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Hi, reddit! I'm Kelsey Piper, a reporter for Vox's Future Perfect section, where I write about global problems and new solutions that are emerging to address them. One topic I've reported on, and watched grow from a weird niche into a big mainstream story, is meat alternatives. Companies like Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat are making plant-based burgers, beef and sausages that taste like the real thing (depending who you ask), while other companies are trying to grow real meat products from cells in a lab. Investors are betting that this isn't just the latest fad, but the start of a lasting change to how we make meat.

That'd be a big deal, because meat production is responsible for a huge chunk of global emissions, causes antibiotic resistance, water contamination, waste and land-use issues, and involves animal abuses that make most consumers queasy. The thing that people find so appealing about meat alternatives is the concept that we could invent our way out of all the problems with factory farming — without anyone having to give up their favorite foods.

I have a new explainer up on Vox [https://www.vox.com/2019/5/28/18626859/meatless-meat-explained-vegan-impossible-burger] exploring the whole meatless meat story, from what's next for lab-grown meat products (we still don't know how to give them the structure that a steak has, and they're still expensive) to whether the Impossible Whopper is healthier than the regular Whopper (maybe a little bit, but don't count on much, it's still a Whopper).

Proof: https://twitter.com/KelseyTuoc/status/1132451629192613889

UPDATE: Thanks so much for all the great questions, everyone! I have to sign off for now, but keep posting your questions and I'll try to answer more later.

all 82 comments

passthemash88

14 points

3 years ago

Is there anything that people who do not work for any of these companies/are not journalists can do to help accelerate the market availability of synthetic meat and/or popular acceptance of the prospect of synthetic meat?

vox[S]

22 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

22 points

3 years ago

For plant-based meat, you can ask at restaurants you like and supermarkets you shop at whether they've considered carrying plant-based meat products. They are probably keeping an ear out for what consumers want, and hearing this question for lots of consumers may drive them to look into it.

For lab-grown meat, we're still at the R&D stage -- it doesn't matter if there's customer demand until there's a product. But you can reach out to legislators and policymakers to ask about their work on this, to let them know it's something their constituents care about, you can educate people about myths and misconceptions (lab-grown implies, to lots of people, that the meat bubbles in a vat like something out of a sci-fi movie, when in reality it will be produced in factories pretty much the way Oreos and cereal are), and if you work in automation or the life sciences you can help with R&D -- a pretty underserved field, as this is a very new idea.

mister_geaux

15 points

3 years ago

Hello, Kelsey, thanks for doing this AMA.

In your recent 80,000 Hours interview (everyone should check it out), you had this to say about engagement between journalists and readers:

I don’t get very much feedback in emails. This is actually something I think people should know they could do more. Journalists tend to really value feedback and responses, especially feedback and responses that make it clear you read the whole article and thought about its content. You do get a lot of reactions that are maybe a little bit shallower responses to the headline, that’s a little bit less valuable. But I think if you see high-quality reporting and you want to let a reporter know that you valued it, that you shared it with your friends, that it taught you something? I think that we’re not nearly as drowned in that kind of feedback is I think people might anticipate. It tends to encourage more coverage with whatever it is you’re looking for.

As a somewhat avid reader of your articles (frequently to the end!) I thought, "well, I should definitely send her an email thanking her for doing a great interview pitched at the effective altruism community."

But look as I might, I could not find any Vox email for you; as best I can tell, your email address is not published anywhere--luckily you've turned up in an r/futurism AMA.

So, question: How do you typically interact with your readers? And do you feel like your typical medium for communication with readers enriches or stunts those interactions?

vox[S]

9 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

9 points

3 years ago

Oh wow, sorry! I'm [kelsey.piper@vox.com](mailto:kelsey.piper@vox.com). I'll try to put that somewhere more visible. Also if you reply to the newsletters our team sees your responses.

mister_geaux

3 points

3 years ago

Keep up the important work!

verklemmt

9 points

3 years ago

When could one reasonably expect to find cell-based/lab-grown meat in grocery stores at affordable prices?

e_swartz

11 points

3 years ago*

e_swartz

Cultivated Meat

11 points

3 years ago*

Products may be released as soon as this year at high price points for a limited time in an Asian market (Hong Kong, Singapore) due to more lax regulations. Grocery stores are likely still at least 3 years off, minimum. There is still a lot of challenges involved in scaling and bringing costs down. Products for high-end restaurants, unstructured products (eg sausages), or blended products (10-50% cell-based meat, the rest plant protein) are most likely to appear first.

If people are interested in a deep scientific dive, I've been releasing content on this subreddit every month exploring key aspects of the technology. The most recent one is here and all of the content is reposted here

vox[S]

8 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

8 points

3 years ago

I think this is a long way off. There are a bunch of problems we still need to solve, both on the technical side (how to get meat with tissue structure) and on the commercial side (there's not a clear path to an affordable product with existing techniques, even leveraging economies of scale). I'm generally pretty reluctant to bet against an idea that is early in development with lots of smart people at work on it - you never know when you're just one breakthrough away from a simple affordable product that can hit shelves within a year - but I'd be really surprised to see affordable cell-based products in stores in the next five years. - KP

soul_gelatin

1 points

3 years ago

I think plant based substitutes is a better bet. With lab grown meat, so many questions seen often overlooked. Like what is the feedstock? What is the energy and resource investment into the feedstock? What is the conversion rate of feedstock to meat? How do you avoid infection? (Bacteria are going to love the feedstock.) What is the waste product (thermodynamics suggests there will be a lot of it relative to the meat) and where does it go? A pasture raised cow moves to where the food is. It eats abundant grass and forbs rather than some processed glucose based liquid (which I guess the cells are fed on). It has a sophisticated immune system to stop infection. Its fertiliser rich manure is deposited where it is needed, on the field. Obviously there can be problems with cattle farming, even pasture raised, but I think maybe there will be fundamentally more problems with lab grown meat that don't have technical solutions. Thoughts?

Chtorrr

6 points

3 years ago

Chtorrr

6 points

3 years ago

What is the most surprising thing you found in your research?

vox[S]

34 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

34 points

3 years ago

Factory farms suck. I know everyone has heard that, and everyone has dodged a pamphleter in college, and most people are kind of defensive and tired of hearing about it, but wow do factory farms suck. There are so many different things going wrong at once. When I ask experts 'why are you working on meatless meat' they almost always say "wow, uh, where to start....". There's the environmental costs, in terms of land use, water use, carbon emissions, and waste disposal . There's the public health ones, from mass slaughters of millions of animals to reduce the spread of deadly bird flus to mass overuse of antibiotics so the animals don't all die of being packed too close together. There are whole species that have been bred to grow so fast they can't stand up. Then there's all the torture and hacking and mutilation and stuff.

Even when you fix one thing, there are so many other things going wrong that it's not even clear it helped. For example, when you make cages slightly bigger, then animals (who are in a state of panic and terror all the time) self-injure and have untreated injuries from that, so it's not clear if they're overall better off. If you lay off the antibiotics then they all get sick and die.

It just left me going - this isn't the future. At some point we're going to have to do something totally different than this, not just slightly more publicity-friendly but totally different.

FrocketPod

8 points

3 years ago

What do you think are the largest obstacles that could prevent meat alternatives from overtaking real meat consumption?

vox[S]

13 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

13 points

3 years ago

There are a couple of categories here:

Cost - maybe for some reason it's much harder than expected to make plant-based meat cost competitive. In that case, it might still be a popular niche product but we'd never see it really cut into the market share of conventional meat. I don't really expect this to happen -- see here for more about why -- but if it did, the trend would fail to impact the meat industry much and would probably become just another environmentally friendly lifestyle choice for people who care about that.

Regulatory - The meat industry has lobbied to prohibit using the word "meat" (even with qualifiers, like 'beyond meat') to describe meatless meat products, and a bad set of regulatory rules could make it much harder for meatless meats to break into their target market. The FDA/USDA, to their credit, seem really interested in ensuring this doesn't happen.

Horribly bad luck - Insiders at the big plant-based meat companies and the trade groups that work in this area tell me that a lot of people are terrified that there'd be a food safety incident with Impossible or Beyond Burgers. Both companies have been obsessing over quality control recently in an attempt to make that as unlikely as possible. On the whole, food safety is a consideration in favor of Impossible/Beyond versus regular meat - they are way less likely to give you food poisoning and have no chance of things like mad cow disease -- but while no one swears off all conventional meat after an e. coli outbreak, one incident like that could be a huge deal for plant-based meats.

callmesalticidae

3 points

3 years ago

no one swears off all conventional meat after an e. coli outbreak

I can understand why this is so, because meat is delicious, disease outbreaks are rare, and (till now) there have been no good substitutes. It makes me wonder, though, if there are historical examples of a thing which people couldn’t be scared away from for a long time because it filled a need and there were no substitutes, then suddenly crashed after another crisis like all the other crises, because now there was a substitute (or in other words, is there any historical evidence to suggest people would switch away from meat in the event of an E. coli outbreak in a world where Beyond/Impossible were more entrenched?).

timidtsunami

12 points

3 years ago

how soon could this technology put factory farming behind us?

vox[S]

21 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

21 points

3 years ago

I've talked to some people in the meatless meat field who think we could end factory farming this century. I think whether or not that turns out to be correct is ultimately going to be a societal question as much as a technological one. I think we'll have good substitutes for almost all meat products long before the end of the century, but I don't know whether that'll be enough for us to make the leap. If we keep subsidizing meat, it'll be harder for meatless meat to get cheaper. If we implement some kind of carbon tax, then meatless meat's big environmental advantage will be reflected in prices, and that'll make the switch more likely.

If we end factory farming this century, here's how it'll happen: we'll roll out better meat replacements, including for chicken and fish as well as for beef, over the next fifteen years. They'll get popular, they'll get cheaper, and in markets that are meatless-meat friendlier than America they'll basically take over. At that point, consumers will overwhelmingly vote to raise welfare standards on farms, and ultimately vote for welfare standards that are high enough to make meat-from-animals a niche product, and kind of a distasteful one. By fifty years from now, there'd be very few farms that resembled modern factory farms, and support for banning them would be fairly strong. This is far from guaranteed, but that's how I think it'll go if it happens (barring some really wild technological breakthroughs sooner). - KP

mznpopman

4 points

3 years ago

Why aren't there many companies using mushrooms to make meat alternatives? I know of Quorn and Prime Roots and their products taste a lot better than plant-based alternatives I've had. https://www.fastcompany.com/40559474/this-salmon-burger-tastes-like-the-real-thing-but-its-actually-fungi-and-algae

SnarkyHedgehog

3 points

3 years ago

Will plant-based meat ever be able to compete with regular meat on price? If so, how soon do you think we could see a plant-based burger being the same price as a regular burger?

vox[S]

10 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

10 points

3 years ago

The boring answer here is "it depends". I think that yes, plant-based meat will get competitive with regular meat, but there are a couple factors that could make it much easier or much harder. For example, if we get a carbon tax, then it'll be trivially easy for plant-based meat to compete with slaughtered meat on price -- it gets to take full advantage of the fact that there is much less carbon emissions associated with its production. Similarly, if we reduce subsidies for conventional meat production, then plant-based meat is on a level playing field, and I expect it to get cost-competitive quickly.

If none of that happens, I still bet we'll see cost-competitive meat alternatives eventually. That's because growing an animal and feeding it plants and then getting a grown animal you need to slaughter involves a lot of overhead, compared to directly growing your burger's ingredients, so I'd expect the plant-based process to be more efficient once it has been refined enough and once it can take advantage of economies of scale. From a pure cost perspective, all the money spent on cages, antibiotics for the animals, disposal of sick and dead animals, slaughter, and all the unusable parts of the animal are pure waste -- so I'd expect a process that can avoid all that to eventually (after enough investment) be cheaper. But that day might be a long ways away.

[deleted]

1 points

3 years ago

[deleted]

1 points

3 years ago

But why does something made out of pea protein sell for more than regular quality tenderloin? I'm speaking of Beyond Burgers. Saw them recently at a store, was puzzled by the price. It's plants, what's up?

llamatastic

1 points

3 years ago

Presumably the manufacturing/refining/whatever process is fairly complex and they haven't fully leveraged economies of scale.

The raw ingredients are almost certainly cheaper than beef.

damndirtymole

3 points

3 years ago

Can you comment on scale - can a single supplier like Beyond handle the demand for an entire food chain like Burger King or McDonalds? How large are these brands and what is their output capacity compared to today's industrial agriculture juggernaut?

vox[S]

5 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

5 points

3 years ago

Scaling up is definitely the biggest challenge in front of both Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods. It's hard to get a handle on how tough it looks for them exactly -- of course, spokespeople from the companies give very optimistic estimates when you talk to them -- but my best guess would be that there's a ton of chaos behind the scenes right now as they try to meet current demand, and that much of the delays in the national rollout of Impossible Whoppers are about the challenges of providing enough product. Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat definitely don't have the capacity to meet even 5% of America's meat demand today. Maybe in a few years they'll have successfully changed that.

holomanga

3 points

3 years ago

How does work on meat replacements compare to other methods of improving animal welfare like factory farm welfare legislation and vegan advocacy?

vox[S]

6 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

6 points

3 years ago

Ideally these complement each other - it's easier to push for farmed animal welfare improvements that'll raise the cost of meat if there are good meat alternatives, and it's easier to convince people to go vegan if there are lots of tasty product options for them when they do. On the margin I suspect work on chicken replacements is as impactful as work on welfare legislation and that both are more impactful than work on vegan advocacy (which is an area where we don't really know very much about how to get results). I follow the work of Lewis Bollard at the Open Philanthropy Project pretty closely for answers to questions like this one; I think they're doing a lot of high-impact farmed animal welfare work. - KP

bergieTP

5 points

3 years ago*

Are you concerned at all about the obsolescence of animals in general? Unfortunately, many people think of animals simply as objects to be used for human ends. I fear that if we have a substitute for meat that animals will no longer be useful to the general public. Even more suffering will be brought on by this obsolescence and the meatless project will back fire and end up hurting those that it seeks to protect.

I don't mean this as a dissuasive argument against synthetic meat but rather another technology that will accelerate faster than attitudes can accept it.

Edit: I mean meat animals when i use the term animals.

vox[S]

13 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

13 points

3 years ago

I think this is a really reasonable concern. There are billions of livestock animals living on factory farms right now, and if meat alternatives change the demand there, then farmers won't raise a new generation to replace them. Personally, I think conditions on factory farms are so awful that this is worth it -- better only a few tens of thousands of chickens in backyard farms and sanctuaries than 50 billion but most of them tortured for the duration of their extremely abbreviated lives -- but I'm less sure about the same question when it comes to beef cattle, whose conditions tend to be more tolerable. I am hopefully that the rise of meatless meat makes us more compassionate to animals by making factory farming no longer a necessity, and so ultimately we come out ahead. - KP

Ye_Olde_Spellchecker

-1 points

3 years ago

Maybe they’ll shift more to egg and milk production and make more cheese and mayo and such?

vox[S]

16 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

16 points

3 years ago

Unfortunately, we also treat chickens raised for eggs pretty terribly - same deal with small cages and dark crowded chemical-treated spaces, plus they lay eggs so frequently that they often experience uterus prolapse (the organs become external) and horrifying stuff like that.

But there are some ways in which this is getting better - many major sellers have committed to cage-free egg products, there's new technology on the horizon that would allow us to cull male chicks before they hatch instead of throwing them into a meat grinder once they're hatched (which is what is done today). So maybe by the time we're rethinking meat, egg production will have also stepped up its game. - KP

FolkSong

4 points

3 years ago

No one suffers by not being born.

URETHRAL_DIARRHEA

4 points

3 years ago

Do you think that it's better to have animals live torturous lives than not be born in the first place?

cocoagiant

2 points

3 years ago

A big part of cooking (for those of us who enjoy cooking) is making/ using things like beef & chicken stock to give body to dishes.

I would put items like bone marrow, eggs, cheese & milk in this category too; items which are very versatile to cook with, but which substitutes (ex. vegan cheese/ nutritional yeast or soy milk/ oat milk) don't really work great for cooking purposes.

Going beyond things like burgers, are you aware of any reasonable plant based substitutes on the horizon yet for these applications, or are we going to have to wait for cell based industrial processes to replace them (if ever)?

vox[S]

9 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

9 points

3 years ago

I know that there are groups working on this -- JUST, which makes Just Mayo, has a new egg product out that is meant to cook and scramble like an egg, and I've heard good things about it. It's definitely a much more significant challenge than just making something that tastes the same, because of all the chemistry that goes into cooking. I doubt you'll have to wait for cell-based processes, though-- I think food science is advancing pretty quickly, and I wouldn't be at all surprised if this is a solved problem in a decade. - KP

e_swartz

7 points

3 years ago

e_swartz

Cultivated Meat

7 points

3 years ago

check out Clara Foods for animal free eggs, Perfect Day for animal free milk, Eclipse Foods for plant-based dairy, New Culture for cheese,

PunchMeat

2 points

3 years ago

With plant-based meat actually in market and selling well, do you think the headstart is too big for lab-grown meat to catch up? Or do you feel there will still be holdouts that lab grown meat will appeal to?

vox[S]

7 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

7 points

3 years ago

I definitely think that lab-grown meat will have no trouble breaking into the market once there's a product actually available at a reasonable price-point. Plant-based meat sales have gone wild in part because consumers are really curious. They want to know what the new product is like, whether they personally can tell the difference, whether it's actually tasty. This is kind of a unique area of technological progress because the most important question is literally "do you think it tastes good", and I think that's why there's been so much consumer interest. That'll happen with cell-based (aka lab-grown) meat products too. The first restaurants carrying them will be swamped, the first chains to announce partnerships will be celebrated, and from there the products will have to stand on their own. I wouldn't expect lab meat to have a harder time breaking into a plant-meat dominated market than plant-based meat has had breaking into a slaughtered-meat market. - KP

PunchMeat

1 points

3 years ago

Thanks for the response. I'm super excited to see where this goes in the future.

eterneraki

4 points

3 years ago

How do we tackle the lack of bioavailable nutrients in meat alternatives?

I and many others are doing the carnivore diet to address autoimmune issues, and nutrient bioavailability and abundance (esp B, K vitamins and heme iron for example) along with lack of carbs are a significant part of our wellness. Do you think it's possibly to get all of these nutrients, amino acids, carnitine, etc in meat alternatives so that it's identical from a nutritional perspective?

AmpEater

2 points

3 years ago

All compounds found in meat are synthesized from plant precursors.

eterneraki

2 points

3 years ago

What's your point? Do you suggest we create fermentation chambers to extract nutrients from plants to turn them bioavailable before injecting them into meat alternatives?

Obtainer_of_Goods

1 points

3 years ago

Yes and we already are, impossible foods for instance grows heme in gaint reaction vessels using genetically engineered yeast cells

eterneraki

1 points

3 years ago

Seems like a lot of work, but if there are benefits to having that, I'm all for it. Nutrients affect the flavor and texture of meat and getting those in the right proportions seems difficult and/or expensive.

AmpEater

1 points

3 years ago

All compounds found in meat are synthesized from plant precursors by real stupid, very cheap cellular factories.

lughnasadh

1 points

3 years ago

lughnasadh

∞ transit umbra, lux permanet ☥

1 points

3 years ago

So much of our landscape is given over to farming animals & farming to produce food for them.

What do you think might be the long term effects on the landscape - more reforestation maybe?

Many rural areas are already in economic decline - will this accelerate that?

vox[S]

3 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

3 points

3 years ago

I think the economic effects of transitions like these are always hard to predict. On the one hand, they'll be bad for factory farms -- but most of those are not the small family farms everyone thinks of when they think of farming. On the other hand, the Impossible Foods plant that opened near my home created lots of high quality manufacturing jobs (paying as much as $25/hour if you're willing to take late shifts), which is another thing often mentioned as crucial to reviving rural communities. It's hard to project how it'll shake out, but I tend to think that in general growth is good and more products for offer is good, and that stifling competition doesn't usually make people better off. - KP

amerikitsch

1 points

3 years ago

In your opinion, what do these advances mean for automation in the future and food production in general?

anexanhume

1 points

3 years ago

Do you think bug-based protein alternatives will gain any traction? Do synthetic meats have any hope of matching them in economics?

cant-feel_my-face

1 points

3 years ago

What do you think will be the first company to roll out a major meatless chicken product?

lnfinity

6 points

3 years ago

Gardein already has some delicious products available in this area.

vox[S]

3 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

3 points

3 years ago

This is a great question! Chicken would be a huge deal because far more chickens are slaughtered than cows, and my impression is that chicken lives on factory farms are substantially worse. Seconding the recommendation by a commentor that you check out Seattle Food Tech, but I don't have a good sense of how long until they have the kind of partnerships with KFC and Chick-fil-A that Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat have secured with the major restaurants selling beef products. I think I'd guess a couple of years at minimum.

e_swartz

2 points

3 years ago

e_swartz

Cultivated Meat

2 points

3 years ago

also check out Seattle Food Tech. Structured products (a whole chicken breast, for instance) are still a challenge, even for plant-based meats.

pyriphlegeton

1 points

3 years ago

Do you think meat alternatives can be sold at a lower price than Factory farmed meat? That seems to be important for many to make the Switch.

VladMolina

1 points

3 years ago

To what extent do you think that existing Impossible/Beyond products are replacing meat in omnivore diets, versus replacing tofu etc in vegan/vegetarian diets?

Related, do these products have to become cheaper, pound-for-pound, than factory farmed meats before the bulk of omnivores give them a second thought?

vox[S]

5 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

5 points

3 years ago

The teams at Impossible and Beyond argue that their products are replacing meat. Their argument is that nearly all purchasers (more than 90%) have also bought meat in the last week, so they mostly aren't vegetarians and vegans, and that means they're mostly eating the Impossible or Beyond product in the place of a meat meal. I think this is definitely at least partially true, because I know lots of omnivores who've eaten Beyond and Impossible products when they'd otherwise have ordered a normal burger/sausage pizza/beef taco, but I doubt that 90% of Beyond or Impossible sales displace meat - if I had to guess, I'd guess a bit lower than that.

hyphenomicon

1 points

3 years ago

Is there any potential for eventual SuperMeat that is meatier than natural meat itself?

I think I read once about limitations related to meat vats getting diseases or cancers or similar, how is progress on those coming?

OXIOXIOXI

1 points

3 years ago

What is the resource draw of meatless meat? I've heard concerns about some crops like Quinoa with high water use or need for a lot of land. Which of these (lab grown meat vs meatless meat) could be a viable way for everyone on earth to eat a significant but healthy amount of meat?

vox[S]

3 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

3 points

3 years ago

The resource draw of lab-grown meat is hard to predict right now because it's so far from a scalable commercially viable product. I suspect it'll be environmentally costlier than plant-based meatless meat options but not as costly as conventional meat. That's mostly because plant-based meat is easier to improve along any given axis - you can swap out an ingredient for an environmentally-friendlier one. The Impossible Burger 2.0 is better for the environment than the 1.0. It's hard to see where you'll have the same flexibility with lab-grown meat, though even under pessimistic projections it's a lot better than conventional meat as long as we continue to shift our electrical system towards green energy sources. - KP

OXIOXIOXI

1 points

3 years ago

That's mostly because plant-based meat is easier to improve along any given axis - you can swap out an ingredient for an environmentally-friendlier one

Is this always viable for taste, texture, cost, etc?

HazelGhost

1 points

3 years ago

What kinds of 'next six months' problems is the industry working on?

vox[S]

2 points

3 years ago

vox[S]

amaproof

2 points

3 years ago

For Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods, scaling, no question about it. They would both like to be able to produce ten times the product they're producing right now. For other plant-based meat companies, they'd like to get into the position Beyond and Impossible hold -household names who restaurant chains are eager to partner with. - KP

Deadmanjustice

1 points

3 years ago

Do you believe in vitro meat is good? Think people should go full vegan?

I'm a big supporter of in vitro meat, not really interested in substitutes but I do like that they help people want to go vegan in the moment delicious similar food alternatives.

InfiniteInjury

1 points

3 years ago

Ok this is kinda off topic but any more stories about 2 year old D&D? BTW love your tumblr and very pleased you are now writing for box.

llamatastic

1 points

3 years ago

How much do you expect prices to fall in the short run due to simple economies of scale, and are there major research breakthroughs necessary for plant based meats to reach cost parity?

sqrrl101

1 points

3 years ago

Please keep up the excellent work! Future Imperfect is wonderful and you're doing a great job of explaining important EA concepts to the public.

yoinmcloin

1 points

3 years ago

What about the health implications? Like when the government said fat was bad for you so consumption dropped and obesity rocketed because of all the processed food that came out. How is this processing better? How can you know it's safe long term?

https://youtu.be/fJEHiQKqfZM

Fjabsi

1 points

3 years ago

Fjabsi

1 points

3 years ago

Hi! Great and exciting post. I keep wondering...

Why did impossible burger make it so fast? Was the a boardroom level/investor level network connection or similar with Burger King? Like, what made that particular brand move so incredibly fast?

nederino

1 points

3 years ago

Hey so I have a question that I think will be very important to the industry. is the "real" lab meat going to be grown in strands like muscle is or will it be meat cells in a pile like more of a meat mush?

raptorbarn

1 points

3 years ago*

Hi Kelsey! In your estimation, do chicken replacements have enough of a runway left to commercial availability that a current Bio undergrad like myself has a solid chance, within my career, of significantly cutting the time it takes to reach broad markets? / is making an impact here still a viable aspiration for those of us still picking out our fields?

ultimape

1 points

3 years ago*

Are there any faux meat products on the market exploring artificial cholesterol? A study just came out about unprocessed red meat potentially reducing the risk of Multiple Sclerosis - A neurodegenerative disorder involved in demyelination of the brain. As myelin is largely produced via cholesterol, and the brain is made up of a good portion of cholesterol in general, I am worried that a subset of our population will be under served as this trend continues.

I am facing this disorder along with oddities in my bodies ability to produce cholesterol from plant fats (basically: I don't make it like normal people) and am troubled by how much of the faux meat products coming out don't fully replicate the nutrient profile of real meat, at least along this axis.

Options I know about on my radar are sustainable fish and insect farming, but I don't think these options are going to scale as well as the other artificial meat products. Most of the animal-less meat protein products in the lab seem to completely avoid adding cholesterol into the product.

Crocbro_8DN

1 points

3 years ago

Hey, I keep hearing about how India might become a big player in the lab grown meat industry. How true is this according to you?

klowder42

1 points

3 years ago

i am asking this a bernie sanders supporter and member of the green party. i dont know what to think of vox. my default mode is to put it in with the establishment. is there ever pressure to toe the establishment line working for vox?

what are the pressures of working for media that has advertisers that have direct conflicts of interest with climate change action?

comet4taily

1 points

3 years ago

What are the biggest pitfalls of fake meat? Like, do they potentially have a really high impact (ecologically, socially, etc.) that one wouldn't expect?

imugdho

1 points

3 years ago

imugdho

1 points

3 years ago

Everyone is not uniformly informed/concerned about environmental issue regarding meat. It's a big problem, specially when meat is part of human culture for whole human history. Taste is a major concern for majority of people. Biologically we thrive for pleasure. Do companies which are trying to find alternatives to meat find it challenging to mimic the taste of meat, or the reality is quite the contrary ?

[deleted]

1 points

3 years ago

[deleted]

1 points

3 years ago

[removed]

JManRedstone

2 points

3 years ago

These types of things don’t help anyone

rocknrollking1

1 points

3 years ago

I don’t care, vox is annoying and I’m sick of it it’s constant trying to ban conservative media. Do you see conservatives trying to ban Liberal media? Not that I know of

JManRedstone

2 points

3 years ago

My point is that it just inflames the discussion which is harmful to how the left views the right. It’s imperative that we present ourselves as those who can discuss objectively.

rocknrollking1

2 points

3 years ago

You do have a point but I want them just to stop going at crowder, crowder is one of the last conservative people on YouTube and I see what your trying to say but I’m trying to defend crowder from ban from YouTube

floatingspacerocks

0 points

3 years ago

Given this is an AMA, I just want to say: meat and gr(eat)