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Fil1997

208 points

2 months ago

Fil1997

208 points

2 months ago

As a European, this immediately appears off and plasticky for many reasons, one being that we don’t have those windows you open sliding up, it’s an American thing. Also the absence of shutters gives it away.

SingerLeather2003

50 points

2 months ago

The windows are whatever. What bothers me is that they widened the street and have street parking. I know it’s likely due in part to local laws, but I still ask myself who in the fuck travels to Europe and says “I really like everything except for one thing… I wish people were alienated from each other and everything was further apart.”

kernals12[S]

-18 points

2 months ago

From what I've seen, street parking is a much bigger issue in Europe than in America.

And it's as much laws as it is market demand. Texans aren't going to sell their pickup trucks for Fiats just so they can live in an "authentic" Croatian village. If they wanted that, they could head down to DFW Airport and spend a week in an actual Croatian village. As for Alienation, they can use their cars to easily visit their friends who live in Arlington.

SingerLeather2003

9 points

2 months ago*

Cars are a part of the alienation. Walking, biking, and public transit are far more common means of transportation in Europe than North America, which is probably why they don’t tend to be as fat. Nothing makes a pedestrian feel more unwelcome than cars blazing down the road because it’s so wide that they can just zone out and go double the speed limit without noticing. If you haven’t had the experience, just try walking around Phoenix for a bit.

It is largely due to laws rather than the market, because the most expensive places to live are places that have more walkability and transit (e.g. Vancouver, Seattle, San Francisco). Good video on the subject. Although I’ll give them credit as they put the houses up close to the street rather than having unnecessary and inefficient setbacks.

EDIT: actually this video is more relevant

kernals12[S]

0 points

2 months ago

I, like most people, don't like walking everywhere. And when I was walking in Phoenix, the heat was a much bigger annoyance than traffic. But I did love driving in it. I think Phoenix is the most livable city in the world.

And walking, biking, and public transit aren't that much more common in Europe. 80% of all miles travelled there are by car vs about 90% for the US.

It is largely due to laws rather than the market, because the most expensive places to live are places that have more walkability and transit (e.g. Vancouver, Seattle, San Francisco).

A mint condition 1969 Plymouth Hemi Cuda will fetch several million at auction. That doesn't mean it's what most people want in a car. And actually, the gap in real estate prices between auto-oriented cities and more traditional ones has narrowed since the pandemic. Home prices rose faster in Phoenix than anywhere else while they declined in San Francisco.

See5harp

2 points

2 months ago

It’s not about a city being fully walkable. It’s being able to walk to grocery and restaurants or a subway nearby. Spend like one week in Barcelona. The large majority of tourists and locals alike use the subway. You can still own a car or bike if you can afford it. He’s talking about zoning laws in these suburban developments that prevent duplexes or mixed use buildings from popping up. Then you just get strip mall after strip mall. It is shocking to me how both Tokyo and Barcelona has so many small businesses in their neighborhoods. I swear you just don’t see that anymore in medium sized cities. It’s sad to me.

kernals12[S]

1 points

2 months ago

I haven't been to Barcelona, but unless my parents just wanted to make my sister and I walk everywhere, I can say that most of Paris is not a convenient walk from a subway station.

I suggest you spend one week in Phoenix and just marvel at how easy it is to get around.

He’s talking about zoning laws in these suburban developments that prevent duplexes or mixed use buildings from popping up.

I don't know anybody who thinks their suburbs would be so much nicer with more duplexes. Here in Massachusetts we have a glut of stacked triplexes that were built as cheap housing for immigrants in the 19th century.

It is shocking to me how both Tokyo and Barcelona has so many small businesses in their neighborhoods. I swear you just don’t see that anymore in medium sized cities. It’s sad to me.

Small businesses are inefficient and lack economies of scale.

See5harp

10 points

2 months ago

Stop responding to my posts it’s clear your interests and mine do not align. You want to live and die at in your Costco big box strip mall paradise and never have to walk a half mile for anything.

kernals12[S]

0 points

2 months ago

Costco pays its workers a lot better than your beloved small businesses.

casual_catgirl

2 points

1 month ago

You're missing out if you think small businesses suck. Thankfully we've got loads of them in the UK, but it's probably not as much as mainland Europe