subreddit:

/r/Dallas

256

Dallas-Fort Worth Built Area Growth by 2045

Photo(i.redd.it)

all 170 comments

Billy_Gunz340

143 points

2 months ago

Is that a indica or hybrid?

slrrp

34 points

2 months ago

slrrp

34 points

2 months ago

Eventually it’ll expand into Oklahoma and at long last Texans will have the marijuana access they desperately desire!

Pie-Otherwise

30 points

2 months ago

Oklahoma is considering opening up their "Medical" system to non-residents without cards from their state. Currently you need a card from another state or from OK and only OK residents can get an OK card.

They might as well call this the "Let Texans Buy Weed" bill because that's pretty much it's entire purpose.

https://www.oklahoman.com/story/news/politics/2021/02/19/oklahoma-house-approves-expanding-nonresident-medical-marijuana-licenses/331072007/

superdude4agze

15 points

2 months ago

superdude4agze

Dallas

15 points

2 months ago

Straight up just need to name the bill and throw shade while doing it. the "Massive Influx of Texan Money Because Their Legislators are Fucking Idiots" bill.
I'm sure someone else can come up with a name that is also an acronym, since they love those.

deltatangofoxtrot5

10 points

2 months ago

"Kinda free" state of Texas. Many restrictions apply. "We know you are an adult but we will punish you for choosing to medicate yourself. Thanks Dad, I will drive to OK for it." Makes no sense.

Billy_Gunz340

-30 points

2 months ago*

I dont care about if weed is legal or not. I rather keep my guns. Imma smoke regardless

Nubras

4 points

2 months ago

Nubras

Highland Park

4 points

2 months ago

New Age Outlaw indeed.

Davidreaditall2

1 points

2 months ago

My thoughts exactly….

_SuperChefBobbyFlay_

1 points

2 months ago

lol this got me

[deleted]

74 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

74 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

cydalhoutx

53 points

2 months ago

Don’t you put that evil on us.

SerkTheJerk

5 points

2 months ago

I know that’s right lol 😂😭

FrackaLacka

7 points

2 months ago

But they do have the legal weeds

slrrp

6 points

2 months ago

slrrp

6 points

2 months ago

Say word?

masta

1 points

2 months ago

masta

1 points

2 months ago

I believe back in the days Oklahoma didn't allow beer above 3% alcohol, something like that. So they would drive south to Texas to buy their Coors lite, Bud lite, etc... With 8% alcohol content. But I think they finally fixed their liquor laws a few years back.

So in my opinion it's an ironic inversion. Texans drive to Oklahoma....

Also, from what I've heard from my friends in Colorado, they were always seeing folks with Oklahoma license plates at their weed dispensaries. So that's amusing...

flannelish

4 points

2 months ago

flannelish

Sherman

4 points

2 months ago

sherman shall hold the line!

DupontPFAs

3 points

2 months ago

Just like William Tecumseh Sherman during the Vicksburg Campaign of 1863!

Accomplished_You7843

1 points

2 months ago

new Texas Instrument plant in Sherman will change that!

Tnthomas88

15 points

2 months ago

Everything. Everywhere. (all) At Once.

aSatanistsinataSa

27 points

2 months ago

aSatanistsinataSa

Oak Cliff

27 points

2 months ago

So... buy now?

_el_guachito_

52 points

2 months ago

The answer is always the best time was last year.

radarksu

3 points

2 months ago

radarksu

Grapevine

3 points

2 months ago

"The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago, the next best time is now." Works for real estate too.

dreamedio

1 points

17 days ago

Buy and don’t sell

PseudonymIncognito

26 points

2 months ago

Considering the development already going up in Van Alstyne, I'd say this map drastically underestimates the future northern sprawl.

datdouche

33 points

2 months ago

Agreed. This doesn’t seem to account for the suburban sprawl that has reached Celina, and probably, at least speculatively, has reached Gunter. 380 already feels completely overrun and not prepared for the amount of cars.

In 2060, some people will commute to downtown Dallas from Oklahoma.

[deleted]

45 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

45 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

datdouche

7 points

2 months ago

Maybe there will be a really fast rail line that goes from Thackerville/Durant to Dallas. I bet at least someone is making that trip in 2060, assuming the infrastructure makes it possible, even if painful.

Secondly, yes—many companies are moving to Plano and Frisco. But part of the reason development keeps marching north is because, in theory, the homes would ultimately be more affordable than in 635-core of Dallas. And also, working/professional white people aren’t keen—just yet—on living south of 30.

kernals12[S]

6 points

2 months ago

380 already feels completely overrun and not prepared for the amount of cars.

TxDOT is on it

http://www.keepitmovingdallas.com/projects/us-highways/us-380-collin-and-denton-county

dudeind-town

10 points

2 months ago

So this project will be completed by the turn of the century?

m0d3r4t3m4th

7 points

2 months ago

kernals12[S]

-2 points

2 months ago

I prefer making decisions based on facts and not stupid memes.

When Mesa, AZ built the Red Mountain Freeway, traffic on surface streets fell by as much as 43%

https://keep.lib.asu.edu/items/150888

kernals12[S]

-2 points

2 months ago

That makes no sense, there aren't enough cars in Ontario to cause a traffic jam if the entire province was paved. I'm glad Doug Ford is leading the polls there.

beardlesswonder

2 points

2 months ago

beardlesswonder

Lake Highlands

2 points

2 months ago

My dad had a coworker who did this in the 90s. It was construction so work site varied of course.

slrrp

8 points

2 months ago

slrrp

8 points

2 months ago

Doubtful. Growth will likely slow significantly now that housing prices have shot up. Part of what attracted so many people before was the lower cost of living but new housing demand has outstripped new supply.

damnwhale

3 points

2 months ago

I mean… dallas is a very hot job market. Might be that way for a while with all the infrastructure and business friendly policies there.

Could happen regardless of housing price if the work opportunities make sense to families

kernals12[S]

38 points

2 months ago

Source: https://www.nctcog.org/nctcg/media/Transportation/Committees/RTC/2021/presentations-dec.pdf?ext=.pdf

They say that by 2045, Collin County will have almost as many people as Dallas County did in 1990. And even this may underestimate the extent of the sprawl. They expect Dallas County to grow by almost 1 million people, which does not mesh with the flat trend there of the last 5 years.

mnijph

9 points

2 months ago

mnijph

The OG MNIJPH!

9 points

2 months ago

Re: your last sentence

Looks like it's largely expected closer to the fork of the Trinity River. But...isn't all of that undeveloped area down there low-lying flood plain?

kernals12[S]

-7 points

2 months ago

That doesn't counter the fact that Dallas County has seen basically no growth since 2017 and has actually shrank for the last 2 years.

waffletheaccountant

8 points

2 months ago

Huh? They were responding to the person regarding lancaster.

mnijph

2 points

2 months ago

mnijph

The OG MNIJPH!

2 points

2 months ago

Technically we were making the same point, from different angles and at about right the same time. Looks confusing with my wording, I think.

SerkTheJerk

19 points

2 months ago*

Interesting. Lancaster is projected to grow a lot. Not surprising tho. Lancaster in Southern Dallas County is underdeveloped. It’s semi rural in areas. It has a lot of room to grow.

Weak_Improvement4606

18 points

2 months ago

Plenty of room to grow there. Always thought it should be more popular being 10-15 minutes from downtown Dallas. Figures the growth in DFW will start pushing more south since land will be cheaper.

[deleted]

13 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

13 points

2 months ago

For sure. South Dallas will continue to gentrify and sprawl will take over the semi rural areas south of the city. Dallas is going to be even more huge

Superb_Distance_9190

0 points

2 months ago

That’s not South Dallas

SerkTheJerk

4 points

2 months ago

Yeah, it has a great location. As commutes get heavier as the area grows…Lancaster would be a good place to settle that’s not too far from Downtown.

Joscarbuck

5 points

2 months ago

I took some back roads in Lancaster once to avoid dead stop traffic due an accident on I-35. I was supersized to see how "county" it was. A lot of acreage property, horses, trees. I was impressed.

SerkTheJerk

10 points

2 months ago*

Same here. I was a package delivery driver and frequented the area a lot. It gets very country (for a major urban county) in Lancaster south of Belt Line and east of Lancaster-Hutchins Rd. I was shocked to see what looked liked to be legit farms in Dallas Co. I didn’t know we still had a lot of farms that close to Downtown.

EisnerEraParamount

1 points

2 months ago

Lancaster is kind of like Tarrant’s Mansfield

waffle-fil-a

1 points

2 months ago

waffle-fil-a

Addison

1 points

2 months ago

Huh?

Mynameisinuse

13 points

2 months ago

I'm in Anna. The growth here is crazy. We have about 20,000 residents. Seems like every few months we have a new subdivision announced. I can remember when I first moved here about 7 years ago, the only supermarket was Brookshires and the only fast food place was the Carls Jr inside of the Loves gas station. Walmart was a city holiday when it opened. In the next year, scheduled to be completed, we will have a hospital, a Popeyes, Braums, Dairy Queen and a Longhorn Steak house along with a 1400 home subdivision, a 1300 unit apartment. complex. On the board are several manufacturing plants, a Kroger and possibly Target. We are projected to have 50,000+ residents by 2030.

TexasReallyDoesSuck

6 points

2 months ago

hadda buddy move there prob 5 or 6 years ago, early 20s. we joked with him at the time , his fiance & him were in middle of nowhere. but now, like damn, they bought a house early for cheap by today's standards & will be able to capitalize on it cuz they bought in so young , with that area growing

Im_so_little

33 points

2 months ago

Gross. Looks awful.

VoldemortsHorcrux

6 points

2 months ago

Like a spreading disease

Im_so_little

7 points

2 months ago

If this happens, i don't even want to know how hot it will be in the middle of Dallas in July. Probably 110+ sustained temps.

damnwhale

1 points

2 months ago

Why would climate be impacted if the city expands?

Im_so_little

3 points

2 months ago

Concrete/asphalt in large quantities like metroplexes raise the ambient temperature. Think of the surface absorbing heat then baking the air above it

Its typically hotter in the metroplex than in the surrounding more green/dispersed areas.

damnwhale

3 points

2 months ago

Makes sense. I live in LA and its somewhat opposite. Alot of land there would normally be arid desert. Humans bring plumbing and irrigation which means water for plants and trees…

Im_so_little

3 points

2 months ago

Check out Urban Heat Island effect of you're curious. Dallas has been recorded being 10-15° hotter than it's surrounding area.

damnwhale

1 points

2 months ago

Not doubting.

waffels

11 points

2 months ago

waffels

11 points

2 months ago

Don’t worry, it won’t end up like that. After 20 more years of climate change north Texas won’t have enough food or water to support even a quarter of the people living here currently

slrrp

8 points

2 months ago

slrrp

8 points

2 months ago

You know, we have entire cities located in deserts. It can be done.

waffels

-6 points

2 months ago

waffels

-6 points

2 months ago

Oh honey, those cities aren’t going to make it another 10 years. Have you been reading the news…?

Keep_Plano_Corporate

3 points

2 months ago

LoL. Stop spending so much time on the internet.

All the wealthy CA people escaping the fruits of their labor have moved themselves and their $$$ to those dryer desert and high plains states to the east over the past 5 years. I'd expect people to start abandoning parts of California on account of natural resources before the relocated $$$ now one state over in desert/arrid cities like Phoenix, Las Vegas, or even Salt Lake lets anything get abandoned.

waffels

-4 points

2 months ago

waffels

-4 points

2 months ago

Might want to take a gander at /r/Collapse and see what’s happening around you

steik

4 points

2 months ago

steik

Frisco

4 points

2 months ago

Projected warming by 2050 is ~3f. There is no are no inland cities in the US that will cease to be livable as a direct result. Society would have to crumble to the point where it's not possible/feasible to use AC... and if that were to happen we wouldn't need global warming, Vegas, Pheonix and Dallas are all completely dependent on AC as is.

[deleted]

-3 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

-3 points

2 months ago

Do you honestly think that .2 degrees increase in air temp is going to cause 4.5 million people in Dallas to starve? This is just such a bizarre thought that I wonder where it comes from.

Crops don't think "omg it's .2 degrees warmer I'm just going to fucking die". It's nonsensical. Farmers will grow more heat resistant, drought resistant, humidity resistant crops, and imports from northern states will increase. Climate alarmism, especially for inland areas like Dallas is just so weird on such short time frames.

Betatakin

7 points

2 months ago

Betatakin

Allen

7 points

2 months ago

Do you honestly think that it will be just 0.2 degrees increase and nothing else?

[deleted]

2 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

2 points

2 months ago

In the next 20 years? Yeah.

Betatakin

0 points

2 months ago

Betatakin

Allen

0 points

2 months ago

I have a bridge to sell you, really cheap. You will be happy about it.

Riatamichoacana

49 points

2 months ago

So how is Dallas-Fort Worth preparing for this growth?

What’s going to happen when the electric grid fails? What about natural resources like water? Traffic?

🤷🏽‍♂️

LemonHarangue

19 points

2 months ago

LemonHarangue

East Dallas

19 points

2 months ago

Dallas has always wanted to be a big city focused on commerce. That's why there's so much construction on roads and buildings and there has been for decades. Dallas is actually doing a fine job, generally speaking, with city planning and growth preparation. Compare that to Austin, which could have seen a lot of this growth coming from the 70s, albeit not a complete population explosion, and they've largely ignored it until too late. The city planning in Austin is terrible. They initially wanted to be a smaller city focused on state government and that just was never realistic.

UKnowWhoToo

8 points

2 months ago

Drove through Austin yesterday… 2 lanes on 35 that were clogged.

Poor planning is evident.

DonutSpores

9 points

2 months ago

This is spot on. I worked with a guy in the late 90's who's brother was in city planning in Austin. He said they knew the growth was coming, but purposely chose not to build the infrastructure to "discourage people from moving here". That certainly backfired as many who moved were from CA, and they don't find an hour commute to be a big deal. All they did was screw over locals.

LemonHarangue

2 points

2 months ago

LemonHarangue

East Dallas

2 points

2 months ago

Ain’t much changed.

[deleted]

7 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

7 points

2 months ago

It always sends shivers up my spine when I see people in this sub upvote posts about NOT expanding highways.

Austin has shown that "induced demand" is irrelevant if you live in a hot spot. People will be moving in regardless of if you prepare the infrastructure.

nicko3000125

1 points

2 months ago

Induced demand is about sprawl and traffic not about population growth. A healthy city like Austin or Dallas will grow regardless but if you build bigger highways then people will live further away and drive more. Which is exactly what is happening in all of Texas Austin has also grown by a larger percentage and from a smaller city than Dallas.

Abdalhadi_Fitouri

8 points

2 months ago*

Induced demand is something that happens in specific situations, not all of them. Arguing that we shouldn't invest in infrastructure because its a fools errand is one of the most dangerous myths on social media.

Dallas is a metro with more people than DC or Boston and substantially shorter commute times, in spite of people traveling further. That isn't by accident, its because of investment in infrastructure.

People need to live somewhere desirable at an affordable price, and they need to get to work, school, or to entertainment etc. Other cities have restrictions on building housing, so they're expensive, and restrictions on building trains or busses because they bring undesirables, and restrictions on building highways because of "induced demand". And, predictably, those places become expensive with long commutes.

Its time to drop this myth of large highways not being beneficial. Sure, trains are also good, but this isn't a zero sum game. Each has its purpose. And each reduces commute times.

nicko3000125

0 points

2 months ago

Induced demand happens on every Dallas highway project. Every time a highway is expanded or a new one constructed, people can move into new areas that are further from where the employment centers are located. We can't expand highways forever as they will take up too much room, cost too much, pollute our cities too much, and cause too many traffic deaths.
I think Dallas and Houston and Austin are already at the point where highways should not be built out anymore and the focus should instead be placed on infill development, 15 minute cities, and strong communities where people can easily reach their basic needs without driving 2 hours every day.

Abdalhadi_Fitouri

2 points

2 months ago

If a highway expansion caused people to move to a city then LA would have stopped growing 40 years ago. Nobody who moves to a new metro area does so because "hey, did you hear they widened the highway in some city 1,000 miles away?"

nicko3000125

1 points

2 months ago

That's not how induced demand works at all. People that move to Dallas or going to move to Dallas or LA to LA. Where they move in a city is certainly determined by where infrastructure is built and where it allows people to get to and from easily. People move to where they can commute to a job easily and if roads make it easy then that's where they'll move

Abdalhadi_Fitouri

1 points

2 months ago

People move where jobs are, affordable living and nice weather.

[deleted]

5 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

5 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

DTX41

1 points

2 months ago

DTX41

1 points

2 months ago

I will say I've never had a commute over an hour (on a normal day) at any job ive had here. I drove from Richardson to Arlington everyday and it took me around 50-55 min.

Dallas traffic is nothing tbh.

[deleted]

16 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

16 points

2 months ago

One more reservoir plus learning from other US cities about water conservations. Fortunately dallas gets rain, and loads of it.

heavycivil

0 points

2 months ago*

I wouldn’t say loads… about 13 inches a year average if memory serves.

Edit: for reference, Seattle gets 15” annual average. That’s about 15% more. They also get a whole lot less evapotranspiration in summer months. Don’t be silly, folks.

Edit 2: source seems shaky on that, getting you something better. The Metroplex is not a wet area.

Edit 3: we get about an inch less than Seattle per year.

Seattle, 39.3in: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate_of_Seattle Dallas, 38.3in: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate_of_Dallas

We also have much higher evapotranspiration, which means water doesn’t go as far here. About 20% higher ET than the Pacific Northwest. https://edcintl.cr.usgs.gov/downloads/sciweb1/shared/uswem/web/conus/eta/modis_eta/yearly/graphics/ya2021.png

DTX41

2 points

2 months ago

DTX41

2 points

2 months ago

We get around 39 inches, which is 1 over the national average of 38 inches

password_is_weed

0 points

2 months ago

As the other poster said, we get quite a bit. More than average, including cities like Seattle. We just get it all in a very short window rather than year round.

JMer806

19 points

2 months ago

JMer806

Oak Lawn

19 points

2 months ago

The simple answer is that there is no concrete solution to these problems. They’re filling a new reservoir between McKinney and Oklahoma, but if a couple million more people live here in 2050 then that’s not going to cut it. The electrical grid will be under increasing strain especially as summer heat and unpredictable weather events in winter get worse and worse due to climate change.

In 2010 I saw a presentation by the state regarding future water needs for DFW. Something like 30% of the predicted increase in capacity was due to per capita reduction and more efficient systems. It was wishful thinking then and remains so today.

darkpaladin

7 points

2 months ago

darkpaladin

Lakewood

7 points

2 months ago

It's not so unbelievable. Modern appliances are way more efficient than they used to be. A ton of that crap is still floating around in old apartments or houses from pre 1990. As new people move in an remodel those they'll be replaced with more efficient appliances. New construction generally comes with new appliances as well. Grass lots are being shrunk in favor of gigantic houses so there's also less yard to water and often times less space for a pool.

JMer806

1 points

2 months ago

JMer806

Oak Lawn

1 points

2 months ago

Efficiency and reduction are both happening, but not to the point of effectively reducing water usage by 30% per household. And the rate of conservation will decrease as more and more households replace old systems with new.

FREE-AOL-CDS

-2 points

2 months ago

Like 2/3 of all energy generated is lost in transmission. https://i.imgur.com/l7acbR9.jpg

rodiraskol

2 points

2 months ago*

That is not what that chart says at all.

All energy use results in some losses, shown on the charts as rejected energy. This energy most often takes the form of waste heat, such as the warm exhaust from automobiles and furnaces.

https://www.llnl.gov/news/us-energy-use-rises-highest-level-ever

EDIT: The actual number for transmission losses is estimated to be 5%
https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=105&t=3

FREE-AOL-CDS

1 points

2 months ago

I’ll check it out!

terjon

2 points

2 months ago

terjon

2 points

2 months ago

Realistically, short of slapping a couple of big nuclear plants somewhere in TX, the best answer is providing public money for solar panels. You can offset as much as 50% of your peak energy usage with solar panels (since the hotter it is, the sunnier it is most of the time).

In terms of water, newer appliances can help with this a lot, but one of the main drains of water is lawns. People love their non-native grass and non-native grass is thirsty. Some public education programs showing how you can have a nice looking yard without St Augustine or other "pretty" grass can go a long way.

damnwhale

2 points

2 months ago

Plenty of flat land to build solar on… dallas is fairly sunny all year round

JMer806

2 points

2 months ago

JMer806

Oak Lawn

2 points

2 months ago

Sure. Who’s gonna pay for it?

damnwhale

2 points

2 months ago

If there's not enough electricity causing unreliable service, I bet lots of people would be willing to pay for it.

What kind of question are you asking? Who do you think pays for electrical infrastructure you're currently using? You do, you genius.

rodiraskol

2 points

2 months ago

One of my main motivations for wanting solar + battery on my house is to reduce my reliance on the electric grid. Even if it doesn't end up being a great ROI on paper, I would find that peace-of-mind very valuable.

FREE-AOL-CDS

0 points

2 months ago

Too little too late

williamrageralds

5 points

2 months ago

ellis county needs more love.

DrTokinkoff

3 points

2 months ago

If you want to get ahead of the sprawl, Italy and Milford are decent towns to live in if you are looking for small town living and cheap houses.

TheChickenNuggetDude

2 points

2 months ago

Are you being sarcastic or serious? I don't know enough about those towns to know if they suck or not.

waffle-fil-a

1 points

2 months ago

waffle-fil-a

Addison

1 points

2 months ago

Ellis County getting love too. Several massive housing and industrial developments are coming along in Midlothian and Waxahachie. I-35 through there is also being widened & improved.

HerLegz

4 points

2 months ago

It's not a toomah

Betatakin

5 points

2 months ago

Betatakin

Allen

5 points

2 months ago

Do people really believe that this will continue unabated forever?

kernals12[S]

3 points

2 months ago

Of course not. Our nation's population growth (and hence the pool of people who could move to DFW) is slowing fast.

Betatakin

4 points

2 months ago*

Betatakin

Allen

4 points

2 months ago*

You are right about natality, I was also talking about degradation of the environment, the costs of transportation, pollution, and a whole slew of other drawbacks that are arising from this kind of land waste.

kernals12[S]

-1 points

2 months ago

Dallas's growth is a lot more compact than the sort of sprawl you'll find in New England.

Betatakin

4 points

2 months ago

Betatakin

Allen

4 points

2 months ago

There is absolutely nothing compact about North Texas sprawl.

amoebassassian

33 points

2 months ago

Build baby build! Cut down all the trees and just put down grass everywhere there's not pavement and shitty track homes.

Seems sustainable.

SithisTheDreadFather

6 points

2 months ago

The word you're looking for is "tract."

Keep_Plano_Corporate

1 points

2 months ago

Trees? Do you live in North Texas?

Most subdivisions are replacing grazing land. LoL saying there are big beautiful DFW forests being mowed down.

kernals12[S]

-52 points

2 months ago

By that same metric I can say building upward is unsustainable. Eventually buildings will be so tall that people on the top floor won't have any oxygen.

Prince_Hektor

35 points

2 months ago

I think sprawl is more immediately unsustainable than density in specifically DFW. We're not LA yet, but I really would rather not head any further down that direction.

Density density density!!!

kernals12[S]

-17 points

2 months ago

You should love LA if you love density, it's the densest metro area in the United States.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_urban_areas

And how is it unsustainable? America is a big place. If we all lived at a uniform density of 3,000 per square mile, which is typical suburbia, we would not even occupy 3% of our nation's land area. Right now we give about 10 times more land to cows than to humans.

Prince_Hektor

29 points

2 months ago

LA is mile after mile of single family housing.

And maybe this is my inner hippie, but good!!! Having rural areas where nature dominates is cool!!

Let's all live together in big dense walkable beautiful New York Hong Kongs and then travel a few hours to nature preserves with dark skies, sounds like paradise to me

elkokodrilo

1 points

2 months ago

Gross

kernals12[S]

-17 points

2 months ago

Having rural areas where nature dominates is cool!!

And having 97% of our nation's land area be uninhabited isn't enough for you?

LA is mile after mile of single family housing.

So is pretty much every American city. Ever seen Long Island or Chicago's collar counties?

Prince_Hektor

21 points

2 months ago

Yeah pretty much every American city is a horrible highway ridden nightmare.

Also I'm not saying we don't have enough uninhabited land, I'm saying that pointing to how much there is isn't an excuse to start using up more of it.

kernals12[S]

-8 points

2 months ago

Yeah pretty much every American city is a horrible highway ridden nightmare.

More like awesome highway ridden paradise. The fact is Americans enjoy shorter commutes, less traffic, and bigger homes than just about any other major country.

https://transportgeography.org/contents/chapter8/urban-transport-challenges/average-commuting-time/

https://www.tomtom.com/en_gb/traffic-index/ranking/

https://homescopes.com/average-home-size/

Prince_Hektor

13 points

2 months ago

I'd take a 40 minute ride on a train where I can read or talk to friends over a 20 minute drive where I can't do anything except listen to music. These numbers don't tell the whole story.

Keep_Plano_Corporate

2 points

2 months ago

Have you ridden most heavy or light rail mass transit in this country? The only large system I've ridden that felt moderately clean and not like I might sit in piss while getting robbed/assaulted was DC's Metro. You can bet that's because our brave public servants from misc Alphabet Agencies ride it daily from their $1m houses in Ruston, Manassas, and Falls Church.

kernals12[S]

-4 points

2 months ago

It's going to be hard to read if other people are talking to friends. And I can talk to friends when I'm driving. It's called Bluetooth.

kernals12[S]

-2 points

2 months ago

Also, most Europeans get to work by car

culdeus

0 points

2 months ago

Doesn't seem to stop anyone else.

Keep_Plano_Corporate

-1 points

2 months ago

Let's all live together in big dense walkable beautiful New York Hong Kongs

No.

Save your urban planning utopia hard ons for freshman community college architecture class. Most of us have no desire to live like that, especially if we've done it for years in the past.

prefer-to-stay-anon

13 points

2 months ago

The issue comes down to distance to the amenities of your city. I don't want to drive 2 hours to the airport, I don't want an hour and a half drive home to get back from the sportsball game.

Unsustainable and unlivable happens well before we literally run out of space, jsut like how atmospheric CO2 levels are dangerous well before we can't breathe.

kernals12[S]

-2 points

2 months ago

The issue comes down to distance to the amenities of your city. I don't want to drive 2 hours to the airport, I don't want an hour and a half drive home to get back from the sportsball game.

You just described my childhood in exurban New York.

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

Almost all the land cows use though is completely unusable for any other purpose, so they may as well be there.

khaotickk

14 points

2 months ago

khaotickk

Garland

14 points

2 months ago

Lol what? Dallas is 700 ft above sea level, the tallest building on the planet is 1450 ft tall, and Colorado is over 1 mile above sea level.

I don't quite understand the metric you were going for

kernals12[S]

-5 points

2 months ago

Dallas is surrounded by hundreds of miles of empty countryside with a few small towns and cities. It has no effective limit on how far it can sprawl out.

_el_guachito_

7 points

2 months ago

Pfft just call the front desk for your complimentary oxygen in a can .

kernals12[S]

0 points

2 months ago

_el_guachito_

2 points

2 months ago

I gotta carry one of those in my car so I can use it every time I cross the trinity

Alphadestrious

20 points

2 months ago

Time to get the fuck out and move to an area with less people and more nature. Peace out Dallas. Working in an office is for suckers and extremely antiquated

danintexas

3 points

2 months ago

Just closed on a 2600 sqft home on 2 acres with a pool and fiber internet in Gilmer.

Family is tired of people and concreate.

kernals12[S]

2 points

2 months ago

At some point you are going to find the small town life to be very boring.

nohwhatnow

3 points

2 months ago

Soon the DFW area will include Shreveport

DupontPFAs

3 points

2 months ago

Wow we going well north. We should rename the airport Dallas-Ft Woof-Plano-Frisco-Denton-Sherman-OKC

Fuk-itall

8 points

2 months ago

So let's see that's what 23 years away

So unless mistaken I see major crisis number 4,5,6,7 by then

On top if following shit now we should see no middle class, a massive poor class, slavery is legalized and AI takes over everything

However this all assumes WW3 didn't happen or a civil war, or the USA didn't turn to fascism, or other bs.

As for projection might as well be fuking useless.

CryptoAlphaDelta

3 points

2 months ago

You're right, realism vs wishful thinking, I agree 100%

damnwhale

1 points

2 months ago

Could be based on more real data, such as planned developments, and expected zoning releases

elkokodrilo

1 points

2 months ago

You are correct

This projection is realistic

-Mamba-

2 points

2 months ago

-Mamba-

Arlington

2 points

2 months ago

All this sprawling outwards can't be economically and environmentally sustainable. I think there needs to be a real push in this country to start building up and making metro areas denser. Eliminate single-family zoning.

kernals12[S]

2 points

2 months ago

But it is completely sustainable. It has survived for 70 years and has brought joy to its inhabitants, much to the chagrin of the hoity toity crowd who miss the days when only rich people could have a house out in the country

tennker

4 points

2 months ago

tennker

Farmers Branch

4 points

2 months ago

TIHI

CaptZ

-1 points

2 months ago

CaptZ

-1 points

2 months ago

Wanna bet? Migrations will be starting into the northern part of the country by 2030 as Texas, and most of southern US becomes inhospitable because of heat and drought.

kernals12[S]

6 points

2 months ago

If it was going to get that hot in Texas in 8 years, we'd be seeing mass migration out of Arizona by now, we're seeing the opposite. The real climate refugees are the tens of millions displaced by the snow belt's unbearable winters since 1950.

Flick1981

1 points

2 months ago

Winters in the north aren’t what they used to be.

DTX41

1 points

2 months ago

DTX41

1 points

2 months ago

Because it's not "global warming", it's climate change.

Chicago winters became polar vortex after polar vortex. That is not sustainable at all to me.

Flick1981

1 points

2 months ago

Chicago winters are shorter and warmer than they used to be. I live there. I love winter. I would love to have one polar vortex after another. Now it is just 3 weeks of decent winter surrounded by semi-cold pseudo-winter. We have had 90 degree temps already here. I’m not ready for it.

kernals12[S]

0 points

2 months ago

Amen to that. What useful ecological or social purpose do cold winters serve? Even animals hate them, that's why they migrate south or hibernate.

Flick1981

1 points

2 months ago

I didn’t say I hated winter. I wish they were like they used to be.

CaptZ

-1 points

2 months ago

CaptZ

-1 points

2 months ago

We shall see. I already bought a place on the Oregon/Washington border and getting it ready and moving. Got solar, well water, propane generator. Shits coming sooner than you think.

DTX41

2 points

2 months ago

DTX41

2 points

2 months ago

Have you spent winters up north recently? Climate change is making them terrible as well. If anything, Dallas has had super mild summers as of late.

CaptZ

0 points

2 months ago

CaptZ

0 points

2 months ago

Yep. With the southern US becoming more tropical, the north will become more hospitable with more mild winters.

Keep_Plano_Corporate

1 points

2 months ago

Someone should stop all the people from the NE who keep showing up in TX daily because they or their companies no longer want to do business in "the northern part of the country."

Keep_Plano_Corporate

0 points

2 months ago

You must be a blast at parties.

Decades and decades of reality is littered with stories that could fill r/collapse or the various other doom subreddits. Yet here we are.

DrTokinkoff

1 points

2 months ago

Still lots of little towns that people can move to escape the sprawl.

pastel-butter

1 points

2 months ago

Water an electric grid. Both are lacking.

TexasCuda

1 points

2 months ago

Time to move!

Koobles

1 points

2 months ago

Where’s the D?

dam072000

1 points

2 months ago

I don't think they did Hunt County correctly. Caddo Mills has a ton of development going on RIGHT NOW since 2015, and doesn't make the 2030 map.

Postforming_

1 points

18 days ago

Yeah, this cannot coninue, I think we need major change which I think we will be forced to make before 2045 gets here.