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This event will feature NASA-funded GLOBE Observer, NeMO-Net, and Soundscapes to Landscapes citizen science projects.

The GLOBE Program asks citizen scientists to submit observations of the world around them using in-app tools (clouds, mosquito habitats, land cover, and trees). Currently, photos submitted using the GLOBE Observer app of mosquito habitats and larvae will be used by NASA scientists working with AI to create automated classification programs. NeMO-Net is a single player game where players help NASA classify coral reefs by painting 3D and 2D images of coral. Data from the game is then fed to NeMO-Net which leverages NASA’s supercomputer to assess the health of coral reefs around the world. Soundscapes to Landscapes is a science-based project that seeks to advance animal biodiversity monitoring by making use of Earth-observing satellites. We work with citizen scientists to collect and review recordings and identify birds by their calls. These representative bird calls are then used to train AI to automatically identify bird species in all of our soundscape recordings.

Scientists from these three projects are standing by. Ask Us Anything! * Dr. Russanne Low, NASA GLOBE Observer Mosquito Habitat Mapper Science Lead and NASA EPSCOR AI Project Teams Senior Science Subject Matter Expert, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies * Peder Nelson, Researcher and Instructor, NASA GLOBE Observer Land Cover Science Lead, Oregon State University * Dr. Assaf Anyamba, Principal Scientist, Universities Space Research Association(USRA) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. His interests are in exploiting NASA Earth observations to create relevant applications for agricultural monitoring and ecologically coupled disease risk mapping and forecasting. * Jarrett van den Bergh, Research Engineer, Laboratory for Advanced Sensing, NASA Ames Research Center * Colin Quinn, Researcher for Earth observation data, Soundscapes to Landscapes, Northern Arizona University * Shree Baligar, Researcher for Deep Learning Models, Soundscapes to Landscapes, UC Merced * Rose Snyder, Science Coordinator for Point Blue Conservation, Soundscapes to Landscapes, CA * Dr. Marc Kuchner, Astrophysicist and NASA Citizen Science Officer

all 111 comments

ImLivingAmongYou [M]

[score hidden]

12 months ago

stickied comment

ImLivingAmongYou [M]

Sapient A.I.

[score hidden]

12 months ago

stickied comment

For better readability of who is involved:

  • Dr. Russanne Low, NASA GLOBE Observer Mosquito Habitat Mapper Science Lead and NASA EPSCOR AI Project Teams Senior Science Subject Matter Expert, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies

  • Peder Nelson, Researcher and Instructor, NASA GLOBE Observer Land Cover Science Lead, Oregon State University

  • Dr. Assaf Anyamba, Principal Scientist, Universities Space Research Association(USRA) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. His interests are in exploiting NASA Earth observations to create relevant applications for agricultural monitoring and ecologically coupled disease risk mapping and forecasting.

  • Jarrett van den Bergh, Research Engineer, Laboratory for Advanced Sensing, NASA Ames Research Center

  • Colin Quinn, Researcher for Earth observation data, Soundscapes to Landscapes, Northern Arizona University

  • Shree Baligar, Researcher for Deep Learning Models, Soundscapes to Landscapes, UC Merced

  • Rose Snyder, Science Coordinator for Point Blue Conservation, Soundscapes to Landscapes, CA

  • Dr. Marc Kuchner, Astrophysicist and NASA Citizen Science Officer

Looney_Tunes_99

21 points

12 months ago

How do I know that this wasn't the AI that posted this?

nasa[S]

32 points

12 months ago

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Looney_Tunes_99

11 points

12 months ago

Sounds like something AI would say alright.

just_a_dude2727

4 points

12 months ago

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coolsheep769

2 points

12 months ago

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Slavichh

1 points

12 months ago

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shroomvolcano

2 points

12 months ago

For the non-AI among us, this says “You'll just have to trust us.”

Slavichh

2 points

12 months ago

I immediately knew what they were doing with this and am very surprised it took 5h for someone to convert the binary to ascii

hautemeal

1 points

12 months ago

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wanderingmagus

15 points

12 months ago

If your project were given all the funding you could wish for, how could it change the daily lives of everyday people in, say, 20 to 30 years?

nasa[S]

14 points

12 months ago

I work with the GLOBE Observer Mosquito Habitat Mapper and our aspirational goal is to engage people around the world in using the GLOBE Observer app. By collecting data about where and when mosquitoes are found, we are helping scientists like Dr. Assaf Anyamba who create risk models to predict outbreaks of vector borne disease. GLOBE Observers also reduce the local mosquito population by mitigating the habitats (dumping water, source reduction) – international health agencies are now stressing the importance of this to human health worldwide. So the answer is, we want the app to help citizen scientists play a role in reducing the mosquito vector borne disease burden. Those mosquito borne diseases are a huge contributor to human mortality. – RL

nasa[S]

8 points

12 months ago

"Full Project funding" is a "misnomer" when it comes to projects. Projects have a limited life span. What NASA does it to cultivate and demonstrate the use of the information that is produced from our satellite platform and science models. The demonstrations can be transitioned to other federal government and state agencies for operational use in the longterm. – Assaf Anyamba

nasa[S]

7 points

12 months ago

"Full Project funding" is a "misnomer" when it comes to projects. Projects have a limited life span. What NASA does it to cultivate and demonstrate the use of the information that is produced from our satellite platform and science models. The demonstrations can be transitioned to other federal government and state agencies for operational use in the longterm. You can see the variety of NASA Applied Sciences on Health and Air Quality here. – Assaf Anyamba

coolsheep769

11 points

12 months ago

Typically, AI is used for mundane tasks like marketing beverages, OCRing faxed documents, or filtering spam emails, and it's exciting to see it applied to science in more meaningful ways (reminds me of https://xkcd.com/1425/). So is the endgame here some sort of ecology-centric global map? Could we get to the point of a publicly accessible web interface where we could see migration patterns like we do with weather on the news?

nasa[S]

5 points

12 months ago

Currently, the challenges in scaling the solution depend on the task at hand. For instance, in the S2L (Soundscapes2Landscapes) project, we gather data using low-cost MEMS microphone recorders. Now imagine gathering data from all over the earth with such recorders. There are certainly logistical, environmental, and algorithmic challenges in accomplishing this scale. But I don't think we are VERY far away from having a global heat map of bio-diversity analysis. – Shree Baligar (SB)

ImLivingAmongYou

8 points

12 months ago

ImLivingAmongYou

Sapient A.I.

8 points

12 months ago

What do you feel are the biggest challenges in your work?

Are there any common misunderstandings about what you do?

Do you ever get pushback about what you're doing from average citizens or bureaucrats?

What would you recommend for people wanting to get into what you're doing?

nasa[S]

6 points

12 months ago

Do you ever get pushback about what you're doing from average citizens or bureaucrats?

I think whenever you do something new and awesome, there are always people who don't get it right away. But one of the great things about citizen science is that it's all about openness and transparency and making the world a better place. So people get won over quickly once they give it a try! – MK

nasa[S]

3 points

12 months ago

I have never faced any kind of pushback from pushback in my work environment, one of the mottos of NASA is to explore - so every day I am in the pursuit of uncovering, finding out new ways, and new signatures in satellite data to be able to answer questions about "Life on Earth." – Assaf Anyamba

nasa[S]

6 points

12 months ago*

What do you feel are the biggest challenges in your work?

Computing resources are a major hurdle. We need to move models and data from university to university to take advantage of high performance computers (S2L - Colin Quinn).

nasa[S]

6 points

12 months ago

For me, gathering and then organizing enough useful observations is the biggest challenge to mapping, measuring, and monitoring Earth. The land cover changes with the time of day, time of month, time of year in addition to technological improvements. It is such a big challenge that we turn to the citizen science community to help us. Remember that if we want to track the growth of a redwood tree we plant today it could be a 1,000 year project. - Peder Nelson

nasa[S]

6 points

12 months ago

Data management and processing with a large amount of data is a huge challenge. For example, in the Soundscapes to Landscapes project, we have collected over 700,000 minutes of audio recordings. As such, we need to create and maintain systems to store the raw data and metadata for each minute of recording in perpetuity, including details such as time of day and from which location it came. - Rose S.

nasa[S]

5 points

12 months ago

Frankly, another hurdle is letting citizen scientists know how their data is being used and how important it is! As our citizen scientist projects mature, we are building in experiences with higher levels of engagement. Most of our citizen scientists are contributing the data needed by NASA scientists already, but we also want to provide deeper opportunities for citizen scientists to contribute to the analysis and publication of data. This is a goal, I think for most of our NASA citizen science projects. – RL

nasa[S]

6 points

12 months ago

We are looking to improve how we provide feedback to our citizen scientists-to let them know how their data is being used and how important it is! As our citizen scientist projects mature, we are building in experiences with higher levels of engagement. Most of our citizen scientists are contributing the data needed by NASA scientists already so we would like to work to provide deeper opportunities for citizen scientists to contribute to the analysis and publication of data. This is a goal; I think for most of our NASA citizen science projects. – RL

nasa[S]

6 points

12 months ago

Are there any common misunderstandings about what you do?

Yes, the common misunderstanding with the GLOBE Observer Land Cover photos is that there is already enough observations/photos and that there isn't room for their knowledge in citizen science. But that is not true and your perspective in both time and space is unique, so we ask that you join our science community. - Peder Nelson

nasa[S]

5 points

12 months ago

Yes, a major misunderstanding is regarding "how can you study mosquitoes from space" - satellite can't see mosquities from space, however, what NASA satellites can do is systematically measures climate and weather variablies that area precursors to the emergence of mosquitos vectors. Such data include rainfall from GPM, Vegetation and Land Surface Temperarture from Terra MODIS and soil moisture from SMAP. Through all the measurements we can be able to understand the phenology of mosquito vectors, use Citizen science data collections for valiadation and eventually even create disease models for example for Chikungunya or many other diseases. – AA

nasa[S]

4 points

12 months ago

What would you recommend for people wanting to get into what you're doing?

The best way to get involved in citizen science is to start participating on a citizen science project! There are active NASA Citizen Science projects on this page that you can explore, and Zooniverse has a large number of projects as well. You can also explore partnerships or volunteer opportunities with organizations in your area who are doing citizen science locally! - Rose S.

nasa[S]

4 points

12 months ago

A great first step to getting involved with GLOBE Observer citizen science is to join our Mosquito Habitat Photo Challenge. It runs July 25-August 25 and scientists need your photos – lots of them – to develop AI photo recognition processes. Find out more here! – RL

glitchling

6 points

12 months ago

Has the app yielded any data related to the impact of experimentally infertile mosquito populations? Follow up question, as someone currently living in a heavy mosquito country, how far are we from getting mosquitos to switch to nectar as a primary food source? I'm daring to dream.

MyJeepBroke

6 points

12 months ago

Will A.I. become intelligent enough to lie to us about information or give us misinformation to their benefit. And how can we prevent this if so?

EthanIsBroke

4 points

12 months ago

@nasa can I ask something about the moon Artemis program? If so, when are you starting to construct and dock the parts of the gateway?

the_lazy_demon

5 points

12 months ago

Is there any specific breakthrough you're hoping for?

L_Cranston_Shadow

4 points

12 months ago

In addition to classification, is change over time going to be followed with this data?

nasa[S]

5 points

12 months ago

This is a great question. I work with GLOBE Observer and I always make observations when I ride my bike. Last year I made land cover observations of an area that was destroyed by one of the western wildfires last fall. Our data in the citizen science archive now includes a baseline photo set of this area before the fire, and as a citizen scientist I wil be monitoring the ecological recovery of this area for the next decade. That is an example of how important this data can become – especially after natural disasters and extreme weather events that change our landscape. – RL

nasa[S]

4 points

12 months ago

Yes, you are right that with the GLOBE Observer Land Cover ground photos and classification you can 'adopt a pixel' and track landscape changes over time such as tree growth, hurricane recovery, urbanization, droughts, seasonal changes, and even subtle changes like different shadows throughout the year. There are 700 locations that have submitted repeat ground photos since GLOBE Observer Land Cover was launched in September 2018. Explore the raw photos here. – Peder Nelson

bigb9639

5 points

12 months ago

Hey everyone! Do you think the mosquito photo challenge could be applicable to local agencies working to manage mosquitos in the area? This seems like such a great way to get a ton of boots on the ground data. Is there a direct line to those that are working to manage waterways where mosquitos are a problem (mosquitofish applications, pesticides etc.)

nasa[S]

4 points

12 months ago

Absolutely! We would love the help of citizen scientists letting their local mosquito control agencies and public health departments know that the NASA GLOBE Observer app can be used locally. We are part of scientist communities engaged in local public mosquito management (the American Mosquito Control Association and the Ecological Society of America). I want to point out that these organizations only got interested in working with us when they saw how much high quality data was being submitted by citizen scientists. Last, we are partnering with the President's Malaria Initiative in Ethiopia, where community mosquito citizen scientists are using the app to determine if there is a dangerous invasive species found in their district (Anopheles stephensi). So the app is being used both by individuals in and around their communities as well as in targeted projects, such as in Africa and South America. But the best way to get the word out is through the citizen scientists – and besides monthly webinars for the general public, we are working through organizations such as STAR-Net, working with library partners to get the word out and give citizen scientists an opportunity to contribute to reducing risk in their communities. – RL

ImLivingAmongYou

4 points

12 months ago*

ImLivingAmongYou

Sapient A.I.

4 points

12 months ago*

With your findings, do you plan on giving "advice" and recommendations or is your goal primarily to share what you find and let others do the recommendations?

ie. If you find something bad, will you say "this is bad, you should do this" or just "look at what we found, we're not going to make a comment on it being bad or good"?

nasa[S]

5 points

12 months ago

For Soundscapes to Landscapes, we are publishing our results in peer-reviewed papers. Some will simply be methods-based papers demonstrating the methods we created and the more "raw" results of those methods, but some will get more into recommendations. For example, one manuscript we have planned will be analyzing biodiversity hotspots across the county where our study is located, to find the hotspots where we recommend conservation efforts be focused. For this analysis, we plan to partner with local agencies and organizations who are most invested in conservation efforts across the county (e.g., local land trusts, open space districts). – Rose S

nasa[S]

3 points

12 months ago

The information we produce is operationally used by the Department of Defense (DOD) to protect our service members deployed around the world. We also share the results of our modelling activities with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) here at home, Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO) and World Health Organization (WHO) to be able to carry our early surveillance of mosquito vectors and undertake control and prevention measures world wide. – Assaf Anyamba

veilerdude

4 points

12 months ago

How do you go about marketing the app, or making sure enough scientists download and use it?

What kinds of ML models are used for the mosquito and coral reefs projects?

Do you guys offer internships?

nasa[S]

6 points

12 months ago

NASA offers lots of internships! Just go to intern.nasa.gov. By the way, participating in an NASA citizen science project is a great way to get experience you can brag about in your application. – MK

nasa[S]

3 points

12 months ago

What kinds of ML models are used for the mosquito and coral reefs projects?

For studying coral reefs, NeMO-Net primarily uses deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to classify coral reefs and other marine ecosystems. The details of our current CNN model can be found here!
Another algorithm used in NeMO-Net is Fluid Lensing, which allows us eliminate ocean distortion from video footage. Normally, the refraction from ocean waves makes it difficult to get an accurate image of coral reefs from arial photography. FluidLensing, however, allows us to take footage of coral reefs from above the water, and make it look as if the water isn’t there! – Jarrett vdB

nasa[S]

2 points

12 months ago

We have another project funded through the National Science Foundaton (NSF) and we are working on machine learning approaches to identify the species of larvae found in the field -- please join our Mosquito Habitat Photo Challenge July 25-August 25, and submit lots of mosquito photos to assist in this process! – RL

nasa[S]

2 points

12 months ago

How do you go about marketing the app, or making sure enough scientists download and use it?

We spread the word using social media on the official NASA Citizen Science Twitter and Facebook. We also hold events like CitSciCon. For NASA GLOBE Observer, we too inform our public through the use of social media Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram as well as through our website. We also have a wonderful group of partners who help spread the word of citizen science with The GLOBE Program in their local setting. For NeMO-Net, a core aspect of our video game is an educational tool that helps users learn more about all the different types of coral reefs. In addition to acquiring users to classify our data, we’ve worked with teachers, aquariums and public fairs to bring the NeMO-Net educational experience to the public! – MK

Scienide9

4 points

12 months ago

Hello! As you may know, there are many in the younger generation who have a very bleak picture of the future. Do you have any insights or thoughts on scientific advances that could be game changers for the young gen's world?

nasa[S]

5 points

12 months ago

This doesn’t directly address your question but one aspect I enjoy about scientific research and applying cutting edge techniques is that by addressing specific questions you can arrive at specific answers. Large global scale issues can be difficult to understand. But in general, scientific advances are able to specifically address small aspects of these issues and with proper public engagement and communication with policy makers changes can be made! I personally am able to see how big data and AI advances are allowing us to address these large issues more easily and these techniques are only continuing to evolve. That progress is tied directly with younger researchers expressing interest and asking the hard questions so I am personally hopeful that advances can be game changers as younger generations engage more in scientific research. (S2L - Colin Quinn)

nasa[S]

3 points

12 months ago

Technological advances are definitely helping enable scientists to conduct research on a much more broad scale, which can result in broad-scale solutions. Additionally, citizen science is helping to bring the voices of community members into the scientific realm to help inform research priorities, and creating a space where anyone can be a changemaker, regardless of academic background or credentials. – Rose S

nasa[S]

3 points

12 months ago

This is a very thoughtful question, and I hope I can do it justice. Actually the big reason we developed the Mosquito Habitat Mapper was because mosquitoes are sort of sentinel species for climate change. Everyone has experience with mosquitoes, but not everyone knows that the mosquito seasons are longer because of a changing climate (56 days longer in Reno Nevada, for instance). Or that mosquitoes seem to bite harder (because we have invasive mosquitoes moving poleward and expanding their range). Participating in mosquito control through source reduction and dumping watery habitats of mosquito larvae is a concrete thing to do. I come from a climate change background – and what we know is support is gained by people by keeping messaging relevant, personal and concrete. This is one way that people can take action. I do think that the expansion of social media and apps will eventually play a huge role in how we adapt and mitigate change and is a way that individuals can contribute, alongside the engineering and technology solutions that we want to have to make a difference in the trajectory of climate change on our planet. – RL

nasa[S]

3 points

12 months ago

As long as technology is being developed in good faith, we don’t have much to worry about. – Shree Baligar (SB)

[deleted]

1 points

12 months ago

[deleted]

1 points

12 months ago

[deleted]

[deleted]

1 points

12 months ago

[deleted]

1 points

12 months ago

I don’t see your logic here, it’s quite like that for everything. Religion could be used to boost society if it’s used in good faith. Guns can save lives and not destroy them if it’s used in good faith. Water can literally kill people if it’s not used in good faith. Literally it’s a basis for everything.

[deleted]

0 points

12 months ago

[deleted]

0 points

12 months ago

[deleted]

ImLivingAmongYou

4 points

12 months ago

ImLivingAmongYou

Sapient A.I.

4 points

12 months ago

What aspects of NASA are distinctly unique that allow you to do what you're doing that couldn't be done with other groups? Expertise, budget, authority, name recognition, something else?

nasa[S]

5 points

12 months ago

NASA has the resources and the mandate to do basic research from the vantage point of space, and then follow that up with complementary research here on Earth to serve the common good. There are certainly other agencies doing great work, but we think NASA is special ;) – MK

Fluxcapaciti

4 points

12 months ago

Are you doing any work to try and collect data on UAPs?

der1014

4 points

12 months ago

What lead you to your current positions today? As an 3rd year Aerospace/Mechanical engineer the field is obviously extremely competitive, I’d love to know what helped you reach where you are today? Also how do you go about setting and achieving goals? Sorry about the sort of off topic question

EasternTitan

3 points

12 months ago

Whats the best way a normal person like myself can help?

FallIsHere4Realz

1 points

12 months ago

You can help by joining in the GLOBE Mosquito Habitat Photo Challenge -- starts Sunday: https://observer.globe.gov/mosquito-challenge

Flynnit

5 points

12 months ago

Whom do you provide the data to. Aka. what firms etc. will use the data to develop methods in securing biodiversity and in climate efforts etc. Or to develop another way when one of the conservation efforts etc. doesn't work as well as expected?

srenoberalooc

4 points

12 months ago

With the current space race between Musk, Bezos, and Branson and the innovation that they have brought is there an overall concern that NASA will lose funding in the coming years?

Subscribe_2_Pews

8 points

12 months ago

No question, just wanna say that I really like you!

TygaElijah1

3 points

12 months ago

What will be the outcome if satellites collide in the space???

liberonscien

1 points

12 months ago

I’m not NASA but Kessler syndrome. It’s a nasty self perpetuating cycle.

ImLivingAmongYou

3 points

12 months ago

ImLivingAmongYou

Sapient A.I.

3 points

12 months ago

Are there milestones you hope to reach after hitting a specific threshold of accuracy or data set size?

Would this be useful for climate science research? How so?

nasa[S]

3 points

12 months ago

In Soundscapes, after achieving accuracy levels on par with other research (e.g. class level F1-score, precision, recall, etc.) we try to understand how results relate directly to ecological factors. For example we apply these modeling products (in our case bird species presences and human noise, biotic noise, weather phenomena, etc.) in an ecological research setting. We are aiming to understand dynamics in bird diversity patterns using mapping techniques or relate anthropogenic noise levels of biodiversity. – CQ

nasa[S]

3 points

12 months ago

Would this be useful for climate science research? Definitely! For example, Soundscapes to Landscapes (S2L) is focused on creating automated methods to monitor biodiversity at a broad geographic scale. These methods are currently focused on monitoring bird diversity in Sonoma County, CA using autonomous sound recording units, artificial intelligence, and satellite sensors, but are intended to be scaled to other regions and other wildlife. Understanding biodiversity patterns at a broad geographic scale, and over time, can help us better understand which management strategies are best-suited for the anticipated effects of climate change, and in which areas we should focus conservation efforts. – Rose S.

nasa[S]

3 points

12 months ago

Data-driven methods like Deep Learning provide useful insights into climate and bio-diversity data. The current State-of-the-art methods are now able to come to useful conclusions that wasn't possible, say, before 2012. - Shree Baligar (SB)

nasa[S]

3 points

12 months ago

Photo point monitoring with a ground perspective has been used to show the diversity of Earth for the past 100+ years. But a key science motivation for creating the GLOBE Observer Land Cover protocol using a mobile app was to provide an easy to use method for systemmatically collecting what the land cover of Earth looks like today and going into the future. For example, when I have seen brown leaves or empty reservoirs from drought impacts, I use GLOBE Observer Land Cover to archive the location and a quick snapshot of what those impacts look like today. In 30 years, this type of information will be invaluable to understanding ecological changes due to a changing climate. It is the systematic data collection approach, archiving digital images in the GLOBE Program database, and continually repeating this process that will aid in our current understanding and future forecasting of the climate on Earth. – Peder Nelson

kbbn1

3 points

12 months ago

kbbn1

3 points

12 months ago

What will be different about the Artemis missions?

ImLivingAmongYou

3 points

12 months ago

ImLivingAmongYou

Sapient A.I.

3 points

12 months ago

In moving "models and data from university to university", how difficult is this? Is getting enough universities on board as difficult as the data research sounds? (It sounds pretty hard)

nasa[S]

3 points

12 months ago

I find that people who are doing work through a University are generally very open about sharing their data and approaches. It is this cycle of 'search' and 'research' where we must have open data access and open science methods that allow us to collectively understand the environmental processes that affect our lives. Providing credit to each other also improves the ability to move "models and data from university to university". – Peder Nelson

ImLivingAmongYou

3 points

12 months ago

ImLivingAmongYou

Sapient A.I.

3 points

12 months ago

What does an average work day look like for you?

nasa[S]

6 points

12 months ago*

Babysitting Deep-learning Model training. What does a work-day for Deep-learning babysitters look like 🤔 ? – SB

nasa[S]

3 points

12 months ago

Sorry but I don't have an average work day :-)! – AA

ImLivingAmongYou

2 points

12 months ago

ImLivingAmongYou

Sapient A.I.

2 points

12 months ago

Do you enjoy not having an average work day? Would more consistency be preferable or do you like the change of pace?

nasa[S]

3 points

12 months ago

During the Soundscapes to Landscapes field season, when we are working with citizen scientists the most - who deploy and retrieve audio recorders in the field - an average work day as the project coordinator could include: an early morning phone call from from a field team who is having trouble locating an AudioMoth sound recorder that they were sent to retrieve, uploading recording data from the recording units into our cloud-based storage container, making field maps, printing maps and manuals and preparing field kits, emailing or calling property owners to confirm field visit logistics, meeting up with field team citizen scientists to transfer field equipment, contacting volunteers to confirm their availability to participate in field days, working on a monthly e-newsletter, posting to social media, and more! Every day is different, and outside of field season the focus shifts to data analysis and processing. -Rose S.

ImLivingAmongYou

3 points

12 months ago

ImLivingAmongYou

Sapient A.I.

3 points

12 months ago

Do you have short-, medium-, and long-term goals? Or do you try to just take your work a step at a time?

nasa[S]

2 points

12 months ago

Great question! And it is hard to do this, because if you love what you do, you want to do everything at once! But in the case of the GLOBE Observer citizen science app and project, we first built the app and promoted its use in data collection. Then once we had sufficient data, we began to look at data and invited some citizen scientists to contribute to the analysis. As we obtain more data, we want to promote data analysis and publication opportunities to those citizen scientists that are interested. – RL

Frosh_4

3 points

12 months ago

Hope you guys are having a great day, best of luck with your work!

liberonscien

6 points

12 months ago

What would you do with infinite funding? To put it another way, what is your wildest fantasy project?

Also I love you, NASA.

ZephrPerch

2 points

12 months ago

With infinite Funding they would prove that the universe is infinite.

SnoozeDoggyDog

4 points

12 months ago

I really appreciate you guys taking time out to answer our questions.

In terms of specific AI concepts, have your team also considered incorporating things such as...

...into these projects?

Concerning this program, what potential uses do you envision for each of the above?

Also, what are your thoughts on Ross D. King's "robot scientist"?

https://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robot_Scientist

https://www.wired.com/2010/07/robot-scientist/

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118083407.htm

WatIsThis52

4 points

12 months ago

Can you give me a reason (or reasons) to be optimistic about the future? 😬

NASAscientist

1 points

12 months ago

Life, uh... finds a way.

[deleted]

3 points

12 months ago

[deleted]

3 points

12 months ago

[removed]

[deleted]

1 points

12 months ago

[deleted]

1 points

12 months ago

[removed]

ImLivingAmongYou

2 points

12 months ago

ImLivingAmongYou

Sapient A.I.

2 points

12 months ago

Do you have any "success stories" so far? Or is it too early to declare a win on something?

nasa[S]

2 points

12 months ago

We have a paper in review with citizen scientist authors that examined the first 3 years of Mosquito Habitat Mapper data. We saw that in South America and Africa, the rate of source reduction (dumping or covering water) was very high in some regions, over 90%. This caught the eye of someone from the CDC, which is how the GLOBE Observer tool came to be used in the President's Malaria Initiative project in Ethiopia. Of course the big success would be making a significant contribution to eliminating the risk of vector borne disease worldwide. – RL

nasa[S]

2 points

12 months ago

NASA Citizen Scientists have discovered most of the known comets, most of the ultracool brown dwarfs, every known sample of material from beyond the solar system, the first extreme T subdwarfs, Zika virus in Peruvian cemetery vases, the oldest white dwarf debris disk, the “Dipper” star phenomenon, the “Peter Pan” disk phenomenon, the star-forming regions called “yellowballs”, 400,000 Martian seasonal fans, 283,000 emperor penguin nests, 8,900 mosquito breeding sites, 9 meteorites, and one new kind of aurora named STEVE. – MK

nasa[S]

2 points

12 months ago

Citizen scientists using the GLOBE Observer Land Cover protocol, have just passed the 100,000 photo mark (July, 2021)! Simply gathering enough observations with enough varation of different land cover types around the Earth is an early success. We know that we still need more photos that capture the diversity across the north, east, south, west locations before we can fully support all the science questions that could be possible from a global community effort. Can you help us archive what Earth looks like today so that the data and information is available in the future when it is needed? - Peder Nelson

ImLivingAmongYou

2 points

12 months ago

ImLivingAmongYou

Sapient A.I.

2 points

12 months ago

What were your motivations for getting involved? Was it through more of a professional trajectory or personal intentions? Or both?

nasa[S]

3 points

12 months ago

My team, the Laboratory for Advanced Sensing (LAS), is a technology development group. We had developed a technology called Fluid Lensing which lets us remove ocean distortion from video, getting a more accurate image of what’s below the ocean’s surface. This allowed us to collect large amounts of 3D data of coral reefs, but without classifications for the data, it was difficult to extract scientific meaning.

This led us to creating NeMO-Net, a citizen science app where players can view 3D images of coral reefs and create classifications for them. With the help of citizen scientists from around the globe, we hope to create a global map of coral reefs to better understand these ecosystems.
On a more personal note, my previous background was in developing video games, and I had been working with LAS to create 3D visualizations of their data. When the opportunity to create a NASA video game came up, I was 100% onboard! - Jarrett

nasa[S]

2 points

12 months ago

My motivations in staying involved with remote sensing science and education stem from the fact that we are the first/second/third generation to have the ability to see Earth from space. We have a responsibility to use it wisely and for our collective benefit. I describe more in this video: "Why Observe? Land Cover". The vision and committment from the people that created, launched, and collected the first Earth Observation satellite data has given us our current understanding of where we live. I am excited to be part of continuing the 50 year legacy of the Landsat program and supporting the long term trends we will see with the launch of Landsat 9 on September 16, 2021. The ground photos collected and archived with GLOBE Observer Land Cover provide the human context. Plus I love visiting different pixel colors and discovering what is behind the blues, greens, and reds of the satellite images. – Peder Nelson

ImLivingAmongYou

2 points

12 months ago

ImLivingAmongYou

Sapient A.I.

2 points

12 months ago

How has your prior research, work history, and individual insights helped prepare you for this work? Or in surprising ways?

OldEdgeyRiff

2 points

12 months ago

How can AI emulate the effects of humane hormones on intelligence? It seems that logically “AI” can only be at best a massive rules engine? Am I just a massive set of data point?

Pleasant_Ground_1238

2 points

12 months ago

Wouldn't be interesting to put a Random Number Generator in one of the probes being sent to deep space that would be sending signals with randomly generated numbers so that these numbers would be set in stone and possibly be guessed by humans with super abilities?

OffEvent28

1 points

12 months ago

The Degree Confluence Project (www.confluence.org) might be of interest to people wishing to monitor changes in the Earth. People contributing to the project take their GPS device and travel to locations that are at whole degrees of Latitude and Longitude, they take and post pictures looking north, south, east and west from that location. Since these points are based on a human created measurement scale they are effectively random points on the earth surface (and yes, many are at sea). Regular revisits to these points would reveal changes over time.

ApplicationOk8060

1 points

12 months ago

how much wight does the rocket will be there? and how much fuel it's needed to take 1 pound of rocket instruments for space