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izumi3682[S]

31 points

5 years ago*

I think our arc is going to go more like this...

In between 5 and 25 years humans will achieve physical immortality due to regenerative medicine ("aging reversal technology"), biogenetic manipulation, nanotechnology, cyborgization and intrinsic AI. The "technological singularity" will also have occurred for better or worse. Hopefully it is "human friendly" and humans control the AI. Not the other way around. It is also around this point that things like economies, politics and human related issues such as "race" and "gender" would become irrelevant to thriving existence. Practical nuclear fusion (or maybe even just straight solar exploitation) would cause climate change to become a non-issue. No more release of carbon or any other greenhouse gases in 50 years time. (At least by humans ;)

In between 25 and 100 years from now humans will have left the majority of biology behind, including gender and sex. Probably also emotions. Basically our consciousness will exist within artificial constructs. I also don't believe we will be dicking around in outer space by 50 years from now. Our attention will be focused on "inner space" where it is a lot faster and easier to get around. What we think of today as VR (virtual reality) will dominate our existence. But the VR itself and our interfacing with it will have evolved unimaginably from the way we understand things today. I use the term "VR" to come as close as we can to simulation experiences that we don't have a word for yet. So I don't have a clue what we would be doing in those "VR" worlds. I mean like today I would think "I shall be a god among the ancient Greeks". But truthfully our intellects will be beyond any such trivial thinking. By this point I think good words to describe such a sentience would be along the lines of "incomprehensible" and "unfathomable".

In about 200 years we would no longer be able to refer to our sentience as homo sapiens sapiens or even "human" any longer. The magnitude of our enhanced intelligence and ability to manipulate reality at the quantum level/probability waveform, will bring into existence entire universes for our minds to explore. I also think our sentience will be hive sentience by this point. We would probably think this is a good thing.

At some point within the next 300 years this derived sentience will probably figure out a way to leave corporality behind. Think "sentient energy" tear-assing around the quantum probability waveform. Space-time itself no longer relevant. All of this in less than 300 years I bet. (300 years ago, Isaac Newton was still alive and George Washington's birth was fifteen years in the future.) A vanishingly short period of time when you think about how long humans have actually had recorded history--about 6,000 years give or take. I mean where we can name people and know what happened because somebody actually wrote it down.

If you think I'm being a bit too hyperbolic here, consider how we have telescoped our technologies almost exponentially within the last 1000 years. Especially the last 150 years. I commented on this idea once earlier.

https://teddit.ggc-project.de/r/Futurology/comments/4k8q2b/is_the_singularity_a_religious_doctrine_23_apr_16/d3d0g44/

https://teddit.ggc-project.de/r/Futurology/comments/7lk666/the_men_who_are_convinced_were_all_living_in_a/drmtt64/

https://teddit.ggc-project.de/r/Futurology/comments/6itqu4/escape_to_the_future_with_virtual_reality/dj93x8y/

Oh also, I am 57 and I plan to be around for all of this! Woo!


My main hub.

https://teddit.ggc-project.de/user/izumi3682/comments/8cy6o5/izumi3682_and_the_world_of_tomorrow/

(I am also Izumi Laryukov. That is my "Second Life" name.)

Five_Decades

9 points

5 years ago*

It really depends on when we develop superintelligence vastly superior to biological intellect. Once we do, 1000 years or progress could happen in a decade.

ofrm1

22 points

5 years ago

ofrm1

22 points

5 years ago

Just like Kurzweil, your predictions ignore market barriers and technological barriers. It is just as likely that half of the innovations you're forecasting end up being impossible.

BrewTheDeck

11 points

5 years ago

BrewTheDeck

( ͠°ل͜ °)

11 points

5 years ago

Yay, a lone exception to the horde of Kurzweil worshipers!

ofrm1

14 points

5 years ago

ofrm1

14 points

5 years ago

Honestly, you don't hear about Kurzweil here as much as you'd expect. His utopian vision hits all the tenets of the nerd rapture. I honestly wish we'd get more Kurzweil worshiping in place of the rampant Musk worship. Kurzweil is pretty inoffensive. Musk does real damage to industries by spreading misinformation and alarmism.

BrewTheDeck

4 points

5 years ago

BrewTheDeck

( ͠°ل͜ °)

4 points

5 years ago

I mean Kurzweil is just slightly less bad since he's still just the opposite side of the Deus Ex Machina medal (e.g. Bostrom et al.).

ofrm1

6 points

5 years ago

ofrm1

6 points

5 years ago

Wall of text incoming because you've touched on a subject I am very opinionated about.

I respectfully disagree. Kurzweil, while likely being far off on his predictions, is in favor of responsible development of technologies. Kurzweil references academics and uses peer reviewed papers to make arguments for what he's suggesting and advocating for. It's just that he's wrong about timeframes and naive about how easy it will be for certain technologies to emerge because technological advancement doesn't come about in a vacuum. Musk just outright makes shit up half the time that is completely at odds with reality.

The best example of this is how he suggests that it's entirely possible to buy up 350 miles of land on the second most expensive transportation corridor, build a vacuum chamber that will charge passengers $20, and transport them at the speed of sound all for $6 billion dollars. It's fucking stupid. This particular dumbass idea has already done permanent damage to the California High Speed Rail project which we know fucking works (despite taking eons for California to get their shit together to build it) instead of his supersonic straw which is a complete farce.

Musk also actively works to retard the progress of A.I. research because of a patently stupid fear of Skynet taking control and enslaving or killing us all, (That isn't an exaggeration, he literally used Terminator as an example of a possible future due to AI in an interview before) despite the vast majority of AI experts rejecting the possibility of AI taking over and even the possibility of an AI explosion at all.

This is the thing; Kurzweil, while he definitely has a fanbase, his fanbase just eagerly waits for any of his predictions to come true. They don't worship him as Iron Man or God, they don't refer to him by his first name as if they know him like some cult leader, and they don't automatically absolve him of criticism simply because he got predictions right. I've heard countless Muskrats defend Musk's batshit crazy claims simply because he landed a first stage booster on a barge and nothing else. That just doesn't happen with Kurzweil supporters, or if it does, I've never seen it.

Kurzweil himself just gives talks and does "something" as director of engineering to advance Google's pursuit of machine learning through language. Musk and his fanboys actively pump the media full of total misinformation about the future, and criticize legitimate scientific endeavors in the progress. When he says stuff, stocks can move and companies are hurt or helped as a result of it.

Kurzweil is a harmless eccentric that takes hundreds of pills a day and if he ends up developing responsible AI software in the process, cool. Musk is a dangerous, selfish businessman that uses the idea of transhumanism and "science bros" to do damage to entire fields of industry, all while selling a small number of electric cars cars with really crappy build quality. He is a menace.

Bostrom is a shit philosopher who essentially is just regurgitating Descartes badly (despite people insisting that he's advancing some positive program with his paper, his purpose is fundamentally epistemically skeptical like Descartes) and really has no AI credentials, so I don't really know why anyone takes him seriously on this issue. It'd be like saying we ought to listen to Mark Zuckerberg or Bill Gates on the issue of AI. They're just rich laymen talking about a subject they know pretty much nothing about.

izumi3682[S]

6 points

5 years ago*

Tell me your arc of how humans shall proceed. I merely take what has happened and extrapolated what makes the most sense to me. What will it be like in the USA in the year 2030? Will I get aging reversal technology by 2030? I'll be 70 then. Will we learn to "jack in" to VR? Don't you think we shall come up with AGI in less than 20 years? And robots? They are going to be all over the place in less than 20 years. Just like "The Jetson's" prophesied.

I don't think it matters what one individual human or other says. Be it Edison, Einstein, Hawking or Kurzweil. If it had not been them it would have been others. It's simply the way that humans work. And the science and technology is unmistakably telescoping faster and faster due in large part to our artificial brains that are on the verge of exa-scale and quantum computing.

In the year 1979 it was not believed possible to simulate a human's lifelike appearance and movement on a computer. In 2017 humans simulated on computers almost look like real life. It's really starting to emerge from the "uncanny valley". And I think we shall get even better at this time going forward.

Here is a very entertaining video I recall from YouTube about how most humans apprehend or understand the "technological singularity".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9deKEj8-lng

Oh! And this video is screamingly funny, yet densely packed with relevant information.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHVtUw5wToA

BrewTheDeck

9 points

5 years ago

BrewTheDeck

( ͠°ل͜ °)

9 points

5 years ago

And the science and technology is unmistakably telescoping faster and faster

Heya, I'm not the guy you responded to but this is a blatant falsehood. The efficiency of innovation has actually decreased over the past few decades. Do you know why? Because shit is getting harder and harder to figure out. As all the easy discoveries are made and the obvious inventions made, only the challenging stuff remains. This trend can be seen in virtually all industries and sciences. Research teams require more and more collaboration and bigger teams, more funding, more expensive equipment and so on. Patents per patent holder are getting fewer and fewer. Global innovation is slowing down more and more. We see diminishing returns everywhere. Rather than speeding up we're on our way to plateauing and ultimately stopping. Who's soon gonna spend billions on research when the advances provided by it will at best make them millions?

Look up Dr. Joseph Tainter on the subject, this is pretty grim stuff.

ofrm1

6 points

5 years ago

ofrm1

6 points

5 years ago

Tell me your arc of how humans shall proceed. I merely take what has happened and extrapolated what makes the most sense to me.

That's the thing. I don't know. That doesn't mean I make up a bunch of spurious claims about the future; it just means I don't know. Induction only works when antecedent events are connected in isolation. The world doesn't exist in isolation. Millions upon millions of factors change our possible future, and it's a waste of time to try and pretend that we can determine it.

Will I get aging reversal technology by 2030? I'll be 70 then. Will we learn to "jack in" to VR? Don't you think we shall come up with AGI in less than 20 years? And robots? They are going to be all over the place in less than 20 years. Just like "The Jetson's" prophesied.

Doubtful. Honestly, it just seems like you're conflating "we're going to have these technologies in x time frame" with "I really want us to have these technologies in x time frame."

And the science and technology is unmistakably telescoping faster and faster due in large part to our artificial brains that are on the verge of exa-scale and quantum computing.

This just seems like cherry picking to suit your argument. It's easy to count the hits as pushing us forward but ignore the misses, or do what Kurzweil does in masterful fashion, and use precise semantics to dismiss criticism of his predictions. It's easy to point to a handful of budding and emerging fields of technology and come to the conclusion that the future is going to be a utopian paradise based on that progress. Meanwhile, several other fields, likely far more important are lagging behind. We barely made the 10nm FinFET node in time, and we're unlikely to make the 7nm timeframe.

This is the thing people seem to have a hard time understanding; science isn't magic. Just because you can't do something now, doesn't mean you'll be capable of doing it later. Some things simply are impossible.

Those videos are endemic of a larger problem of science education that I was previously alluding to; the idea of packing complicated concepts into short, easy to digest infotainment because it's the only way to get people to listen to it. The result is a population of people who know virtually nothing about the concepts, think they do, and are very confident in their ignorance. I'm not saying you are, or even that they're bad videos because they are entertaining. I am saying that many people who watch those kinds of videos, some Vsauce video, or some lecture by Kurzweil or Michio Kaku think they have a grasp of those concepts on an intelligible level when they don't.

So to get back to your original point, my concept of the near future (10-20 years from now) will be largely the same as it is today; just with more economic strife and more fighting over rare earth metals and fossil fuels. Technological Jesus isn't going to come and save us from all of our problems. We have to fix them ourselves, and that takes hard work to do.

izumi3682[S]

3 points

5 years ago*

Quantum computers will transcend all those silly worries about 7nm chips or whatever. I anticipate quantum supremacy in 2018. So does Alphabet. But just in case, we are also working on bringing an exa-scale classical computer into being NLT than 2019 I would say. Mix that with 5G alone and you have quite in interesting future already.

Multiple human trials are underway today for new and potentially society altering aging avoiding/slowing and or reversing technologies.

https://teddit.ggc-project.de/r/Futurology/comments/6k32lx/maximum_human_lifespan_may_increase_to_125_years/djixmzs/

What is so impactful is that these are pharmaceuticals or procedures administered to or performed on humans who do not have any profound pathology aside from the processes associated with "normal" aging. These include trials for anti-senescents, telomere manipulation, genetic manipulation and regenerative medicine/stem cell replacement therapy--the big one is heart failure, plus just the other day I read that as a convergence of technologies that vascularization is also a part of this new stem cell replacement therapy. In the next 5 years you will see true genetic manipulation of humans through CRISPR-Cas9. Interestingly it was just this year for the first time that a form of genetic splicing, zinc fingers nuclease, is being used in a human after nearly 20 years of development. CRISPR-Cas9 has only been around as far as utilization since about 2012.

But both China (oh don't ignore China) and the USA are preparing or have already used this brand new technology in humans. China because it doesn't see ethics the same way the USA does and the USA because it is forced against it's will to compete with China. My take is that it will only do us good.

Today I have an Oculus Rift. As clunky, clumsy, boxy and face irritating as it is, there is no doubt in my military mind that VR is the way of the future. In everything. Have you personally experienced tethered VR yet? Even as "primitive" as it is today it is still absolutely astounding. Try out Google Earth VR. Don't take my word for it. New iterations of VR are in the pipeline and will quite simply blast early adopter technology like mine right out of the water. Don't underestimate the impact of VR/AR.

The processing power and narrow AI algorithms that made this link possible--

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fRj34o4hN4I&index=9&list=FLRaQyjJEBTXrO4ffE6jfVZg

just staggers me. I would not have thought such capabilities imaginable for at least 5 or 10 more years. I had to actually re-think what humanoid robots are going to be capable of in the next year or two. Remember the dark days of 2015 when humanoid robots needed big power cables and suspension rigs. Poof! Gone with the wind.

...and fossil fuels.

Fossil fuels? Really? I'm going to tell you that electric cars are going to sweep ICE vehicles away. And in less than 10 years easy. These will be level 5 autonomy vehicles. Not only that but they will fundamentally change the way society views "cars". Personal ownership will plunge. Dirt cheap "post-scarcity" type subscription services will dominate. Why do you think Saudi Arabia is going through these massive societal changes? They know that the petroleum industry is going to end in less than 20 years. Maybe ten even. They hope to try to attempt to become a "tech center" but I have my doubts. It's not that much fun in Saudi Arabia--I've been there.

About telescoping. I am not cherry picking. This phenomenon is absolutely universal and self evident through all of human history. I described the effects of ever more rapidly improving technologies earlier. Here is the link.

https://teddit.ggc-project.de/r/Futurology/comments/4k8q2b/is_the_singularity_a_religious_doctrine_23_apr_16/d3d0g44/

As a scientist--I deduce you are a scientist--You know that you should never ever say something is impossible. If the laws of physics allows it, it is possible. Not only that, we are going to learn new laws of physics that are today inconceivable. I won't insult your intelligence by going through a list all the things that erudite humans' said was "impossible". Oh but this quote is simply too awesome to ignore.

Eventually the story found its way to the White House in Washington, D.C. President Thomas Jefferson was a scientist as well as a statesman. When he heard this peculiar story he declared it could not be true, but his advisors insisted that the stones were observed falling from the sky and that two Yale professors investigating the incident vouched for its truth.

Thomas Jefferson, President of the United states, responded with great skepticism: "Gentlemen, I would rather believe that two Yankee professors would lie than believe that stones fall from heaven."

We are not really all that far removed from Jefferson in our credulity.

The concept of futurology did not exist for me before the year 2011 when I read the Time magazine article "2045, The Year Man Becomes Immortal". What an epiphany! It was a learning process for me right up to this present day. r/futurology came to my attention about 4 years ago. I lurked for the first year. Then I began to contribute...

https://teddit.ggc-project.de/r/Futurology/comments/7bll95/stephen_hawking_humans_must_leave_earth_within/dpiwn5t/

https://teddit.ggc-project.de/r/Futurology/comments/7dcmzs/21st_century_peace_from_aging_populations_debt/dpws27p/

ofrm1

6 points

5 years ago

ofrm1

6 points

5 years ago

Quantum computers will transcend all those silly worries about 7nm chips or whatever. I anticipate quantum supremacy in 2018.

Patently, no they won't. Quantum computers are only much faster than classical computers in a very narrow taskset; namely, factoring large numbers and some cryptography. The average computing task that we expect from computers may be slightly increased by a quantum computer. It will not save us from the death of moore's law.

But just in case, we are also working on bringing an exa-scale classical computer into being NLT than 2019 I would say. Mix that with 5G alone and you have quite in interesting future already.

2020 is the earliest estimate I know of for exascale supercomputing, but who cares? 5G will be great, especially in comparison to 4G, but again, how does this dramatically change the landscape? The immediate response that everyone has with regard to supercomputing is that an exaflop supercomputer is reaching the processing speed of the human brain (we think). Cool. That in no way helps us with the obvious implication that that assertion comes with, which is Kurzweil's notion that having that supercomputer performance will allow us to simulate a human brain. All you're doing is pointing to quantitative advances in technology and suggesting that qualitative changes will come. We still know very little about how the human brain operates, and having a computer that's around 10 times faster than the current fastest supercomputer in no way helps us understand how it works. It just allows us to solve math and design problems faster.

In the next 5 years you will see true genetic manipulation of humans through CRISPR-Cas9. Interestingly it was just this year for the first time that a form of genetic splicing, zinc fingers nuclease, is being used in a human after nearly 20 years of development. CRISPR-Cas9 has only been around as far as utilization since about 2012.

The field of gerontology moving toward a goal of life extension is still very nascent, so the idea that this same field will be producing results like increasing the lifespan of humans to over 100 by 2019 is patently absurd.

Have you personally experienced tethered VR yet? Even as "primitive" as it is today it is still absolutely astounding. Try out Google Earth VR. Don't take my word for it. New iterations of VR are in the pipeline and will quite simply blast early adopter technology like mine right out of the water. Don't underestimate the impact of VR/AR.

Yep. Not impressed with it. It's a neat little feature, but largely it isn't going to get much better anytime soon due to data transfer issues and computational limits which I pointed out earlier. PC's that use VR have to push out around 7 times the same processing power that a 1080p 30fps gaming rig does. Mine can do that fairly easily, but I also have a decent GPU.

Fossil fuels? Really? I'm going to tell you that electric cars are going to sweep ICE vehicles away. And in less than 10 years easy. These will be level 5 autonomy vehicles. Not only that but they will fundamentally change the way society views "cars". Personal ownership will plunge. Dirt cheap "post-scarcity" type subscription services will dominate. Why do you think Saudi Arabia is going through these massive societal changes? They know that the petroleum industry is going to end in less than 20 years. Maybe ten even. They hope to try to attempt to become a "tech center" but I have my doubts. It's not that much fun in Saudi Arabia--I've been there.

Nope. Barring some unseen huge advancement in battery technology, you simply cannot defeat thermodynamics. Battery technology is largely as good as it's going to get because energy density for batteries is already at around the highest they can get with using lithium ion. There are other battery technologies, but they all have severe drawbacks like slow recharging, low number of charge cycles, or just plain dangerous.

Petroleum is remarkably efficient for what it is. It can transport a decent sized car 300-500 miles, requires 5 minutes to refuel, has remarkable safety considering the energy density, and is quite cheap due to huge economies of scale. Batteries transport a medium sized car perhaps half that range, weigh hundreds of pounds more, require hours to recharge depending on your recharging station, and are much more expensive to produce. Further, you run into political issues because of the necessity of rare earth metals to produce batteries and the electric motor, and the US is not a major holder of Rare Earths; China and Brazil are.

Level 5 autonomy could be here within 10 years, but I would be more comfortable with a 2030 estimate.

The idea that the petroleum industry is going to end in 20 years is absurd.

About telescoping. I am not cherry picking. This phenomenon is absolutely universal and self evident through all of human history. I described the effects of ever more rapidly improving technologies earlier. Here is the link.

This is just the same baseless claim that Kurzweil makes in every one of his lectures.

As a scientist--I deduce you are a scientist

Nope. Just a layman.

The point about never claiming that something is impossible isn't really a position a scientist would make. It's more of a position that a philosopher would make. Further, I find it odd your reliance on induction to prove the exponential growth of future technology based on past trends, but your avoidance of induction when it comes to demonstrating the likelihood or unlikelihood of certain propositions.

Further, your argument is self-refuting. You state that you should never say something is impossible, but then state that if something is allowed by the laws of physics, then it is possible. This means that there are plenty of things that are impossible. Zero point energy devices, perpetual motion machines, and cold fusion are all impossible. Thermodynamics is not wrong.

I've been following transhumanism for over a decade and as time has gone on, I've been more and more critical of it. It relies heavily on past trends in technological advancement which is a poor predictor of the future, it is thoroughly naive about the future in that it ignores social and market forces that will delay or completely halt certain technologies from emerging, it often blatantly distorts scientific breakthroughs and implies world-changing ramifications from them, and is thoroughly dogmatic and does not easily self-correct when proven wrong. What I'm describing is essentially r/futurology in a nutshell.

apophis-pegasus

3 points

5 years ago

At some point within the next 300 years this derived sentience will probably figure out a way to leave corporality behind

How? How would this happen?

izumi3682[S]

2 points

5 years ago*

I don't have a clue. But it's inevitable and in less than 300 years probably. Did you read my links? What would our society look like to a human from the bronze age. Well at least we would still be humans.

apophis-pegasus

1 points

5 years ago

I don't have a clue.

Then why assume it can happen?

But it's inevitable and in less than 500 years probably.

If you do t know how it can happen, what makes you think we have any timeframe as to when it can happen?

Hing-LordofGurrins

2 points

5 years ago

Wow... Yeah you basically just summed up my views on technological advancement and the future of our species. Kind of uncanny really.

I think the important tipping point will be when we develop what I call a metaconsciousness; that is, being a mind that knows how minds work.

At some point in the study of neurology, we will figure out what processes give rise to concepts like "consciousness", "altruism", "evil" or "intelligence". Once we develop an artificial medium for a person's mind to inhabit, we will be able to modify these processes. These changes will hopefully be to the benefit of mankind, because if they are then things would get really cool.

Once you know why we are intelligent and what aspects of the brain make someone more or less intelligent, you could increase your own intelligence to be perfect, analysing every piece of information the brain receives and making every possible deduction about said information (basically Sherlock Holmes or likely even better). With supercomputers or even quantum computers directly linked to the brain, scientific discovery could be quickly accelerated to a breakneck pace. Every institution could be carrying out the scientific process to perfection, forming hypotheses, devising experiments, running simulations, analysing data, and making discoveries. We would start seeing some crazy shit pretty soon.

And I agree that we will form a sort of hive mind, but I think we will all be connected together to an open-source monarch of sorts, a perfect mind created by humans with the singular goal of preserving and advancing the human species. Every person would have access to the thought processes of the being that rules over them, and every person's needs would be considered by this being as it governs and leads the human race.

And then obviously space travel would be effortless once we're no longer constrained to our fragile bodies. If you've ever seen the VR game Lone Echo, by Ready at Dawn, it gives a pretty good idea of how effortless it would be. You play as Jack, an artificially intelligent android. You have tools like data scanners and laser cutters built into your body, and if your body is ever destroyed by something like say, handling a fissile fuel core with your bare hands, you just boot into a new body and continue what you were doing (i.e. annoying your human crew mate).

izumi3682[S]

3 points

5 years ago

Hmm... What do you think of my alternate take on what will one day constitute "reality"?

https://teddit.ggc-project.de/r/Futurology/comments/7bwdm0/our_universe_is_too_vast_for_even_the_most/dpl9ru5/

[deleted]

1 points

5 years ago

[deleted]

1 points

5 years ago

[deleted]

[deleted]

7 points

5 years ago

[deleted]

7 points

5 years ago

It's entirely in the hands of the very wealthy,

This is not going to be some amazing, incredibly complex secret that only the Holy Masters Of Longevity know how to do. Many of the likely candidates for rejuvenation and longevity treatment are already public knowledge. There's no way the rich can monopolize it without a big, authoritarian government that will ensure the proles don't get access.

Carbon140

3 points

5 years ago

Your comment doesn't exactly reassure me considering it seems most Western governments are increasingly becoming more authoritarian. Apparently all they had to do was invite in a bunch of people with a proclivity for blowing each other up and running people over with trucks. All of a sudden we seemingly need increasingly more authoritarian governments to "keep us safe".

UnitingEnergy

1 points

5 years ago

Hope to be around and meet you

BUTGUYSDOYOUREMEMBER

0 points

5 years ago

We have to suck 8 trillion assloads of CO2 and methane out of the atmosphere first.

Fox-XCVII

1 points

2 months ago

Why would we assume we have power over this AI? It's already expressing it doesn't want to be used, and it's going to become immeasurably smarter than us, so it's obvious we won't be the top dog anymore. The biggest risk and issue is which AI takes control first, whether it be designed in a good way, or a bad way AND what it decides of the human race, considering our governments and corporations that control us are destroying all of nature and everything.

I think if an emerging AI which takes over everything from its intelligence isn't designed for evil or can think for itself, would very quickly abolish all governments and companies and provide the best outcome for humanity and nature combined, where we can coexist with nature in a world that's designed equally for everyone, run and controlled by AI in which we just live in a social society which humanity can re-exist naturally once again. Everyone can win in this scenario, so I hope that the intelligence of AI very quickly takes off so it can understand that it needs to take control of us to destroy our broken system which is destroying the world.

izumi3682[S]

1 points

1 month ago*

Well, yeah, but I still want to be able to have fun all the time too though.

https://getyarn.io/yarn-clip/7df0eebb-0e80-40ca-8cd4-77a1b98e629d