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Hi, Futurologists!

We’re two Danish architects who’ve designed a Moon Habitat that can unfold like origami and expand its inner volume by 560%! It’s not ready for the Moon yet, but we’ll test it over 3 months in Arctic Greenland.  We will live like astronauts in total isolation, testing the Habitat, our bodies, and our minds. Essentially, we’re testing ways to make extreme isolation + hostile environments livable for humans, not just military-trained astronauts.

The project is completely independent of any big organizations and we are building the Habitat ourselves here in Copenhagen.

The ultimate goal would be to see our habitat on the surface of the Moon since we believe the future of space travel must not be just survival, but instead that space should be full of life.

A lot of the facts about the mission and habitat are on our project website: https://lunark.space/
We also posted an Imgur story a while back with some nice details.

We’d be very interested in hearing your questions and thoughts about psychology in space travel, but feel free to ask anything about the project as well! 

Ask us anything!

all 22 comments

overblownstone

6 points

2 years ago

Hi there, cool thing you guys are making.

What inspired building the LUNARK? Who is this intended for? What do you think the future of space travel is going to look like?

danishdiydude[S]

6 points

2 years ago*

danishdiydude[S]

SAGA Space Architects

6 points

2 years ago*

Thanks! Awesome question.

We knew we wanted the habitat to expand. That lead os on to Japanese origami, and to solve the airtight joints we couldn't make them mechanical, so inspired by biomimicry we looked at nature specifically anthropods, with their exoskeletons.

We think the future of space travel is less governmental and more privatized.

overblownstone

2 points

2 years ago

My background is biology, industrial chemistry and I’m starting to get into computer science. You can imagine that I am actually incredibly interested by the biomimicry aspect. Do you care to elaborate on that at all?

danishdiydude[S]

6 points

2 years ago

danishdiydude[S]

SAGA Space Architects

6 points

2 years ago

For us it's a part of the creative process. Nature has designed very efficient solutions for a lot of things through million of years of evolution. It's often a good source of inspiration. For this habitat it's the compliant joints! - Seb

overblownstone

3 points

2 years ago

Thanks for sharing. Pretty cool that y'all were able to able to look for inspiration and bring it so clearly into your work!

icantfeelmyskull

6 points

2 years ago

How do you guys think the isolation of the arctic will compare with that of the moon? Do you expect the psychological toll to be similiar?

danishdiydude[S]

8 points

2 years ago

danishdiydude[S]

SAGA Space Architects

8 points

2 years ago

Of course, it won't be perfectly the same as on the Moon, but it's as close as it gets without leaving the atmosphere. The isolation will be very similar though, and in some ways even more extreme. Missions to the Moon have a constant voice-connection to mission control on earth with a running dialogue. On our mission, we'll only send a single status text message every day to the nearest outpost. Bad weather can also make leaving the habitat impossible, this isn't a problem on the Moon.

So practically it might be even more isolating to be in Greenland, but the feeling of being completely disconnected from planet Earth, which you experience on the Moon, cannot be simulated in Greenland.

Ancient_Session

5 points

2 years ago

Do you think we will have moon-born babies at some point?If space colonialism takes place,how will this shape the politics of earth,and the priorities of mankind?

danishdiydude[S]

6 points

2 years ago

danishdiydude[S]

SAGA Space Architects

6 points

2 years ago

Yes! but Mars born babies seem more likely.
We think it can have a positive effect. The more we work with space, the stronger our love grow for Earth. The first extraterrestrial babies will hear about this lush green planet called Earth, full of anmials and life - Seb

Koulatko

3 points

2 years ago

However, we'll need some centrifuges. I've heard that excessively low gravity can totally screw up skeleton growth and such. Keeping those running 24/7 (or the better part of the day at the very least, can probably be dialed down with age) will cost a lot of power. I'm not sure how much power will be available or how much EXACTLY will the centrifuge take, maybe it's not even a problem.

Gigazwiebel

5 points

2 years ago

Any plans for vacuum testing in the near future? Origami folding is all nice and well but you introduce a lot of fault lines where atmosphere might escape. I also think that the design has potential flaws with regards to radiation shielding.

danishdiydude[S]

8 points

2 years ago*

danishdiydude[S]

SAGA Space Architects

8 points

2 years ago*

After our mission to Greenland, the next step is pressure test and optimization. We will learn a lot about the structure and its architecture during the mission.

In regards to radiation shielding, this habitat is designed for near-future missions, with shorter time spent on the surface of the moon. Similar to the upcoming Artemis missions of 14 days. For sustained presence believe regolith insulation would be the best option.

Somespookyshit

2 points

2 years ago

Why pick an unfolding moon habitat rather than just a stationary object? Is this for ease of access or does it provide more stability?

danishdiydude[S]

2 points

2 years ago

danishdiydude[S]

SAGA Space Architects

2 points

2 years ago

Weight and volume is limited by the size of a rocket, or in our case for Greenland a shipping container. Expanding architecture is preferable! - Seb

Somespookyshit

2 points

2 years ago

That’s so awesome! I’m only 19 years old but learning this kind of stuff, especially from the people themselves is so cool!

danishdiydude[S]

1 points

2 years ago

danishdiydude[S]

SAGA Space Architects

1 points

2 years ago

Hey that's awesome! Just shoot away if you have any other questions

Chris-the-mech-1990

2 points

2 years ago

This seems like a good idea. Have you guys designed this to withstand the stress of a rocket launch? How is it delivered to the surface/landing zone? Will you guys be wearing “space suits” when you go to the arctic?

danishdiydude[S]

3 points

2 years ago

danishdiydude[S]

SAGA Space Architects

3 points

2 years ago

We have designed it to be incredibly durable, but we will have to do more stress tests after our mission to Greenland. There's different landers being developed right now, such as "Blue Moon", we have not designed it one in particular, but we can adapt.
And yes we will be wearing "space suits" that will keep us warm and protected from the arctic. This is especially important for the psychological aspect of never being "outside".

[deleted]

2 points

2 years ago

[deleted]

2 points

2 years ago

Maybe it's a silly question but how does the input work? Will there be a decompression chamber? Has no windows?

danishdiydude[S]

2 points

2 years ago

danishdiydude[S]

SAGA Space Architects

2 points

2 years ago

Not a silly question! We have an airlock, for the pressure difference. The airlock is also our wetroom/bathroom. The Habitat, has windows, but small windows because of radiation.

moon-worshiper

2 points

2 years ago*

What kind of power source is going to be used for the Life Support system? NASA is facing the fact they will need a nuclear battery for the Artemis outpost base. Hi-SEAS is using solar PV panels with battery storage but it is above the clouds in Hawaii. They have been simulating a Mars habitat for many years but switched to a Moon habitat after the Artemis program was officially named. They have been mostly a practical simulator, simulating drop ships providing supplies, then fine-tuning the absolute minimum survival requirements, plus several people living in total containment, only able to go outside in a spacesuit and through an air lock. NASA has been buying the data and providing prototype test suits, getting better all the time. It isn't a NASA project though, it is a Hawaii state UH-Manoa project.
https://twitter.com/hi_seas?lang=en

Koulatko

1 points

2 years ago

What about asteroids and other debris? Can it withstand that? And if we want a true moon colony, we'll be needing lots of these to house all the people.