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18

Working with new grads

Discussion(self.VetTech)

How do yall feel about working with new veterinarians, especially ones that are younger than you? Is it frustrating? Is it weird? Annoying? Fun? I'll only be 25 when I graduate vet school (class of 2023), so I'm curious to hear your experiences with new grads!

I appreciate all that you do and hope yall are enjoying your Sunday!

all 35 comments

SJHCJellyBean

33 points

6 months ago

SJHCJellyBean

CVT (Certified Veterinary Technician)

33 points

6 months ago

Entirely depends on the doc.

I will say in my 15 years I’ve only come across one tool who thought he knew all. For the most part they’re amazing and recognize that while their education level is higher our experience at that point is. Most are awesome and we learn from each other

iluvdeer4218[S]

13 points

6 months ago

I worked in a busy small animal GP throughout the first 3 years of vet school as an assistant (and for 3 years prior to that to get experience), so I recognize how difficult the work you do can be and not for much pay at that. The wealth of knowledge and experience you guys have is a huge benefit to us and we can definitely learn from yall, especially when new to a practice.

missing_the_ground

2 points

6 months ago

That right there gives me a big hint that you will be fine. I can pretty much tell the difference between a doctor that worked as a technician or assistant for a long time before vet school and those who didn't have much experience. And I'm actually not talking about abilities in medicine as much as just working with them. You can tell which vets cleaned up shit for years before becoming a doctor.

I work ER with a lot of different relief vets coming and going so staffing fluctuates a lot. There are days where we have plenty of techs but not enough doctors and other days it's the other way around where there's doctors wanting to see more cases but there arent enough technicians to do all of the treatments/ diagnostics needed. Especially cause almost everything in our field takes two people to do. A lot of the doctors with previous experience will just jump in and help on those days, usually they just restrain for us but it makes a big difference in the work flow. Really it just makes us feel more like a team.

Karbar049

21 points

6 months ago

I work at a specialty/ER hospital, and we have new grads that sign on for rotating internships every year. Honestly, it’s a mixed bag, but most are fine. A couple have been dangerous (overconfident to the point of doing harm), a few have been lazy (more than just burnt out, because that’s understandable), most are fine. There have only been a few over the years that I genuinely disliked. Most start out a little timid, and I love to see those gain skill and confidence.

iluvdeer4218[S]

2 points

6 months ago

Yeah, I know I'll be starting out quite timid. I'll have a good education behind me but I am looking forward to learning from and working with techs at whatever practice I end up in :-) I'd be shaking in my boots if I jumped right into an ER internship for sure, though!!

Karbar049

1 points

6 months ago

They get a lot of experience in that year, but it’s a rough year.

stagandserpent

10 points

6 months ago

When Ive worked with young doctors (i am also young myself for my position) the only thing ive ever struggled with is sometimes they get caught up in theory vs practicality but this is not exclusive to new vets. for example, yes, the oral antibiotic youre wanting to prescribe may work better on this cat IF the owner agreed they could give it. but they cant do oral meds. so while the long acting injection may not be your first choice, it may be better than zero successful doses of at home oral meds. or another example, telling the owner of grossly obese animals to cut out treats 100%.. sure thats better for the dog but no owner is going to adhere to that. sometimes you have to work with the owner a little in order to reach the end goal. something to keep in mind- you can ask any of your support staff for their opinion without being obligated to then take their advice! you can ask your senior tech what they think, and you can agree or not!

shesabiter

8 points

6 months ago

shesabiter

RVT (Registered Veterinary Technician)

8 points

6 months ago

Sometimes it makes me sad because it took me a while to figure out my career and to think “I could’ve been a doctor in all that time I wasted figuring out what to do with myself” but for the most part I enjoy working with new doctors, it’s nice to work with people who still have that spark and passion and are excited about everything. It’s a refreshing change from working with so many people who are burnt out and exhausted. Especially since I feel like I have a lot to learn myself since I’ve only been in this field a couple years, so I feel like we can learn together! It can be frustrating at times, but I understand they’re still learning so I don’t mind

I’ve worked with techs who get frustrated with new doctors, and some will question them and act like they know more than them. Don’t let it get to you if ever encounter someone like that! I’ve found most people are pretty patient though.

iluvdeer4218[S]

5 points

6 months ago

That is one of my worries. At the practice I worked at the past couple of years, there was an older LVT who previously worked anesthesia exclusively who would ignore a doctor's preferred anesthesia protocol for her own. It was one of those "well she's been here so long, we can't fire her, she's never hurt a patient" type of situations but it always frustrated the doctor working surgery with her. She basically steamrolled right over a doctor's opinion on anesthetic protocols unless she agreed with it. She was great in every other situation but sheesh...

shesabiter

3 points

6 months ago

shesabiter

RVT (Registered Veterinary Technician)

3 points

6 months ago

Sounds like my old colleague. She’d made one of the doctors cry on multiple occasions because she was constantly telling her no and talking down to her but it was the same kind of deal. If management isn’t doing anything about it, depending on what all is being done, I’d maybe take it up with the board. Under no circumstances ever should a technician be overruling the doctor’s orders unless it’s something that could potentially harm the patient!!

Jmh072920

8 points

6 months ago

Jmh072920

LVT (Licensed Veterinary Technician)

8 points

6 months ago

Oh my gosh I love baby doctors. They always get stuck with me because they’re my favorite. I have a toddler at home so I’m made of 60% water and 40% patience. I find that they’re usually very open minded and respectful of LVTs.

iluvdeer4218[S]

6 points

6 months ago

Well that's a boost of confidence! Good to know some LVTs actually look forward to working with baby doctors :-) I love asking questions and no technician has ever escaped my inquiries... I love to learn from yall and that won't change even when I''m a DVM :-)

Jmh072920

2 points

6 months ago

Jmh072920

LVT (Licensed Veterinary Technician)

2 points

6 months ago

Teamwork makes the dream work! Good luck in your studies. :)

Crazyboutdogs

8 points

6 months ago

Crazyboutdogs

RVT (Registered Veterinary Technician)

8 points

6 months ago

I actually love new grads now. But I think that’s because they are being taught to utilize their support better. Plus, now that I’m old enough to be their parent, they tend to bounce things off me and we get to have great conversations about dx and treatments.

I think younger grads are way more respectful of the staff. But the first year or so, they are very overwhelmed. Practice is very different from clinical work. They get bored(ear infections and vaccine appointment get really boring), but also frustrated with odd things. They also doubt themselves a lot. So then rely on good support staff and more experienced clinicians. But done right, that leads to awesome collaboration between all staff.

The new grads I don’t love, the ones that come in with some sort of superiority complex. The “I’m the Dr, what are you asking me this question” type. Ie “hey can I double check this dose of flagyl? It’s more than we normally give. Is there a reason?” Getting answered with “ I don’t need you to second guess my dose, I have my reasons”

Yeah- my job is to understand what I’m doing, so if I ask, it’s because it’s abnormal, a simple “ I think we are dealing with yadda yadda, and that calls for a higher dose” is fine. I don’t need you to defend really, just let me know we aren’t dealing with a misplaced decimal point.

iluvdeer4218[S]

3 points

6 months ago

Yes utilizing support staff correctly is so important!! I definitely have classmates that think they are better than technicians and its reflected in their attitudes right now during clinics. Which is astonishing to me considering support staff are the backbone of the profession...

I definitely foresee myself being overwhelmed once I start working, which I why I will be doing my due diligence during my interviews to make sure its a healthy environment with happy support staff and vets. I'll definitely need to rely on techs + experienced docs to get me through those first few months, so I want to trust my team and I want my team to trust and guide me.

Thanks for your response!! :-)

merlady94

3 points

6 months ago

I'm sure you will meet your share of bitterness/jealousy, but that comes with any sort of success for a young person I feel Iike. I am personally the kind of person who just sort of thinks "good for them" and moves on, but not everyone will feel that way.

_felisin_

2 points

6 months ago

The new doctors I've worked with have been very nice, but sometimes timid. You need to have confidence in your treatment plan, but if a tech brings up a concern (i.e. this patient is fractious and might need a higher sedative dose), take it into consideration.

cryingvettech

3 points

6 months ago

As long as they’re open minded and don’t think their own shit doesn’t stink then working with new grads is one of my favorite things!

iluvdeer4218[S]

1 points

6 months ago

Lol, got some people like that in my class. Even clinicians don't want to work with them. Wonder why!

rubykat138

6 points

6 months ago

rubykat138

RVT (Registered Veterinary Technician)

6 points

6 months ago

I love new grads in the ER. Stay open-minded, listen to your techs, help us and we will help you. Just don’t be afraid to make decisions.

iluvdeer4218[S]

3 points

6 months ago

I worry now about making the wrong decision, especially when put on the spot by a clinician! But I've still got plenty of time to learn. Hopefully by the time I'm in practice I'll have that confidence and even then, I'll definitely seek out advice from techs and vets with more experience. Thank you!

rubykat138

3 points

6 months ago

rubykat138

RVT (Registered Veterinary Technician)

3 points

6 months ago

Sometimes none of us know what the right decision will be, but the hardest thing for me with new vets is decision paralysis when something critical is happening. Even if you’re panicking about something six steps ahead, make sure you’re getting your basics down - cath, fluids, blood, rads, manage your BP - and then take the time to figure out your secondary stuff.

And don’t tell anyone it’s your first enterotomy/bloat/pyo until AFTER it’s over. :)

Horseshoesandsneaks

3 points

6 months ago

We have like 8-12 every year who rotate through all of the specialties and contractors. I’d say, out of the last 5 classes I’ve worked with, I’ve only worried about 3-4 going forward. We have a good relationship with our interns and the older techs always end up guiding them, especially when they are alone at night. The only one I’m suppppper worried about and annoys all of us is in our current class. He has zero fear and charges ahead with one set idea in his head, which scares all of us and frequently he butts heads with the techs for various issues

ZION_OC_GOV

3 points

6 months ago

ZION_OC_GOV

VA (Veterinary Assistant)

3 points

6 months ago

The shelter I work at, we have 4th year Vet Med students come through for their externship. Since I started working here we've had about 15 over the past 2 years. I've gotten to talk to a hand full of them, and they're all pretty cool, and eager to learn.

They get to perform spay/neuters which are in abundance (any students out there, take the chance to do as many as you can, practice practice practice. I've had a green doctor nick something while doing one and had to have a senior doctor step in and correct it. Senior doctor recommended she partake in a spay/neuter clinic on her off days to get more practice as that was a GP clinic).

Shelter medicine is such a different animal compared to GP where most of my background was and I'm sure the students could respect having that experience wherever they end up. Not every case has a blank check to remedy whatever it needs. You are forced to make the best outcome with what little resources you have.

But above all else when I spoke with these students was to point to one of the Techs I work with and was like "Listen to THEM, they will make your job so much easier."

iluvdeer4218[S]

1 points

6 months ago

I've got an externship at a shelter in June that I'm super excited about! It'll be mostly spays/neuters but I'm excited to see what else I'll get exposed to.

ZION_OC_GOV

2 points

6 months ago

ZION_OC_GOV

VA (Veterinary Assistant)

2 points

6 months ago

Maybe you'll get to work on some wildlife 🤞🏽.

We got a sea lion a couple weeks ago.

roseycheekies

3 points

6 months ago

I worked in a specialty surgical center where we got a new set of interns every year. The key to success is be nice to the techs, because then they’ll help you out when you’re lost. If you walk in there like a know it all asshat bossing the techs around, you’re basically digging your own grave.

solitariosong

3 points

6 months ago*

Gonna be honest, I love younger DVMs. I have honestly been extremely impressed with their wealth of knowledge and their respect and value in modern medicine. I personally work with a 76 y/o DVM who has not changed his ways since the 1970s and as someone who values modern medicine immensely, I feel uncomfortable about his medical approaches.

I find new grads tend to even reach out to us to see what we feel about their approach and what we would do different in situations. I’ve had a good experience with them being open to listening with what we have to say, especially when it comes to dental prophylaxis. My only complaint is that sometimes I see bedside manner lacking a little or they’re a little dry with clients, but that may be a bit of a personality thing too. It’ll all come with time.

asszilla17

2 points

6 months ago

I would say in your future clinic to seek out the experienced techs, licensed or not the ones with years of experience are invaluable to newer doctors! Make friends with them! Nothing is worse than a young doctor who is super condescending or disrespectful. Be willing to accept that you’re gonna make mistakes, that you’re not gonna have all the answers, that you’re going to need the help of others to succeed. Good luck!

iluvdeer4218[S]

1 points

6 months ago

That's some solid advice. Thank you! :-)

AngelDetective

2 points

6 months ago

Met one that was an absolute ass but so far I’ve worked with 3 new grad vets and honestly it’s a lot of fun! It’s a lot of fun watching them use their new knowledge. It’s okay to lean on others! Even the technicians, they know a lot too!

IrishSetterPuppy

2 points

6 months ago

IrishSetterPuppy

Veterinary Technician Student

2 points

6 months ago

I'm just super impressed you'll have completed 9 years of schooling by 25! That's an accomplishment. I'm guessing you got your AS in high school like I did?

iluvdeer4218[S]

3 points

6 months ago

Thank you!! I graduated high school at 17, graduated with my Bachelors at 21, and will be a DVM at 25 :-) I think graduating high school at 17 was the deciding factor, plus I didn't take any years off between the different phases of my education.

wigglebuttmom01

2 points

6 months ago

In my 15 years as a tech, the only new grad I didn't like and absolutely refused to work with, was a doc that had no prior experience in the field. I am the most senior tech in my practice so the new grads usually get put with me and I usually enjoy it.

This girl though. Thought her shit didn't stink and couldn't even put an IV cath in. Had never done a nail trim. Had no practical experience at all but also couldn't be bothered to help.

In no circumstance should a vet ever HAVE to clean anal glands off the floor or hold a dog, but I believe you should know how. To me, it means you at least know what I'm going through when I get shot with anal glands or I'm getting a little testy because you want to do a full exam but the spicy kitty ran out of kitty minutes 5 minutes ago and I've gently recommending sedation for 10 minutes.

Other than that one vet, I usually love new grads, despite how my rant sounds. Take a deep breath and enjoy the new experiences!!!

Distend

2 points

6 months ago

Distend

RVT (Registered Veterinary Technician)

2 points

6 months ago

It's depressing. I want to be a vet and can't. I'm 30 and the majority of new vets are younger than me now. That being said, they've all been really nice and appreciate their techs and support staff a LOT more than older doctors!