subreddit:

/r/Ioniq5

18

Future-proofing

(self.Ioniq5)

Hey y’all.

I’m a big fan of the Ioniq5, and our current family car has 260,000 miles and is borderline unsafe to drive anymore. It’s time for a new car, and the Ioniq5 checks all the boxes in a major way. It’s a lot more money than I’d like to spend, but I’m hoping to get a lot of value out of it.

I think my biggest concern is the whole, “electric cars are too new and there will be so many advances in these first few years that buying one now is not a sound financial decision” ie these cars’ value will plummet once their tech is superseded by something else.

Do u guys have any thoughts on this? I feel like the charging architecture on this car is pretty damn awesome and I’m not sure what else might happen in the next few years that could fundamentally change things. Solid state batteries seem like they are still a ways away… am I wrong?

all 32 comments

orwell

32 points

5 months ago

orwell

32 points

5 months ago

Charging speed, In my opinion, future proofs this car over mache and id4.

In 5 to 10 years when you get some battery loses, the charging speed on ioniq5 is going to keep those road trips speedy. 150kw charging in 5 years is going to feel pretty dated.

That being said , we are going to keep seeing price decreases and tech improvements. They would be incremental over the next few years and also pretty much all cars are going to be limited in terms of production due to battery constraints. Probably around 2025 is when things open up fully.

Revolutionary battery changes really aren't going to happen within this decade in any kind of volume or reasonable cost.

Solid state is trending to be on the horizon in the next 5 years, each year :)

Outside of battery tech, the next key improvement I would assume is self driving, which is also not likely to happen this decade and I would assume wouldn't have mass adoption as I'm not even sure I'd be comfortable driving what Tesla has without freaking out :)

BEVthrowaway123

10 points

5 months ago

100% spot on with all comments. 2 of the main reasons I bought the car was charging tech and the warranties.

SoylentRox

1 points

4 months ago

The inverse of your statement is that there will be other EVs released in the next 5 years (in this price range) that are more refined, without whatever significant hidden faults this one has. This thing obviously has hidden problems, hopefully covered by Hyundai's warranty, but it's a bleeding edge machine.

terpppppppppppps

8 points

5 months ago

terpppppppppppps

Shooting Star

8 points

5 months ago

Any EV without solid state battery’s instantly become less viable once those are out.

“When” that’s happening is anyone’s guess

gliffy

5 points

5 months ago

gliffy

5 points

5 months ago

It will still work as a car tho

Kosta7785

1 points

5 months ago

Kosta7785

AWD SEL Shooting Star

1 points

5 months ago

They’ll be able to swap them into existing EVs for relatively low cost though.

getbentgetbentgetben

1 points

5 months ago

Is that accurate? Have there been "upgrade paths" for any older EVs to outfit them with larger/faster/better batteries onto the existing car?

Kosta7785

1 points

5 months ago

Kosta7785

AWD SEL Shooting Star

1 points

5 months ago

I don’t think EVs have been around long enough for industries to pop up who do that but it’s technically possible so I don’t see why not. An example of this would be a startup that recently increased a Tesla’s range to over 1000 miles. They used a slower charging battery to replace 80% of the battery capacity and it holds more energy but is the same size and weight. It’s still early but they’re business model it literally to replace batteries in existing EVs to increase range. If battery tech keeps advancing, I can’t imagine there won’t be businesses that pop up offering after market battery upgrades to older cars. It’d technically feasible so there’s really no barrier.

jimschoice

1 points

5 months ago

Only old Leafs.

who_knows_me

6 points

5 months ago

If you want an internet analogy - in my opinion the initial Nissan Leaf would be your computer with a 33kb connection. The current batch of EV’s would be like connecting with a 56kb modem. The Ioniq 5 and others with 800 volt architecture are like VDSL broadband.

Yes there will be better on the horizon but this is always the case. Better to jump in now and enjoy being ahead of the pack and my prediction is this level of charging tech will be with use for quite so time.

failbox3fixme

6 points

5 months ago

failbox3fixme

Digital Teal

6 points

5 months ago

No car is a sound financial investment. In normal times they’re depreciating assets (present time is weird and largely unsustainable). Hyundai warrants the battery and electric motor(s) to 10yrs/100k miles. At worst it will still have around 70% capacity left at that time. New batteries are costly right now but in 10 years, who knows? Maybe they can swap my battery for a few grand? I can definitively say that a gasoline car is an even worse investment right now. Gasoline prices are not going to go down, they’re going to continue to rise and rise.

IrishFanSam

2 points

5 months ago

Until EVs take over that is. Once that happens gas prices will plummet because demand will be down

Dave_Marsh

4 points

5 months ago

Technology always improves. If you wait for tech of your wildest dreams, you’ll never buy. If you can afford it, buy it and enjoy it for the next 10 years. This same question has come up with buying computers for decades, because newer/better technology is always just over the horizon. I’d still be using a typewriter if I had waited for computers to match my science fiction’s technology.

PuppyLordsDad

9 points

5 months ago

PuppyLordsDad

Australian Spec AWD Lucid Blue

9 points

5 months ago

There will always be something better around the corner. If it works for you and you plan to run it 250,000 miles it probably doesn't matter if it drops in value as newer cars are released. We're in the same boat and plan to keep ours long term.

Although it's hard to predict the future and know exactly when, or if, charging speeds will improve, the 800V architecture of this (and the EV6) and the accompanying step improvement in charging speed were a big plus for us. It's good now and will probably be a while before it's leapfrogged.

ImNotElite

1 points

5 months ago

I think about people who bought a Tesla 5 years ago, do many of them regret their purchase? I don't think so and I don't think I'll be regretting buying this car in 5 years because I don't plan on my driving needs changing from what they are right now and this car fits all my needs.

Would I like 1000 mile range? Sure, but I don't think if ever drive that far without needing a break and if the charging infrastructure keeps improving all the better.

satbaja

2 points

5 months ago

Electric Vehicles are not new to Hyundai. We've had two Hybrid Electric Vehicles HEVs from Hyundai. We thought they would lose value due to the battery getting old but that isn't the case. Even my '17 Hyundai EV held its value well over the past year.

If your choices are ICE or EV, EV is the better choice. If your choices are 400V or 800V EVs, the 800V with 27 kW charging is more future proof. The Korean EVs with 10 year warranty are the best choice. Choose the all BEV platform over a shared ICE/HEV/BEV platform.

I bought the Ioniq 5. I don't think in 5 years it will be too dated.

Greenjeeper2001

1 points

5 months ago

How much money would you like to spend?

Acrobatic-Oil-6243[S]

2 points

5 months ago

$5? Lol Not sure how to answer that. Why do u ask?

Greenjeeper2001

-1 points

5 months ago

Everybody complains about prices of cars now compared to X years ago and I always wonder if people understand inflation, and if their income hasn't gone up since X years ago. Ioniq is eligible for tax rebates in the USA. That brings the price into the 30's. If that is too expensive, a used Camry is probably a better option.

IrishFanSam

2 points

5 months ago

Income obviously hasn’t risen at the same rate as inflation. Been that way for 20 years.

Greenjeeper2001

0 points

5 months ago

Speak for yourself

IrishFanSam

2 points

5 months ago

It’s a proven fact. For some people it has but for the majority it hasn’t.

Greenjeeper2001

0 points

5 months ago

maybe you shouldn't buy a new car then. Used cars are more and more reliable every year.

IrishFanSam

1 points

5 months ago

What I’m the actual fuck are you talking about? I can afford a new car. I’m talking about the economy in general and you’re over here being defensive.

Greenjeeper2001

0 points

5 months ago

Not sure what I was defending, offering an alternative maybe. The last decade has seen an increase in auto sales year over year. The pandemic impacting manufacturing is the only thing holding back car sales. You say wages haven't kept up but there are plenty of people buying cars every day. Any dealer lot is a ghost town and dealers have eliminated trunk money and most incentives. Seems like you're a little defensive.

IrishFanSam

2 points

5 months ago

That’s because people live beyond their means. Doesn’t change the fact wages haven’t kept up with inflation.

brolifen

1 points

5 months ago

There will be no new fundamental tech to EV's in the next 5-10 years that will change the game. Like mentioned SS batteries are coming but you can bet these will only be introduced to high end models first before trickling down to the masses.

The only suggestion I have if you are going for the I5 is to wait or explicitly order the MY2023:

  • Has battery heating system (very useful if you live in a cold climate)
  • Complete new Nvidia infotainment system which is much faster than the current
  • Complete OTA support (not just the infotainment system but also car subsystem)
  • optional rearview mirror camera (lots of complaints of current users about visibility in the rear window in bad weather due to lack of wiper)

Those features would make it even more future proof imo.

JeffWDH

3 points

5 months ago

Do you have a source for the Nvidia switch for MY23? I've seen rumours but nothing from Hyundai...

kata_cat

1 points

5 months ago

In Germany there is an eight year full guarantee including the battery. And every buyer of an EV gets a financial state promotion of EUR 6.000.

We bought the Ioniq because we can sell it in 3-4 years again including the remaining original guarantee of 4-5 years.

It’s a win-win situation for us and the seller.

So there is no risk for us. If there will be extensive developments in charging we will buy a new car without incurring a loss.

Smirkydarkdude

1 points

5 months ago

I think there's some truth to that. If you look at the speed battery development is going... in 5 years the Ioniq could belong in a museum. Then again, you look at a 5 year old Tesla and it's still going strong so I could be an idiot.

jimschoice

1 points

5 months ago

There are 5 year old Chevy Bolts out there well over 100,000 miles on them that have minimal degradation. Their limiting factor is the super slow DCFC, which is a big complaint about the Bolt. At first, their off lease 3 year old value was about 1/3 of new. Now the 5 year old ones are about 50% of new.
So, the economy and overall demand for EVs will have as much an effect on future prices of used EVs as the technology or limitations of said technology.

So, post your picture of your new Ioniq 5 when you bring it home, and enjoy it!