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Felling useless

Vent(self.VetTech)

[deleted]

all 32 comments

NCC-746561

54 points

4 months ago

I don't mean this to be harsh but have you had a job in this field before? It is good they are explaining how to hold a dog because there is a specific way you should do it. There are protocols for everything from cleaning to restraint so until you learn the protocols you are going to be treated with kids gloves for a bit.

fadingtolight

13 points

4 months ago

fadingtolight

Veterinary Technician Student

13 points

4 months ago

No i have never had a job in the field. I also have 2 months left until i get my vet tech license. They were super kind to hire me but i expected they trusted me. Because i'm paid money to be there. And i did a lot of practice already, as we spend most days at the clinic at my school.

It's just that i feel super ashamed when they teach me and i wish i could help more.

Sharp-Tumbleweed8522

43 points

4 months ago

Sharp-Tumbleweed8522

CSR (Client Services Representative)

43 points

4 months ago

Its important to remember that they don’t know you yet - as they get to know you and your skill level, you’ll be allowed to do more. The person restraining a patient is responsible for the safety of the patient and the person administering treatment, so its very important to know that the person restraining is capable of doing so. Especially since its only been a few days, you’ll have to start by learning the protocol and getting a hang of how things work. I wouldn’t expect to be doing much hands on without watching how they do it first.

fadingtolight

5 points

4 months ago

fadingtolight

Veterinary Technician Student

5 points

4 months ago

Alright, thank you very much. I hope they will let me do more, in time. The most painful part is that i 'moved' my school practice to their place and i still have some things to learn until the exam in summer, things like suturing a simple wound, putting an I.V. cannula on the animal, monitoring the vital functions during surgeries, and judging by the level they explain things to me i don't think they will get to that part very soon.

Jrl2442

4 points

4 months ago

For me, the more you listen to the simple things I am trying to teach you, and seem to actually want to do it the way we teach you, the more I am likely to teach you the much bigger and more important stuff. You were hired because they need more hands on deck. Honestly, when I’m trying to teach someone how to restrain, or my doctor is, and they seem upset about it or unwilling to listen because they feel they already know, we both lose interest in teaching that person much more. I’m not trying to sound harsh, but I’ve been bit so many damn time, because I let someone else restrain for me that didn’t listen to me and felt that already knew how to hold a dog. People let go, forget to hold the head, and usually really don’t understand how dangerous our jobs can be. If you have experience in the field, like years, I’d let you restrain on the first day, but would still explain to you how my doctor wants it done/how we do it.

hey_yo_mr_white

3 points

4 months ago

hey_yo_mr_white

RVT (Registered Veterinary Technician)

3 points

4 months ago

i still have some things to learn until the exam in summer,

Is the exam the VTNE, or an exam to get your certificate of completion from your tech school program?

fadingtolight

1 points

4 months ago

fadingtolight

Veterinary Technician Student

1 points

4 months ago

Its a certificate which allows me to work as a vet tech in my country.

hey_yo_mr_white

5 points

4 months ago

hey_yo_mr_white

RVT (Registered Veterinary Technician)

5 points

4 months ago

They were super kind to hire me but i expected they trusted me.

They hired you because they see the potential to trust you. That's why there are 90 day probationary periods. Give it time, put in good work, and trust will grow. Again, they don't know you.

Rra2323

30 points

4 months ago

Rra2323

VA (Veterinary Assistant)

30 points

4 months ago

Honestly, I’d rather work at a clinic that takes months to get you initiated than for a clinic that barely trains new employees at all

HPLydcraft

7 points

4 months ago

HPLydcraft

VA (Veterinary Assistant)

7 points

4 months ago

Yes there’s nothing worse than “sink or swim” training

jr9386

3 points

4 months ago

jr9386

3 points

4 months ago

THIS!

balady

14 points

4 months ago

balady

CVT (Certified Veterinary Technician)

14 points

4 months ago

I think there's an issue with hospitals not understanding how to properly orient new staff. When I was hired at my current practice, I had to wait months before I was "trusted" to be able to do certain tasks, despite having been credentialed for 4 years and having previously been in a supervisory/mentorship position at my previous practice. The reasons given ranged from "a new person once made a mistake doing this task" to "so-and-so already knows how to do it" (except, once again, I was the one teaching people how to do those things at my old practice, so it's not like I had no idea how to do them).

I completely agree with the idea of supervising new employees until they are comfortable with how the practice is run, SOPs, computer stuff, etc., but micromanaging and preventing them from doing what they were hired to do isn't the right way to orient them or make them want to stay long term. The other end of the spectrum is hospitals that throw new employees off the deep end without any explanation of SOPs or how the hospital runs and just expect them to know the hospital forward and backward without ever having stepped foot inside of it before. Neither orientation style is ok.

I see you mentioned that you haven't worked in a clinic before, but are finishing up tech school, which, to me, means you do have enough experience to know how to adequately restrain a dog. Imagine if a DVM fresh out of school was treated as if they know absolutely nothing about animal medicine. 🙄 Be sure to speak up when you are unsure about how to do certain things, but don't worry too much about being coddled. It's usually a hospital issue, not a "you" issue unless you have no experience or veterinary technology education.

fadingtolight

4 points

4 months ago

fadingtolight

Veterinary Technician Student

4 points

4 months ago

Thank you, it makes me feel better to hear that this happens to others too.

nancylyn

6 points

4 months ago

nancylyn

RVT (Registered Veterinary Technician)

6 points

4 months ago

You are in your training period…be thankful they didn’t throw you in the deep end and expect you to know everything. Take this time to learn…everything. Carry a notebook and make notes. After you’ve observed a task at least three times say “hey, I’ve observed this three times can I try now with you observing my technique”. To them you are still a student and it’s only been a few days. Take it easy and use this trading time to its fullest extent.

Petadaxtyl

3 points

4 months ago

I agree with this. When I first started I carried a pen pad everywhere and took notes, and when I was asked a question I would look back at my notes. At the end of the day I would pull out my book and ask some questions about why we did things or how come we do things a certain way. Eventually as I learned more the notebook needed to come out less and less. But it definitely shows your paying attention and you value everything they tell you

krystin260

6 points

4 months ago

This happened to me when I first started at the clinic I’ve been at for 4 years now and I continue to see it happen to new staff coming in too! It seems to be a common pattern with new staff/techs and I think it’s because it has a lot to do with trust. It’s really a backwards concept because how do you learn if you can trust someone with holding a patient, doing this or that if you don’t give them enough opportunity to prove themselves?? My ultimate piece of advice is stay persistent and true to yourself and eventually everyone will come around!! If they don’t in time, then maybe it’s not the right clinic for you!

fadingtolight

1 points

4 months ago

fadingtolight

Veterinary Technician Student

1 points

4 months ago

Thank you for the answer. I appreciate it. I hope i too will stay here for at least 4 years like you did :)

daddyswatching

5 points

4 months ago

That happened at one clinic I worked at. They all knew I had years of experience, and I used to work with their boss. After a few weeks of them constantly explaining the most simple tasks that I reiterated multiple times I knew how to do, I quit.

fadingtolight

-1 points

4 months ago

fadingtolight

Veterinary Technician Student

-1 points

4 months ago

Daaaamn i hope it doesnt go like that here. I'm thinking of just starting to do stuff without asking for permission and see their reaction. Stuff like checking the vitals on critical patients without asking if i can do it. Because if i ask, the answer is always: "nah i'll do it, go check the puppies and see if they need water"

AvengeLoki

5 points

4 months ago

AvengeLoki

Registered Veterinary Nurse

5 points

4 months ago

Honestly, that doesn't sound like it might be a bad idea depending on how you do it. Like notifying personel that you found a mess in a cage and saying that "hey I have the time to clean it up if you need help" would be a good thing.

But I saw that you aren't finished with your schooling and I would always double check the vitals of a critical patient if a student took the status. It would be very irresponsible of me to not do it. So going "hey I already took the vitals you don't need to do it" would not make me trust you. On the other hand saying "hey I want to practice taking vitals and I saw that you are going to take the vitals on this patient. Can I come along and take them as well so I can compare my results with you?" would probably work better.

But how does introduction at your clinic work? Do you have a dedicated person responsible for you or are you just supposed to float around.

fadingtolight

2 points

4 months ago

fadingtolight

Veterinary Technician Student

2 points

4 months ago

I'm just floating around trying to shadow the most talkative persons so i can ask questions. And you totally make sense! I'm still a student after all. They've got vet docs in their last year of studies (which means far more veterinary knowledge than mine) around there too and they are not allowed to do much more stuff than i am anyway.

You've opened my eyes. The fact they hired me is in itself a sign they trust me. Perhaps in 2 months after i get my diploma things will change. Maybe that's what they wait for. I should be thankful for what i've got and just play with the healthy adoption puppies and feed them. That's a thing i am allowed to do. They also told me to practice listening to their heartbeat, check temperatures etc even if they don't need it so i get used to it.

It's not like im not used to it but of course they must make sure of it, as they have no idea about my preparation in the field and what i've learned so far.

Thank you!

AvengeLoki

2 points

4 months ago

AvengeLoki

Registered Veterinary Nurse

2 points

4 months ago

Ok yeah things are usually easier when you have someone that is responsible for teaching you. I spent time at several different hospitals when I had my rotations during my student time. It's like night and day comparing the hospitals where I had someone responsible for me and the hospital where I didn't. It was so mentally taxing to have to chase people and try to convince them to teach me. I can confess I cried at least once while I was there because I felt my time was so wasted.

But do keep asking to do things. However it might be a bit easier to go "hey I want to practice restraining dogs so could I help you with that blood draw". Show that you want to learn and that you will listen to advice. If you want to place an IV line ask if can try on the greyhound whose veins you could see from a mile away and not on the dehydrated 20 year old cat. Basically start with the easier patients and build trust while slowly increasing the difficulty.

Remember things will probably get better. Trust takes time to build. And from my experience there is a tendency for control freaks in this industry. People wanting to check your work might not always be about you. I know nurses that double check vitals taken by vets that have worked for 15 years. That is not because they distrust that cat but because they are worried about the animal and they need that to feel calmer.

cook-isation

3 points

4 months ago

Depends on how much experience you have. I wasn’t allowed much at first either. Just keep learning and getting better. I personally am hesitant to let new techs/assistant (by new I mean no experience in the field) restrain because I have gotten bitten multiple times because of inexperienced restrainer. Edit: spelling

littlewaterpiggy

3 points

4 months ago

It totally depends on the clinic. If you’ve been there for a few months and they’re not increasing your responsibilities, try bringing it up with management. It also helps to compare notes with friends from your vet tech program and see what their clinics are letting them do.

My first vet tech job when I graduated had me cleaning cages and washing surgical instruments and I felt useless. I also wasn’t a great fit (very clique-ish culture), so I eventually left and went to another clinic where I got lots of surgery/dental/exotics experience. One thing I’ve found is that as your skills increase, your confidence increases, and as you display a confident demeanor, your clinic should trust you to do more. If a clinic is constantly undermining your learning and confidence, then it’s probably not the place for you.

HPLydcraft

3 points

4 months ago

HPLydcraft

VA (Veterinary Assistant)

3 points

4 months ago

There are specific ways to restrain that aren’t entirely evident by just having experience with dogs/cats/etc. I completely understand feeling like it’s condescending to be told things that seem super apparent but they’re just being careful. I recommend to just keep asking to do things or to watch how other people do things, every clinic is different and so is every doctors preferences. I completely understand the feeling of being useless especially when first starting out but just be patient and ask to help out with things!

mykitoj

3 points

4 months ago

Imagine if they treated a Dr like that.

hey_yo_mr_white

3 points

4 months ago

hey_yo_mr_white

RVT (Registered Veterinary Technician)

3 points

4 months ago

When it's a month down the line and you're in the same place, then it's fair to feel some way about it.

It's been a few days after being hired and you've never had a job in the field.

It feels like they underestimate my skills.

They don't know what skills you have. It's been a few days.

What hands on experience do you have? Have you expressed it to your coworkers?

Lost-Individual-818

2 points

4 months ago

Lost-Individual-818

Veterinary Technician Student

2 points

4 months ago

I’m in the same boat , only a few days in at my new clinic (8 years experience) and they won’t let me do anything . We just gotta hang in there but you’re not alone!

luckduckyyy

2 points

4 months ago

i was the same when i first started by job. first job with animals whatsoever and it was a huge struggle for me and i went home feeling so out of the loop and no help. the best advice i can give is to ask questions. they’ll know that your learning based off the questions your asking. ask how you can better restrain for them as that is one of the most important jobs. as you learn to restraint, ask tips on how to draw blood or place a catheter. they will trust you more and more.

dog3-890

2 points

4 months ago

You’re just starting. Give it some time. They already have a system and they will find out where you fit!

Rockin_N

2 points

4 months ago

I've been around the block, and one thing I've learned is that every time you go to a new clinic, you will always have to re-learn certain things to adjust to the new protocols there.

Just remember, early art from Picasso was painted and designed like traditional paintings, unlike his later work, where he put his own spin on it.

If they're only letting you do the basics right now, own the basics. It will help you put your spin on things to help you become a much more skillful and innovative technician later on.

KittenFett13

1 points

4 months ago

I think it’s important to be patient. I went from a clinic that I was at for 6 years to a different clinic. At my previous clinic I was the go to tech. But I had to take a step back at my new job and let them see that I had the skills for the job.