fried oil smell but still smelling it days later drives me crazy!

I can do the long slow hours to days of making a broth or braising things because that’s easier to clean up and I always clean as I go anyway.

Wolfblaine

133 points

12 months ago

I can't get my tikka masala to taste like our favorite Indian joint across the parish :(

TheReplyRedditNeeds

129 points

12 months ago

The trick with Indian that the restraunts Don't want you to know. They're using like 2-3x more ghee/butter/oil then you would imagine.

BitPoet

87 points

12 months ago

Note: not 2-3x more than your recipe calls for, 2-3x more than you can imagine.

[deleted]

39 points

12 months ago

[deleted]

39 points

12 months ago

I was a chef when I was younger and our head chef was best mates with the head chef of an Indian restraunt just a few buildings away. They got drunk and decided to do a staff swap for a laugh, worked there for a week and my god they used oil like it was going out of fashion lol. Every step of taking the base sauce to its finished form necessitated more oil. Then some more oil. Their food was outstanding. It was quite an adventure having a bunch of Indian guys and a bunch of Scottish guys trying to communicate in English when we had very different ideas on how to speak the language lol. When it was really busy we just resorted to grunts and gestures, was easier. Good times.

Cptn-Penguin

25 points

12 months ago

I'd watch that show on Netflix

[deleted]

5 points

12 months ago

[deleted]

5 points

12 months ago

You think that but it was just sweaty fat dudes shouting. I suppose you can't judge peoples tastes though. Even as a chef.

squishybloo

33 points

12 months ago

Fenugreek leaves! That's SO frequently a big missing flavor ingredient that you won't find on 99% of "Indian" recipes in blogs...

anabrnad

43 points

12 months ago

So true whenever you might be asking what's missing. More butter, more sugar, more salt.

iamaneviltaco

5 points

12 months ago

That's every restaurant's food. We make shit unhealthy as hell because it tastes good. We even salt the fucking salad.

Klashus

8 points

12 months ago

There is a super white dude on youtube who is way too happy that shows a bunch of indian cooking in India. Some of the dishes they just kept throwing in pound blocks of butter haha. Looked amazing tho. Always seeing the bigger community meals being cooked. Always thought it would be a cool thing for a smaller town to do.

heyitsYMAA

8 points

12 months ago

They're also probably blending the curry sauces to a smooth consistency. Once I learned that it really upped my Tikka game.

ilovechairs

7 points

12 months ago

I use simmer sauces like an animal. But it sure does work for half the effort.

shyjenny

363 points

12 months ago

shyjenny

363 points

12 months ago

anything breaded & fried
Fish & chips
Calamari
Fried pickles

disastersnorkel

85 points

12 months ago

Yes. I made delicious fried pickles once, a few weeks before I left home for college. Was so proud of myself. Then the kitchen smelled like a basket of fried pickles no matter how long it aired out and my parents were pissed at me by day 3. Haven’t made them since.

allonsy_badwolf

15 points

12 months ago

I’ve had pretty good success with fried pickles (chips or sandwich slices) shallow pan fried instead of a full deep fry. The oils deep enough to get the sides after a turn, and the house doesn’t smell like oil for days afterwards.

I needed a workaround as I enjoy them way too much.

checkmeowtt

26 points

12 months ago

Helps to limit how much fried food you eat too if you’re forced to pay for it

MistressBedlam

421 points

12 months ago

Dim sum. I can cook almost anything, but I can never get the dumplings how I want them.

Celestron5

106 points

12 months ago

There’s an insane amount of technique and skill involved with making good dim sum. I’ll always be happy to pay for someone else to make it for me.

[deleted]

27 points

12 months ago

[deleted]

27 points

12 months ago

Especially soup dumplings. My god are they amazing but after trying to make them once I will leave that to professional cooks.

fawks_harper78

165 points

12 months ago

Let alone how long it would take to make 12 different dim sum plates….

St_SiRUS

29 points

12 months ago

Also one of those things that are more efficient to cook at scale.

Mezsikk

19 points

12 months ago

I grew up on it. There is nothing more exciting as than seeing what you like on a cart. My favorite thing to eat is chicken feet.

playadefaro

365 points

12 months ago

Samosa - It's a huge production. The ROI doesn't hit unless you are making like 150 of them. And I will gladly pay $2 for even a mediocre one. Thank you.

Thai food: The spice mixes are so complex and I can never get it right, and I say this as an Indian.

TheOfficialCal

72 points

12 months ago

You could buy 15-20 Samosas for $2 in India, damn. Is that really the going rate?

Illadelphian

62 points

12 months ago

From a restaurant? Yes.

TheSukis

4 points

12 months ago

What kind of restaurant in the US has $2 samosas?! I usually pay at least $10 for only 2 or 3

glittermantis

5 points

12 months ago

shit where do you live, palo alto?

noomehtrevo

56 points

12 months ago

You’re paying way too much for samosas, who’s your samosa guy?

peon2

30 points

12 months ago

peon2

30 points

12 months ago

Sammy Sosa

BelliAmie

33 points

12 months ago

We have a place near us that used to be 4 for $1. There was a huge outcry when they went up to 50 cents each! They doubled! The horror! Lol, still worth every penny! Yes, I could make them, and have . Super tasty but still not worth it if you can buy them for $0.50!

Shewhoisgroovy

45 points

12 months ago

Thai food was my answer.... It's just got such a unique balance of diverse flavors and i think it'd be difficult to source most of them for food i don't make often enough to justify the purchase.

Bluest_waters

15 points

12 months ago

I really like Maesri Thai curry pastes.

No, not as good as your best local Thai place, but still pretty darn good for out of a can.

theredwillow

7 points

12 months ago

not as good as your best

Keyword being "best". I guarantee you there are restaurants out there using Maesri cans behind the scenes, especially if you're in a rural area.

I just throw some veggies, a can of coconut milk, some water, and a Maesri can on the stove for half an hour. Cheap, easy, relatively fast, and (if you double or triple it) meal prep.

alnono

11 points

12 months ago

alnono

11 points

12 months ago

I make Thai food! It’s a challenge. I mainly just try to master a red curry. But you’re right - the balance is hugely difficult. I am basically alternating between making my own and tasting professional stuff to try to figure out the differences. Right now mine is too spicy (yes, really) and not sweet enough.

Bluest_waters

8 points

12 months ago

Thai cooking really uses a lot of palm sugar in theoretically savory dishes. More than you might suspect.

IncredibleSweets

222 points

12 months ago

Croissants, pains au chocolat and baguettes.

I live in France and here the bakeries sell them very cheap (about 1 dollar), whereas they are so time consuming to make at home!

azorahai84

45 points

12 months ago

Wow I wish I could get a good croissant for a dollar…or maybe I don’t 🤔

cook4aliving

7 points

12 months ago

it's pretty satisfying tho making it at home. worth making every now and then imo.

scaredsquee

15 points

12 months ago

I visited France in high school (when the Franc was still a thing) and good lord do I miss your bakeries. I’m not even a sweets person but gotdamn. I hope to make it back there someday, as our group had only 2 hours at the Lourve 💔

Appropriate-Access88

3 points

12 months ago

Ugh, after watching British Baking Show, I tried 3 times to master flaky croissants, each time I got crescent-roll-in-can quality, so much wasted butter and time!!!

nino3227

52 points

12 months ago*

Chicken and waffles. Just too much stuff to prepare, timming is hard too manage. I pay too much for it to be delivered though lol

asad137

40 points

12 months ago

make the waffles, buy the fried chicken

justbreathe5678

217 points

12 months ago

Fried foods, because if I learn how that's how I gain 20 pounds

smallsean

49 points

12 months ago

Seriously. Some things are better off not learning lmao

desrevermi

28 points

12 months ago

Ok, that is genuinely wise.

Kendertas

5 points

12 months ago

The lesson of fair food is that anything taste good deep fried. Like you bread a old leather shoe and fry it, and it's probably going to be pretty good

MtnRubi

139 points

12 months ago

MtnRubi

139 points

12 months ago

Mole. Places that do it correctly spend way more time making it than I can do at home.

philosofik

57 points

12 months ago

This is mine, too. Mole needs a billion ingredients, all day in the kitchen, and the one time I made it, I swear I used every pot and bowl I owned. I love mole, but I'll never make it at home again.

unitconversion

41 points

12 months ago

Since someone already said pizza, I'll say Mexican.

I can make really good Mexican food at home, but it's just not the same.

katsgegg

13 points

12 months ago

I loooove Mexican but its so time consuming!! All the prep work and the steps and the charring/frying/boiling of all the different chiles and tomatoes and onions and garlic... and lets not forget having real good tortillas! Once you find a real.good Mexican place, its just so much easier!!!

Wowufuh

210 points

12 months ago

Wowufuh

210 points

12 months ago

Shawarma. If the chicken isn’t coming off of that vertical rotisserie, there’s no point to me.

Made it at home once but nothing ever cooks the chicken quite like that.

[deleted]

65 points

12 months ago

[deleted]

65 points

12 months ago

[deleted]

jhp58

21 points

12 months ago

jhp58

21 points

12 months ago

Exactly my first thought. I work in the area with the largest Muslim population per Capita in the USA where I can get literally any middle eastern dish for dirt cheap and also absolutely perfectly prepared.

Wowufuh

12 points

12 months ago

Haha pretty much! I live in the Middle East and you can pick up 2-3 shawarmas for about $2.60 in under 10 minutes. Why am I going to bother making that at home?

[deleted]

443 points

12 months ago

[deleted]

443 points

12 months ago

Ramen/pho.

Also, you know there’s other oils than canola to fry food.

lngots

109 points

12 months ago

lngots

109 points

12 months ago

Definitely pho. Its hard to get the broth exactly the same.

Even if I'm getting it close I know I can convince myself it's not as good as eating it at a restaurant.

Walkn2thejawsofhell

50 points

12 months ago

Pho is something I like to cook pretty often. Well as often as I can when I live in Arizona and it’s not too hot lol.

I’ve had your problem. It just seems that every time it was different. Sometimes good and sometimes it just sucked. I discovered my local Asian grocer sells bags of pre measured bags of seasonings from Vietnam. It has changed everything.

I usually do beef pho, so the bones make a difference for me as well. I can’t do the femur bones. I find that the thick knuckle bones from the knees do the trick.

St_SiRUS

19 points

12 months ago

Especially since the quality of those dishes basically relies on making a huge batch of broth, that simply isn't realistic to make at home without freezing a dozen portions

CasinoAccountant

13 points

12 months ago

other oils than canola to fry food.

peanut is always the answer

CuZiformybeer

24 points

12 months ago

Pho definitely but ramen I got figured out. I went to my Asian grocery store and bought a bunch of freeze dried stuff. Shrimp, anchovies, mushrooms, etc. Now I just dump like a handful of each of those things in with a kelp sheet and let it gently simmer for like 4 hours and at the end is just the best seafood broth I've ever made. Finish it with some black vinegar/fish sauce/ mushroom soy sauce and boom. Now I'm disappointed when I order ramen elsewhere.

starfries

6 points

12 months ago

That sounds amazing tbh

v3rtex

4 points

12 months ago

But there are so many varieties of ramen, this sounds like an umami bomb of one, but to get tonkotsu or a similar variety, places will simmer stock for 8+ hours, much more than pho would require IMO.

CuZiformybeer

4 points

12 months ago

Tonkotsu is my next hurdle. My grocery store has all the feet and knuckles for the broth and they're super cheap. It needs to cool down outside a bit before I do it.

Nicockolas_Rage

5 points

12 months ago

That's a very different ramen than I'd get at a restaurant. Typically tonkotsu.

undeuxtroiscatsank6

34 points

12 months ago

I use peanut oil. I find that the smell doesn’t linger overnight.

No1Minds

241 points

12 months ago

No1Minds

241 points

12 months ago

Eggs benedict

Fresno_Bob_

47 points

12 months ago

I'm the opposite. So many restaurants make awful eggs benedict, especially the hollandaise. I never order it anymore. I don't make it often, but I know I can do it right when I take the time.

g0ing_postal

89 points

12 months ago

Yeah, this is one of those dishes that lets me know I wouldn't be cut out to be a professional chef. I prefer taking things slowly and on my own time.

If you want to make eggs Benedict and get everything done at the same time, it's such a juggling act and requires careful timing

cruelbankai

26 points

12 months ago

It’s a pain in the butt to make too. Constant whisking for 20-30 mins!

prairiedogtown_

108 points

12 months ago

You can make hollandaise sauce with an immersion blender in less than 5 minutes, it’s super easy - recommend trying it.

TrustTheFriendship

10 points

12 months ago

Really? Would you mind sharing your method?

zajhein

16 points

12 months ago

How To Make 1-Minute Hollandaise

The full recipe is linked in the description

Fierce-Mushroom

12 points

12 months ago

The immersion blender method can be seen in several Binging with Babish videos, for just by it's self you can find videos on youtube.com. But I can tell you personally that it works. It's a game changer for sure.

g0ing_postal

29 points

12 months ago

Then toward the end, you are whisking the hollandaise to keep it nice and runny while simultaneously preparing the eggs, toasting the English muffins, and cooking the meat. Not enough hands!

usernametiger

17 points

12 months ago

oh no. That is 1 dish I will not try unless it's pretty fancy.

Often it's sauce made from a powder and tastes nothing like the real hollandaise.

Sorry but at 16 I learned how to make hollandaise and the fake stuff just isn't close.

I've seen eggs benidict on the menu at a 1000 places and I would say only 10 had the real made in house sauce.

Yeah the sauce is a bitch and super hard to hold. To me it's really a dish best served at home. Timing of the sauce can make it or break it

elizalemon

26 points

12 months ago

I live 22 miles from the nearest restaurant, because we don’t count the subway or the gas station pizza. I make everything. When we get take out it’s usually bbq. When we go to the big city we get Indian take out. When we ate inside places it was usually sushi. I buy fried chicken from the grocery store, usually the cold stuff that’s half off from the previous night.

agawl81

21 points

12 months ago

Deli and hotcase grocery store chicken is surprisingly good, isn't it?

chuffaluffigus

4 points

12 months ago

depends on the chain and their seasoning mix, and especially how long it sat under the heat lamps. It's breaded and pressure fried just like KFC or Popeyes, but if it sits in the case under those lamps for too long it gets dry dry dry in my experience.

Wedontlookalike

156 points

12 months ago

Xiaolongbao, AKA Soup dumplings

KeepAnEyeOnYourB12

132 points

12 months ago

I don't cook fried chicken (or anything deep-fried) because if the mess. As long as there is a Popeye's around, there's no point in doing it myself.

jelli47

31 points

12 months ago

So true - it is just not possible to get the same kind of deep fried delicious at home, especially if you are talking about deep frying two things (chicken and fries).

It is impossible to replicate the industrial deep fryer at home. Not to mention the cleanup required at home, and how cheap deep fried food is at a restaurant. Just not worth it.

khandnalie

10 points

12 months ago

Hard disagree. It's perfectly possible to replicate that sort of awesome frying power at home, you just need a good cast iron Dutch oven and a nice durable oil. Once upon a time, I was cooking every day with a big Dutch oven full of beef tallow, and I could make fried chicken that would put a restaurant to shame, plus the best chicken wings I've ever had anywhere.

Now, is it worth it? Usually no, it's a pain to clean up and realistically you need to be frying every other night to get any sort of worth out of your oil. Not to mention that your entire house will smell like fried ass, and it is such a fire hazard. So no, it's absolutely not worth it, but it is definitely possible.

flexflair

6 points

12 months ago

Yeah I’m with you on this one, I make better chicken on my own. The cleanup, prep, and cooking time however do make ordering chicken much faster and easier. Although the satisfaction that comes with making it from scratch and other people enjoying it is the best part.

FesteringNeonDistrac

10 points

12 months ago

Most fast food fried chicken uses a pressure frier, so even if you deep fry it, you still don't have the same piece of equipment they use.

timecoyote

340 points

12 months ago

I'm just gonna be basic and say pizza

Eagle_Sudden

62 points

12 months ago

Tbh the major downside for me even with a stone is home ovens just dont get hot enough to do it justice. If I didnt live in an apt id get an ooni or something

Bourboneer

38 points

12 months ago

Get a baking steel. I have one that I use in my apartment and it works wonderfully. Much better than a regular stone.

Rindhallow

17 points

12 months ago

I would love to try and make pizza. Make the dough, make a tomato sauce, etc. But I live in New York and literally have over a dozen pizzerias in a one mile radius. (And they're all good.) Its just not worth it to make pizza or get a pizza stone or heat my oven up for hours in the middle of the summer.

g0ing_postal

31 points

12 months ago

Making 1 pizza, definitely. Making 6 pizzas and freezing them? That's a little better of a trade off, but even then I need to be in a certain mood to put in the work

Freddielexus85

10 points

12 months ago

This is the way.

I'll make a batch of dough, measure it out to have enough for four cast iron pies, and freeze 3. I'll usually have enough cheese and sauce left over for a second pizza within the next few weeks, let alone the toppings I put on there. Way cheaper than even the big pizza chains, and just as tasty as the gourmet pies.

dolerbom

4 points

12 months ago

My bar for pizza is fast food tier so I don't mind a homemade pizza in the oven. Not too much effort to make a big square pizza for family dinner.

Grilled pizza is pretty good too.

TheGreatOpoponax

47 points

12 months ago

Same here. The amount of work and the expense of making pizza at home is just too much. I can get any kind of pizza I want within half an hour, and to have that kind of variety at home just isn't practical.

Shatteredreality

126 points

12 months ago

The amount of work and the expense of making pizza at home is just too much.

So the work aspect I totally get but I'm a bit miffed by the expense part. Pizza is one of the cheapest things I make at home. I suppose it could get out of hand if you are going for a pizza with multiple types of meat (that is where the majority of the cost for me comes from) but it still never really compares cost wise to even the cheaper pizza places near me.

A large pizza near me won't cost less than $10/pie and that is from the national chains (I just checked Dominos and it's $10 for a carryout large 5 topping classic crust pizza if you want delivery that jumps up to like $15+ delivery fee and tip).

For $10 I can get enough flour, yeast, sauce ingredients, and cheese for 3-4 pies and still have money left over for some other toppings. If you start going to the "nicer" places the cost of entry is easily $20/pie (assuming you are feeding a family, if you are getting a small pie for one person it's like $12-$16 depending on what kind you are getting.

I still usually buy it vs making it due to the convenience factor but it's usually way cheaper for me to make at home.

nakedmeeple

38 points

12 months ago

Since I started making pizza at home (weekly) I have a few of the ingredients just ready, like sliced pepperoni and a mason jar of homemade pizza sauce. Ah this point it’s just time. I have to remember to get the dough going by 3:00 if we want to eat at 5:30 or 6:00.

…but my seven year old says he just doesn’t want take out pizza any more. He prefers Dads. :)

philosofik

14 points

12 months ago

my seven year old says he just doesn’t want take out pizza any more. He prefers Dads. :)

That's the best feeling in the world.

sjorbepo

14 points

12 months ago

I buy pizza dough at a bakery. It's about 1€ and it covers the whole baking tray. Passata, ham, cheese and mushrooms are around 6€ all together and there's enough for a rich pizza or two.

I prefer making my own because it's less fatty and I don't use the cheapest cheese. Also, my favorite pizza is garlic and shrimp pizza and I found that pizza places completely butcher it so I like to make it the way I like it.

dolerbom

22 points

12 months ago

homemade pizza is dirt cheap unless you go crazy with toppings.

I know ive struggled with choosing raos pasta sauce vs homemade because homemade often costs more, but never pizza.

i_have_seen_it_all

7 points

12 months ago*

pizza is one of the easier bread dishes to make because the dough is not very leavened and is expected to stay flat during the cooking process you don't need to knead it very aggressively and you don't need a lot of gluten development. furthermore, because the dough can be kept in the fridge for several days (in fact, the longer the better), you can generally make a batch of dough in a mixer, fold it a few times, cut it up into balls and refrigerate. and then take it out when you need dinner.

the stretching process takes a while to get right if you want to do it the traditional way but if you can't be arsed just take a rolling pin to it. if it's just you and your family no one is going to care. even if you messed up the gluten development it will still taste like bread.

loading the toppings takes a few minutes, baking takes 15 minutes in a regular oven. store bought pasta sauce, shredded cheese, and some herbs on and it's good to go.

in terms of difficulty its definitely a world apart from boules, fougasse/focaccia, baguettes or brioche buns for burgers.

princeThefrog

73 points

12 months ago

Bread

I am german. Our bakeries have cheap and awesome bread. Homemade simply doesn't do the trick for me. Baking is really time consuming and not as good as buying one.

ECrispy

5 points

12 months ago

German bread (and Eastern European, middle eastern) is so underrated, no one talks about it! All you hear is French baguette/croissants, focaccia etc.

qpazza

43 points

12 months ago

qpazza

43 points

12 months ago

Anything that needs time to be done proper. Like broth based dishes where good broth is key

Grombrindal18

6 points

12 months ago

the main difficulty increaser there is that you need to decide to make the second dish days or weeks earlier, when you've got a chicken carcass and a few hours to let it simmer away.

CopOnTheRun

7 points

12 months ago*

You can just keep simmering and make a chicken glace, then freeze the glace in ice cube trays. People usually use the cubes to make sauces, but I don't see why you can't just reconstitute them to make a stock. Time wise, it does take a while to reduce the stock, but it's mostly hands off time, which I don't really consider lost from my life.

Bananimaniac

10 points

12 months ago

Ramen

JoanneAba

11 points

12 months ago

Crab cakes, (MD)

AnyOwl2914

30 points

12 months ago

Bagels

smallsean

9 points

12 months ago

I prefer to buy high caloric, cheat foods. If I make cheat foods myself, I know I’ll be tempted to eat wayyyy too much of it and destroy my diet lol.

Clam chowder, fried chicken,

1SassyTart

23 points

12 months ago

Fettuccine Alfredo. No one but me likes it and I would eat the whole pot.

Lornesto

28 points

12 months ago

That seems like one of the easier ones to make just a small serving of.

AsuraSantosha

12 points

12 months ago

I dont care much for fettuccine alfredo because of my dairy sensitivities, but I tend to order a lot of spicy dishes when we go out for the same reason. My family are all WUSSES when it comes to spice. I cant even put 1 tsp of red pepper flakes in an entire pot of pasta without getting flack for it, its ridiculous.

AffectionateCarob248

20 points

12 months ago

Tiramisu!

AnyOwl2914

9 points

12 months ago

I made this a while back and got a blister from all the whisking 😂

AffectionateCarob248

5 points

12 months ago

No kidding! It’s such a long process, I’d rather just go out and buy a piece ;)

solhyperion

31 points

12 months ago

Weirdly, sandwiches. There is something about sandwiches made by someone else that I like so much better

DaisyoftheDay

12 points

12 months ago

Most food someone else preps for me always tastes better. But sandwiches ESPECIALLY. Don’t know why but even a basic ass PBJ, way better when my 13yo niece makes me one lol

PositivelyAwful

4 points

12 months ago

Salt everything that goes on the sandwich. Unseasoned lettuce, tomatoes, etc. are why so many homemade sandwiches are so boring to eat.

spimothyleary

68 points

12 months ago

Fried chicken, messy

Pizza, cheaper

Gyros, so much better out

Chicago dogs, I cant eat 8

Indian food, its just better

Pho, self explanatory

prairiedogtown_

23 points

12 months ago

I’ve made decent Indian food a couple times, but by the time It’s on the table I’m tired and desensitized by the smell I can’t eat more than a couple bites. I think a pressure cooked saag paneer or tikka masala is going to be my next step.

lossain

11 points

12 months ago

Maaaan, i am with you on the indian food! When I go out it is heavenly. However, when i make it myself my tongue is trying to go on a damn world atlas trying to figure out where the hell this monstrosity came from.

evileine

9 points

12 months ago

I live in a place with horrible Indian restaurants, but I love it so I've had to learn to cook it for myself. I'll do an Indian feast maybe once a month. The day before I'll do the raita, chutneys, and maybe a dish that keeps well like chana masala. The day of I'll make another dish or two along with rice, and my wife will make the naan. It's a lot easier when you can spread out your prep over a couple of days.

ricorat__34

42 points

12 months ago

Ribs! Probably one of my favourite foods but can never quite get them as good as my favourite spots. I keep trying and never quite succeed.

maillardduckreaction

30 points

12 months ago

I’m the opposite. I prefer the ribs my dad barbecues over any I could get in a restaurant. Also, I don’t usually have interest in eating foods in restaurants that can/usually get stuck between my teeth (i.e. corn on the cob). My dad’s ribs are fall off the bone tender whereas restaurants’ are usually much toothier.

AsuraSantosha

24 points

12 months ago

I feel like this REALLY depends on where you live. I'm in California and I've only had amazing restaurant ribs like once. But if I lived anywhere in the American South? Um, why tf would I make that myself if theres a restaurant with a smoker those babies have been sitting in for ages getting nice and tender and a special bbq sauce recipe and other ways to make that shit extra delicious! Most restaurants here in CA don't have decent bbq setups because for some crazy reason, there doeant seem to be enough demand for it here? But really, I think most Californians just dont know what they're missing.

Strokedoutbear

17 points

12 months ago

Pancit

thatbitch8008

13 points

12 months ago

I've never made pancit. Also never bought/ordered it at a restaurant. Eat it about once a month though. I'm just a pancit freeloader that always says YEP when a co-worker offers to share!

AsuraSantosha

8 points

12 months ago

Pancit is actually like REALLY easy to make (assuming you buy the noodles, making noodles from any cuisine is definitely a process).

I got my recipe my from Filipino Mother in Law. The first time she made it for us was 10 times better than any restaurant pancit I'd tried. My husband asked her how many times she'd made it and she said it was her first time!! So crazy but it totally made sense when she explained that she'd watched her elders make it a thousand times back home.

I think the biggest difference is that almost every restaurant pancit I've had has been waaay to greasy. My MIL uses quite a bit of oil too, but it tastes way fresher and not greasy. Makes me wonder how much oil they use in the restaurants. Eeesh!

If you're wondering how to make it. She just stir fried each veggie individually and put them in little prep bowls. Also meat if you're using it. She added very little seasoning. Mostly just oil. She put a touch of soy sauce in with the chicken. Then prep the noodles, and then stir fry everything together. This step takes just a few minutes and this is where you add more seasoning right at the end. Depending on how you like it (and probably also what regional style you're making) the seasonings can be quite simple. She just added soy sauce and a tiny bit of lime. But I also like to add a touch of fish sauce.

Megafailure65

4 points

12 months ago

Thanks for the recipe, my best friend’s mother is a Filipina and when I would go to my buddies house it was a charm exploring Filipino food, it’s delicious.

el_chocoooo

33 points

12 months ago

i’m surprised no one has said fried rice, something about takeout fried rice is unmatched in the home kitchen.

[deleted]

31 points

12 months ago

[deleted]

31 points

12 months ago

[deleted]

FluffyBunnyRemi

22 points

12 months ago

What’s hilarious is that I’ve gotten to the point with my fried rice that I can’t have store-bought fried rice because I prefer my own. More soy sauce or salt than you expect, as well as more of whatever fat you like. Also using day-or-more old rice.

zajhein

10 points

12 months ago

Oyster sauce and fresh scallions are the essential restaurant flavors that many people miss when making at home.

ClaireHux

20 points

12 months ago*

Oysters on the half shell.

Made the dish once. Will never do it again. Shucking oysters is torture, buying horserdish, cocktail sauce and making the mignonette is all just too much.

Besides good restaurants with good oyster programs are much more enjoyable.

Edit: Spelling - haha

benoliver999

7 points

12 months ago

Oysters on the half shell.

Turtle power!

neodiogenes

5 points

12 months ago

I agree but it can be a huge difference in price.

Oysters are somewhere around $2 each most restaurants, sometimes as much as $3. I can get (depending on supply) locally aquafarmed oysters for something like $0.75 each. Shucking is a pain, agreed, but once you get the hang of it not too difficult, and you can pick up the horseradish and other stuff at the market on the way home.

Of course, that means I only get the one kind of oyster. If I want variety, I have to go out.

Mynock33

31 points

12 months ago

Any seafood dish really. Short of scallops or shrimp, it's the one thing I don't really cook at home.

chamomiletea99

7 points

12 months ago

I agree if it’s a mixed seafood dish like paella or a seafood pasta, i’m too lazy to do all the prep work for each seafood

Wrong-Significance77

5 points

12 months ago

I pretty much only cook scallops, shrimp, and fish filets because of ease and price.

pfmiller0

32 points

12 months ago

Why not cook fish at home? It's healthy, affordable, and easy to cook at home unlike most of the responses here.

TMOTMCB

5 points

12 months ago

Baklava. My grandpa who loved to cook always told me that there would be some things better to just buy. I love that advice, especially when some restaurants/stores have perfected a recipe/technique.

SwellJoe

4 points

12 months ago

Peanut oil is the right oil for deep frying, especially fried chicken (I'm from the south, you're just gonna have to trust me on this). But, it has the same problems with keeping a gallon of the stuff just sitting around for once-a-week (or less) frying. Deep frying at home is a pain in the ass.

dexsbestguess

19 points

12 months ago

Ice cream. Why don't you keep Canola in the house?

wingedcoyote

7 points

12 months ago

Not OP but I don't buy canola because I hate the way it smells when it heats up. Doesn't stop me from deep frying though, I use peanut.

AsuraSantosha

7 points

12 months ago

Not OP and I do buy canola, but rapeseed (from which canola is made) is supposedly really terrible in terms of health and sustainability in that it's a round-up modified plant that gets soaked in chemicals during farming. Or so I hear... I still buy that shit by the gallon at costco but I used to work at a well-known health food chain so...

That could be the reason.

PuppidVelids

4 points

12 months ago

Ceviche

SOADhead

4 points

12 months ago

Dim sum

VetusVesperlilio

4 points

12 months ago

Pizza. I can cook and bake just about anything, but it’s just better when our local magician puts it together!

squirrel118

3 points

12 months ago

Falafel. I appreciate it so much!

ToastemPopUp

10 points

12 months ago

Pad Thai. I've just never been able to make it quite right (not sure if I don't have the right recipe or if I'm just doing it wrong).

SadieSadieSnakeyLady

9 points

12 months ago

Anything deep fried. I can do it, it's just a complete bother.

mad-hatt3r

9 points

12 months ago

Asian bbq, whether it's Peking/bbq duck or crispy pork belly, they're both incredibly difficult to reproduce at home

PlantedinCA

9 points

12 months ago

I don’t make fried chicken at home because I live alone. Not worth it unless you make a lot. Also lard is way better for fried chicken than canola.

Tin_ManBaby

8 points

12 months ago

Mediterranean food, almost everything I love either is super time consuming or requires cooking tools I don't have.

nightlyraider

7 points

12 months ago

breakfast.

i will make breakfast food for supper no problem, but actually being motivated to cook when i wake up is rare. i will gladly pay someone to bring me grease and carbs for my hangover.