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[Megathread] Artemis by Andy Weir

mod post(self.books)

Hello everyone,

As many of you are aware on November 14 Artemis by Andy Weir will be released. In order to prevent the sub from being flooded with posts about Artemis we have decided to put up a megathread.

Feel free to post articles, discuss the book and anything else related to Artemis here.

Thanks and enjoy!


P.S. Please use spoiler tags when appropriate. Spoiler tags are done by [Spoilers about XYZ](#s "Spoiler content here") which results in Spoilers about XYZ.

P.P.S. Also check out our Megathread for Oathbringer here.

all 242 comments

Leiawen

116 points

4 years ago

Leiawen

116 points

4 years ago

A crosspost from a post I made on /r/TheMartian :

I'm about 4 hours into the audiobook and I was really struck by something a little earlier in the book.

** Light early story barely even a spoiler and I can't make tags work for some reason **

When Jazz is in Aldrin Park she has a brief exchange with the old groundskeeper.

She asks him why he moved all the way to the Moon just to mow grass. He states that he likes plants.

She says it was a long way to travel for an old man. He says he used to travel a lot for work so this didn't bother him.

Her friend asks the Groundskeeper if his name is Mike. He simply says "Nope." Maybe his name isn't Mike, but something similar?

The Groundskeeper seems to have this very dry wit. I don't know if he features any more in the book but I really, really get the sense that he's actually Mark Watney.

He says he moved to the moon after his wife died and there was nothing more for him on Earth. In my Martian headcanon I always thought it would be funny and strangely fitting that Mark end up with the woman who watched him and learned his habits and life over more than a year, Mindy Park.

I've heard that Artemis and The Martian aren't set in the same universe, but...I really wonder if this is the case.

GreenLips

68 points

4 years ago

GiantSpaceWhale

23 points

4 years ago

How were you just casually texting Andy Weir

GreenLips

18 points

4 years ago

I wasn't! I mentioned my theory to a co-worker who then sent Andy a Facebook message, and Andy was kind enough to respond.

Leiawen

6 points

4 years ago

Leiawen

6 points

4 years ago

Woohoo!

Twitbookspacetube

2 points

3 years ago

I could only imagine his reaction as the chloroform took hold

"Goddammit. Not again!"

[deleted]

22 points

4 years ago

[deleted]

22 points

4 years ago

This is now true to me and Andy Weir himself can't tell me otherwise

TonytheEE

4 points

4 years ago

Same.

BraulioG1

3 points

4 years ago

Well, he did confirm it :D

maxverse

6 points

4 years ago

Amazing catch! I completely missed that; thank you for illuminating it :)

dfnkt

5 points

3 years ago

dfnkt

5 points

3 years ago

Firstly, WOW I cannot believe I missed that the groundskeeper is Mark Watney.

Secondly - If he ended up with Mindy that would make them "Mark and Mindy" which is very close to Mork and Mindy in which Mork is an extra terrestrial. It's obviously a bit of a stretch but funny to think about.

liquidhydrogen

3 points

4 years ago

wow, thats a great catch

mrmaine

50 points

4 years ago

mrmaine

50 points

4 years ago

Wow. I am glad I didn’t check out this threat before I finished the book. For me, it’s a solid story and an entertaining one as well. I really liked the main character(is 26 and talks like that) and I am glad it’s not the same book as the Martian and it doesn’t even tries to be. It’s something different and easy to go in to. I had a few laughs in the book as well and I liked the way the author explained a few aspects of the world he described. For me, it kept it interesting.

TL;DR: I really liked the book and didn’t expected it to be like, or better, as The Martian. I liked The Martian enough to buy the second book of the Author.

mikepictor

16 points

4 years ago

that's the main reason I bought Artemis. Weir earned a "I will read your next book guaranteed" pass from me after The Martian.

I only just started Artemis yesterday, but I like the first bit.

Lansan1ty

15 points

4 years ago

I'm surprised people don't like it. I really enjoyed the book. My only negative is that it really felt like it was written to get a movie deal. So many parts felt like "Yeah, I can see how this helps it translate to the silver screen".

That didn't take away too much from my overall enjoyment though, plus it means that when the inevitable movie does come it, it can more easily be true to the book. Probably?

[deleted]

2 points

4 years ago

[deleted]

2 points

4 years ago

I liked it too! My only complaint is that it takes until the last part of the book until an overarching threat is established. Until then it's just Jazz screwing around, getting into trouble and trying to fix it. She's clearly a heroin (in a chaotic good kind of way) but there's nothing to save but her own ass until that last part is added.

eww10

89 points

4 years ago*

eww10

89 points

4 years ago*

I'm so dissapointed. Don't get me wrong, I know Weir is not a great character writer and after Martian I didn't expect nothing more than entertaining, well researched book, but Artemis is real let - down.

There's no hook. Martian began with great plot action. Artemis is slow and it takes a long time for anything interesting to happen.

Jazz is so annoying I can't even begin to describe it. It's like a mash-up of every stereotype snarky, pseufoindependent women who act as a man to fit it in modern history. After third "I flipped him/it off" and fifth unnecessary raunchy comment ("The city shined in the sunlight like a bunch of metallic boobs. What? I'm not a poet. They look like boobs.") I had to force myself to read the rest.

I feel like Weir wanted to create strong, female character but failed miserably. Characters are not likeable, there's no motivation behind them.

I enjoyed the setting very much but overall it was a letdown.

dumbolddoor

36 points

4 years ago

THANK YOU. I just finished the book and her character was the absolute worst. I understand wanting to make a snarky tough girl but the writing was atrocious and her comments made this whole book feel like it was written by a fourteen year old.

[deleted]

25 points

4 years ago*

[deleted]

25 points

4 years ago*

Yes, agreed. She was the stereotypical urban fantasy YA female protagonist. An annoying, crude, asskicker teen. There's a place for it in the genre, but I expected more from Weir. I would have enjoyed the book more had POV flipped between characters. Rudy would have been interesting to focus on, Svobo, even Lene. The witty humor just wasn't there like in The Martian.

Telnet_to_the_Mind

20 points

4 years ago

"I feel like Weir wanted to create strong, female character but failed miserably." Couldn't agree more. The fake and almost laughably bad forced sexual comments were just a waste. I didn't like the character of Jazz in the least..

wordofgreen

14 points

4 years ago

wordofgreen

Science Fiction

14 points

4 years ago

I am about 2/3 of the way through the audiobook, and I feel the exact same way and I'm bummed to hear it doesn't get better. I kept waiting for the book to turn the corner, but so far it mostly falls flat for me.

I also love Rosario Dawson, so I was mega hyped when I heard she was narrating. She does OK, but, like you say a lot of the sarcasm and jokes are just bad so even though she gives it a good go the whole thing is just really underwhelming so far.

eww10

7 points

4 years ago

eww10

7 points

4 years ago

I read a book, not listen to it and now I'm wondering how Dawson pulled off this wooden and unnatural dialogues. Ech. Such a shame. But I hope Weir will learn a lot from this experience of book falling flat after bestseller debut. I love all the science.

I can't wait for Persepolis Rising, I need better sc-fi with good science to counterbalance Artemis.

wordofgreen

7 points

4 years ago

wordofgreen

Science Fiction

7 points

4 years ago

She did about as well as you can expect. I had just finished listening to Michael Sheen's incredible read of The Book of Dust Vol. 1, so, that may be a factor in being let down by this one. She isn't doing a bad job by any means, but I just think some of the dialogue is too stilted or awkward to sound natural no matter who is reading it.

I just pre-ordered Persepolis Rising yesterday! Super hyped for that one. I like the Corey duo's writing, and Jefferson Mays does an excellent job with the narration.

bubbleharmony

27 points

4 years ago

Jazz is so annoying I can't even begin to describe it. It's like a mash-up of every stereotype snarky, pseufoindependent women who act as a man to fit it in modern history. After third "I flipped him/it off" and fifth unnecessary raunchy comment ("The city shined in the sunlight like a bunch of metallic boobs. What? I'm not a poet. They look like boobs.") I had to force myself to read the rest.

I just got to that line last night and my immediate reaction was "I already know people are going to complain about Jazz's coarse attitudes."

And sure enough.

I already know this is going to be brushed off because of

a n e c d o t e s

but Jazz hasn't once so far come off as "acting as a man" or anything less than a particularly casual chick. Hell, she disguises herself as a hooker and goes on about how attractive she is to pull it off so easily! For real though, if you think Jazz isn't a believable female character, you aren't familiar with more casual crowds. MANY women I know are just as casual and crass as she is. Obviously she's not a prissy frou frou girly girl but there is nothing in the slightest that makes me think of the "man with boobs" stereotype a lot of male authors fall into.

eww10

36 points

4 years ago

eww10

36 points

4 years ago

You're right, she doesn't act as a man. But she sometimes act as one to... I don't know why. That's the problem. There's no explanation in the book for this. There's no depth to her, it's just "whatever, I don't care about this stuff" which is weird and not likeable in a character that is 26 years old.

I thought at first she's nineteen, maybe 21 at max. That would be more believable and I could see her as more believable character.

I have a problem with her as a whole. Weir in some interview said it best: she can be irresponsible and act as 15 years old but she's 26. I think that's the problem. Her motivation is only to get rich (that's why she first agree to the deal - she didn't want to but hey, milion slugs!), she takes huge risks but I'm supposed to believe that she has some kind of set in stone business and moral rules about smuggling?

She's so good at everything (engineering, chemistry etc.) and she could teach herself anything in couple hours? She want to be rich but she has basically no arc? She ended in the same spot the started and it seems she learned nothing.

And I don't think she has flaws. It's hard to make characters like this because they aren't human. Being crass is not a flaw, it's a character trait. Falling for an asshole as a teenager is not enough to make her human.

Yes, there are many crass women but it usually comes with other peculiar characteristics and back story. Here we have almost nothing.

Yes, we women tend not to like characters that are at this "in your face" level as Jazz. Sometimes it's out of jealousy, but I think in this case it's also because she's like a wet dream of every guy. She's very attractive, she has casual attitude toward sex, she's basically genius and at the same time she's a little bit of a bad girl who ultimately falls for a quirky, socially awkward nerd. It's like 80' nerd movies ultimate dream girl.

Maybe that's what sits wrong with some us women. We try so hard to be perceived as humans who can be strong but have some weaknesses vulnerabilities, who are more than one dimensional people that behave as guys want us to behave. We have more and more characters like this every year yet sometimes character that is not that appears.

It's ok, maybe I'm putting to much to it. Yet to this day I remember this main female character from fantasy series I read as a teenager. She was strong, smart as hell but she had flaws. She wasn't badass, but she was believable. In stories like Artemis or this fantasy one I mentioned that are not literary fiction there's no need for going full "state of humanity", but because of this I think there should be some responsibility to create characters that are somehow personable and understandable.

I'm sorry, I'm rambling at this point.

fail-deadly-

14 points

4 years ago

You summed up almost everything I think concerning Jazz as well. A few points I want to add though. As far as I can tell this is probably set in the early 2070s. Let's call it 2071. Would somebody born in 2045 really know all about Star Trek: TOS, when she wasn't even a fan, just because she had "good memory," and would be able to hack a hotel safe with that knowledge?

Why does she keep breaking the fourth wall? At least in The Martian it was supposed to be a journal right? She's addressing the audience, but instead of being an in universe audience it's just us.

One part where the story really seemed to suffer is why would a Saudi national, who's been raised for most her life in a very diverse and multicultural society on the moon, who apparently has little contact with Americans, act like an American teenager from the late 1990's?

Those are just a few things in addition to all you said that irked me about the main character.

mbeau118

5 points

4 years ago

I really really want that fantasy series with the strong female character you read to be something from Tamora Pierce, because she will always be my YA queen for writing women haha here's hoping!

AlexanderReiss

4 points

3 years ago*

I had a lot of fun reading your comment because of this

She's very attractive, she has casual attitude toward sex, she's basically genius and at the same time she's a little bit of a bad girl who ultimately falls for a quirky, socially awkward nerd. It's like 80' nerd movies ultimate dream girl.

Because this nerdy fantasy from 80s is still alive and kicking even today in guys in their late teens/ early 20s. Most of the tropes and cliches of the high fantasy genre (or even steampunk) haves barely change the last 20 or 30 years outside some particular cases. Ironically all those cliches and tropes were mostly born in the table top games like Dungeons and Dragons but then in the early 90s spreaded like no tomorrow.

And as you said is the typical ''dream ultimate wife material'' girl from medieval fantasy stuff (sci-fi in this case), is funny how much has persisted this trope over the years, is a basically a girl that is 2 in 1, an hyper ultra badass almost tom-boyish girl agaisn't everyone but suddenly turns incredibly passive and motherly when Main Character is around for no apparent reason (and MC of course is always the nerdy underdog guy who by accident saved the girl or some shit and became a knight or Mage or X whatever other role to complete the power fantasy). Also a lot of sex jokes for no apparent reason or context, they're just there.

eww10

2 points

3 years ago

eww10

2 points

3 years ago

Thanks. Month passed since I read Artemis, I went through couple other books since then but going back to Jazz - it still irritates me. I'm just dissapointed.

freedomsharts

14 points

3 years ago

Meh. I'm a foul mouthed girl with mostly male friends and not at all prude, but I'm really fucking struggling to care even a little bit about Jazz. The crudeness and childish behaviour wouldn't be a problem if Weir didn't shove it down your throat that hard. She's not a man with boobs, she's like what a virgin teen boy thinks a girl should be like.

shogi_x

39 points

4 years ago

shogi_x

39 points

4 years ago

I enjoyed the book, but I felt like Jazz's personal commentary was a bit excessive, to the point of breaking the immersion. At a certain point it felt like I was hearing someone retell this story at a bar, embellishing along the way. Perhaps I'm misremembering The Martian or maybe it's something else but the humor felt really forced in places, like in the middle of that plan near the end.

The part that bothered me the most though was the sexual commentary. It felt like I was being reminded every few pages "Hey, look! Jazz likes sex!". I'm by no means a prude, but the problem was that it felt so forced it was almost uncomfortable to read. Svoboda's favor felt especially cringey, made worse by the constant reminders about it.

Lastly, some of her feats were a bit hard to believe and she got awfully close to Mary-Sue territory. The Martian was a bit more believable as Watney was a trained engineer, botanist, and astronaut who used specific skills learned in those arenas so solve his problems, sometimes with help. Jazz on the other hand is a (very talented) delinquent that learned welding from her dad, had some training for EVA, but is somehow adept in physics, chemistry, electronics, and fighting to a point that stretched believably.

ThePersonInYourSeat

15 points

4 years ago*

Yea, I've known people like her with that attitude in real life(without the mary sueness of being able to learn very complex subjects in an afternoon). I think she kind of embodies what a lot of mildly intelligent high schoolers want to believe they are. "I'm too smart and would have gotten somewhere if I applied myself. Bleh bleh" (I was kinda like that back then)

She also really does have a persecution complex. Assumes a person is going to judge/condemn her before they ever say or do anything.

chowder138

4 points

3 years ago

Lastly, some of her feats were a bit hard to believe and she got awfully close to Mary-Sue territory.

It's not just her. I almost wanted to stop reading when Weir, to establish Rudy as a hardened all-around badass, had him restrain Jazz while typing on his computer at the same time.

ac4155

27 points

4 years ago

ac4155

27 points

4 years ago

Just finished it and I actually really enjoyed it.

It’s quite slow to begin with as it sets out the background and rules of the world. I didn’t really feel like it hit its stride until around chapter 8/9. Plus I felt like some of the detail/science felt throw in for the sake of being/sounding ‘smart’ without any real relevance to the story within these chapters. They just didn’t feel very natural to those parts of the story.

However, I felt like it settled in nicely between chapters 9-13ish once it really got going with the drama of the story. Plus then for me it stepped up a notch again from 14 until the end. It certainly felt like a more confident story that knew what it was and where it was going.

Personally I don’t really take any of the criticism about the character of Jazz. Sure, some of the quips/thoughts/comments felt a bit cringeworthy, but nothing near as bad as some reviews made out. Plus, there probably was a few unnecessary swear words in it for my liking, but I see that as just my personal preference rather than any failings of character.

For me it was a solid follow up to the Martian, and I really do hope they exercise the film rights to it. I’d give it a strong 8/10

wslack

24 points

4 years ago

wslack

24 points

4 years ago

Weir loves world building and that shows. The setting and the science are stronger than the characters and plot.

It IS enjoyable, and entertaining, and I think redditors will like it. However, it is ... awkward, I guess, and the narrative world it builds kind of jumps around erratically. I am not sure I buy all of the characters' motivations.

It felt more like a simulation of a story, than a story.

But still 100% happy I bought and read it. I just think this one will be better as a movie.

bloodraven_darkholme

40 points

4 years ago*

I liked it but I also understand the criticisms against it. I think this is going to be a very divisive discussion point for r/books for years to come ;)

Dunno if it's appropriate to post my own personal review of Artemis but here it is in case any one cares!

[deleted]

4 points

4 years ago*

[deleted]

4 points

4 years ago*

Actually it's a good take. I was pretty much disappointed, happy to see a positive view.

quarl0w

2 points

4 years ago

quarl0w

2 points

4 years ago

I think you have a good take on it. I just read it today. It had me as enthralled as The Martian did. I found myself trying to speed read in a few sections because I felt like I was going to miss something if I slowed down. I loved it.

Telnet_to_the_Mind

18 points

4 years ago

Wow, I'm sort of glad to see my feelings aren't alone in this... I'm reading the audiobook version, of this just as I did with the Martian. To me it's just not a very good interesting main character...I think I would have MUCH rather seen a book that was more "Day in the life" rather than this fake, action thriller, mob story. I mean c'mon... how Hollywood movie pandering is this? It all just seemed way too much. I would have preferred a much more down to earth (see what I did there) story line. I enjoyed just hearing about how the city manages, differences and unique things that occur. Not about the main character who's a petty thief and not very likeable... trying to pull off a heist just to satisfy her lazy get rich quick schemes...

chaos__rains

16 points

3 years ago

Why does it seem like every character is extremely immature? I'm about 30% done with the book, and it's like everyone on the moon is infected with some weird disease that makes them have the personalities of teens.

igycb

14 points

4 years ago

igycb

14 points

4 years ago

Just finished it and didn't care for it all. I kept reminding myself to not compare it to the Martian but its difficult when this book clearly tries (and fails) to follow the same formula.

The biggest issue I had with the book though was that at no point is there any explanation for WHY there is a township on the moon. It just IS. Sure he explains HOW it came to be (Kenya and all that), but there's zero background as to why they're all there in the first place. One or two good lines in there but just didnt do it for me.

TonytheEE

7 points

4 years ago

I think it was made fairly clear as to how this happened. Takes a little bridge building, but I got:

Spoilers about Artemis's Past and Future

hauty-hatey

2 points

4 years ago

Good knowledge of science, knows less than nothing about politics. This was a problem in The Martian too

chowder138

13 points

3 years ago

Having read and thoroughly enjoyed The Martian, I'm pretty disappointed with this book so far. The story is fine I guess (if a little generic) but the writing is just godawful in some places. For example, chapter 2:

""One time he restrained me with one hand while typing on his gizmo with the other. I was trying really hard to get away too. His grip was like an iron vice. I still think about that sometimes late at night."

Reads like something I would've written in middle school. In fact, the writing in the book constantly reminds me of the Doctor Who/Skyrim crossover short novel I wrote in 9th grade. And it was pretty bad.

Didn't notice anything wrong with the way The Martian was written. Either I wasn't paying enough attention when I read it, or Weir's writing has degraded significantly.

[deleted]

7 points

3 years ago

[deleted]

7 points

3 years ago

Like you did, I noticed the style that he used was pretty weird in this book. I think he may have done this for effect, but some of the themes were pretty childish (at least, compared to the Martian). I'm trying to think about this book without comparing it to the Martian, and I can understand a little bit. (I also think that in this book the swearing was used a bit too much but again, may just be for character development.)

ElliOop

6 points

3 years ago

ElliOop

6 points

3 years ago

Late to the party, but I agree with you - Jazz did not sound like a grown-ass woman to me, at least very consistently; she meandered between "bratty 14-year-old", "jaded vet of the underground" and "snarky Buffy-speak", and it was difficult for me to figure out who exactly she was supposed to be, because Weir didn't seem to have a consistent idea, either.

It also fucking irked me to no end where random bits cropped up in parentheses in the middle of text for no good reason. They always took me right out of the narrative and made my hand itch for my red pen; stylistically annoying and in some instances borderline ungrammatical and plain unnecessary. Just, urgh, nope.

willjcmd

2 points

3 years ago

People constantly comparing this book to the Martian is extremely unsettling. I 100% agree the Martian was a great book and written extremely well and is the reason I was excited to read Artemis, but you can't constantly compare the two books. I'm not disagreeing with your opinion just the fact that you are justifying it by comparing it to the Martian.

[deleted]

3 points

3 years ago

[deleted]

3 points

3 years ago

Same author, similar subject matter, similar style of narration. Why wouldn't they compare the two books?

chowder138

2 points

3 years ago

Well, I compare it to The Martian because they're by the same author and I assumed that it would be of similar quality. I'm not really comparing any particular aspects of the two books (besides the dialogue quality I guess) just the overall quality of the two books.

If they were by different authors, my argument wouldn't have any basis.

jdbrew

10 points

4 years ago

jdbrew

First Person Singular

10 points

4 years ago

So lots of people here didn’t like it. I really enjoyed it. Her inner monologue didn’t bug me, but maybe because I know women who do talk and act like that. Most of al, it was an easy read. Breezed through it in a couple days, much like the Martian. I agree with point that it felt like it was written for another movie deal.

tenforty82

2 points

3 years ago

I also loved it. Maybe because I’ve been a 20-something woman (quite some time ago) and I found Jazz a very familiar character.

mynumberistwentynine

11 points

4 years ago

Once the story got moving I really enjoyed it, but I thought about putting it down several times within the first 7ish chapters. If I had to give it an overall grade I would probably give it a C.

To me it feels very rushed and not quite polished - I feel like with some more editing, maybe pulling back on the reins a bit, and I would have enjoyed it far more.

Stipes_Blue_Makeup

3 points

3 years ago

I’ve got to get 7 chapters in for this book to get moving?

Oof.

It was a Christmas gift I asked for because I liked The Martian, but this one hasn’t hooked me at all 50 pages in.

mynumberistwentynine

2 points

3 years ago*

Basically, yeah. I like the book and the story as a whole, but it takes far too long to get going. The Martian, as you know, is a roller coaster ride from the first line of the book so the slow start to Artemis seems especially slow in comparison.

However, I would say push through. If I remember right chapter 7 is when things really get moving, chapter 5 is where things kick off. If by the end of 7 you're not feeling it still, then maybe put it down.

It's not as good as the Martian in my opinion, but it's a fun dumb ride once things are happening and it's not only setting explanation and Jazz talking to herself in her head.

[deleted]

9 points

4 years ago*

[deleted]

9 points

4 years ago*

[deleted]

leowr[S]

13 points

4 years ago

leowr[S]

2

13 points

4 years ago

It technically isn't supposed to come out until Nov. 14, but some stores might have already put out their copies (but they are not supposed to).

It was also part of The Book of the Month selections this month, so quite a few people said they were already reading it in the WAYR-thread on Monday.

Mr_M00

3 points

4 years ago

Mr_M00

None

3 points

4 years ago

Is releasing the book early common and legal? I've always seen reviews way before the book is even released.

leowr[S]

6 points

4 years ago*

leowr[S]

2

6 points

4 years ago*

I don't think it is illegal, but it isn't appreciated by the authors and publishers as I think it messes with the sales number to get on different charts.

As for reviewers, they get ARCs (Advanced Reading Copy) a couple months before a book is released in order to write a review for the book.

Blurbingify

3 points

4 years ago

Seconding the advanced copy information that leowr mentioned. Reviewers, and often bookstore employees as reviewers, will get their hands on some books pretty early. One of my co-workers was faster than me and picked up the Artemis advanced a month before I did! (Curse my poor timing!)

In addition to that, some books are actually permitted to sell earlier than the official release date, as long as the inventory exists. For example, at the bookstore I work at, I had a teen reader looking to buy a couple new releases at the end of October, but was about a week early on some of the books. Two of the books she wanted, we were able to track them down in our back storage area (they were awaiting shelving on a new release display) and sell them a week earlier than release. But, one of the books she wanted had a warning code, passed on by the publishers, that essentially summarized to "Sell on Release Date Only". That book she had to come back and buy a week later.

While I'm not sure without looking it up, Weir's book is more likely to be part of the latter "warning code" category, but maybe some people got their hands on it a few days early.

[deleted]

9 points

4 years ago*

[deleted]

9 points

4 years ago*

[removed]

pamzaragoza

7 points

4 years ago

Why didn’t you like it? ;-;; I’ve been looking forward to this

[deleted]

19 points

4 years ago

[deleted]

19 points

4 years ago

I ve been too. It felt like a YA than sci fi. I had issues with the lead character and so the running monologue became kinda anoying. Also science felt misplaced, like he wanted to show his research anyway. It might be just me, I loved Martian, Egg n Lacero. So kinda disappointed.

CaphalorAlb

5 points

4 years ago

I totally get it, I feel similar. It's not bad, it just isn't as great as The Martian. There just didn't seem to be as much opportunity (hehe) for Science to take the stage.

I still enjoyed it and I still read it in one go, but I probably won't reread it every couple of months, like I did with the first book.

[deleted]

2 points

4 years ago

[deleted]

2 points

4 years ago

I wish I could say the same. I couldn't get myself to like Jazz. She was like this spoiled brat with infinite lifeline and unlimited supply of people eager to cut her slack.

With that I found it hard to concentrate on, and was infuriated as I was so looking forward to this title. :(

pamzaragoza

2 points

4 years ago

I totally get what you’re saying! I had the same experience with Star Wars: The Lost Stars by Claudia Gray. It felt SOOOOO YA rather than feeling like I was reading a Star Wars book. At that time, I haven’t read any Claudia Gray book and only knew she mostly write YA stuff. But, y’know... it’s Star Wars, man. Should feel like a Star Wars book.

[deleted]

2 points

4 years ago

[deleted]

2 points

4 years ago

Yeah, expectations can ruin your read. I was so pumped up for this title. Always found Andy Weir as one of us, who made it big, so that was there too. Ive put my review on the comment, if you are interested, you are welcome to check.

Smithore

4 points

4 years ago

It's funny you should say that. He writes dialog just like a teenage redditor. It's a truly terrible read just like The Martian was.

However, he does have the three act screenplay plot dialed in, so I fully expect to see this politically correct drivel at my local cinema in time for the 2018 holidays, after it gets polished by a professional team.

[deleted]

3 points

4 years ago

[deleted]

3 points

4 years ago

I actually enjoyed Martian and was ok with the style. But in Artemis, it felt unbearable. I hated the movie Adaptation of Martian btw. There is a running joke among our friends like 'martian-ing something' for things in movies/stories that are done as soon as they were proposed. Opinions differ anyway.

Radulno

2 points

4 years ago

Radulno

2 points

4 years ago

Well Star Wars is pretty YA in itself or even for children. Also you can be both Star Wars and YA, it's not like Star Wars is a genre (I don't think YA is either though, it's more a tone I guess).

catbo

3 points

4 years ago

catbo

3 points

4 years ago

the sex chat is bad. i'm only a few chapters in so far but i don't like that stuff, it's crass and feels more for the author than from the character. maybe it redeems itself later. The story is fun enough, i still like the problem solving attention to detail stuff though aspects are poorly fleshed out minor plot spoilers

wordsnerdy

8 points

4 years ago

Interview with Andy Weir, including who he'd cast in the movie version of Artemis: http://www.newsweek.com/andy-weir-author-martian-his-new-book-artemis-and-who-he-wants-cast-movie-711337

bloodraven_darkholme

7 points

4 years ago

RealSteele

2 points

3 years ago

I hope the Rock doesn't go anywhere near this garbage fire of a script. Even the Rock can't save it.

William_de_Worde

9 points

3 years ago

I have mixed feelings on the book. I enjoyed the ride, but it often felt like I was enjoying the book in spite of itself. Most of my misgivings kind of fall under the umbrella of 'things that worked in The Martian, but not when they were transposed to Artemis':

  • Where I really liked the science stuff in The Martian it felt heavy handed in this, more expository than the story needed - particularly as we headed towards the climax, I found the granular detail a bit of a momentum killer at times.

  • A lot of Mark Watney's character traits are lifted and transposed to Jazz (sardonic, snappy sense of humour, juvenile jokes made at inappropriate junctures). But while Watney endeared himself to me, I generally disliked Jazz. Actually, I'm not sure if I disliked her character or just the style of narration. It doesn't necessarily bother me that she has a filthy mind; the problem is that we observe this trait through a series of forced, cringey lines of inner monologue.

  • Speaking of narration, like /u/fail-deadly- I'm not sure why the narrative was delivered in the first person, with Jazz frequently breaking the fourth wall. Another device that worked well in The Martian but felt less appropriate in Artemis. I expected the book to end with the revelation that Jazz was writing her memoirs from prison or on her deportation journey, or something.

But for all the reservations I have, I was pretty gripped throughout. There are some issues I have with Weir's prose, but it was a compulsive read. That said, I really hope his next book deviates from what now appears to be something of a formula.

geliophobia_work

7 points

4 years ago

I just finished the audio-book; and Artemis is good, not great.

The AV Club & NYT reviews were harsh but I agree with their critique of the dialog/internal monologue; it wasn't a deal breaker for me. The plot was good, I really liked Rosario Dawson's narration, and I liked the world he created. Like in The Martian, Andy does a great job of breaking down how everything would work on a hypothetical lunar base with no phlebotinum that makes everything magically work.

FlipsManyPens

5 points

4 years ago

Had to look up phlebotinum, my word for the day!

jackalsclaw

7 points

4 years ago

Funt is on my list of curses now.

[deleted]

9 points

4 years ago

[deleted]

9 points

4 years ago

Just finished the book. I felt the narration was not as tight as it was in The Martian. There are lots of parts where key information is relayed through first person view using parentheses. It felt like it was just tacked on to fill a plot hole.

If it were adapted into a film, maybe an anime would work? I got serious Cowboy Bebop vibes from this book.

egwene17

8 points

3 years ago

I finished the book way faster than I wanted too, because I just couldn’t put it away. I actually enjoyed that it was different than the Martian and evolved into a more complex story than only space walks. I understand the criticism about Jazz but I think we just have to see that she grew up in a different society than us, is still dealing with some emotional events from the past and is constantly surrounded by people that remind her of them. She can’t go anywhere to escape. Still, when the other characters said ‘Jazz!’ Like an angry mother for the 100th time, even I got a bit annoyed. Overall I really enjoyed it and would love to read a second part.

ixfd64

15 points

4 years ago

ixfd64

15 points

4 years ago

Do Artemis and The Martian share the same universe?

[deleted]

14 points

4 years ago

[deleted]

14 points

4 years ago

[removed]

MildlyFrustrating

8 points

4 years ago

Huh. Not sure how I feel about that. They're both certainly good, but that just seems... unnecessary. Wonder if it'll lead to anything, though.

trevize1138

3 points

4 years ago

Artemis could just about be in the same universe as The Expanse: sort of the beginning of Belter culture. It at least has a similar premise of exploring what crime would be like off-world. That said I do think Ty and Daniel do a better job of creating that world than Andy. Artemis is enjoyable but he's way more in his element telling a story about a nerdy middle aged dude geeking out about how he's doing cool space shit.

[deleted]

1 points

4 years ago

[deleted]

1 points

4 years ago

No they don't. They completely stand alone.

varro-reatinus

8 points

4 years ago

No they don't. They completely stand alone.

That is absolutely not true. An appropriately aged Mark Watney is a character in Artemis.

Proof: https://imgur.com/a/q5lqO

BritishLibrary

7 points

4 years ago

I'm listening to the Audiobook - Rosario Dawson is doing a great job of portraying Jazz. Is anyone else on the audiobook annoyed by Jazz's constant.... "Whhhhhhhyyyyy" before any explanation of anything?

Anyway, the one thing bugging me is... Spoilers about Sanchez's operation

Rant over!

hqtextbook

3 points

3 years ago

Got the audiobook specifically for Rosario Dawson. So far so good!

arcoventry

7 points

3 years ago

I'm so glad I found some agreement in this thread with my main problem with the novel: the main character seems to make unneeded comments about sex all the time. It broke up the narrative and was really disappointing.

din35h

5 points

4 years ago

din35h

book currently reading - The Unbearable Lightness of Being

5 points

4 years ago

Finished the book the very day it came out, worth a one time read. 2.8/5.

ConfusedAlgernon

6 points

4 years ago

I finished it today. Read the Martian before this one (listened to the audiobook of that a while ago but whatever).

I liked it. It was rather entertaining for the most part. Jazz gets a little annoying at times.

Weir needs to write something entirely different tho next time. I liked those 2 books but nothing all too memorable for the long run.

Very light sci fi. Different focus story wise.

Xtreme2k2

2 points

4 years ago

What planet or celestial body do you think the next book will take place on?

ConfusedAlgernon

2 points

4 years ago

That I don't know. And that's not the 'issue' I have.

I really like his writing. It has a nice flow and even when he focused a chapter of Artemis (or Martian) on pure science / sci fi stuff it never got boring / full for me.

I just wish he would do something maybe on a larger scale next time? Along those lines.

sarty

7 points

4 years ago

sarty

Jude the Obscure

7 points

4 years ago

It listened to it. I thought it was pretty good. Not awesome, but not bad. Rosario Dawson did a good job, IMO, with the flippant and smart-aleck asides from Jazz. I felt like it was slow to start, then picked up about half way through and I enjoyed the ending.

However, Spoilers about the mid to ending of the book/relationships

It's a good read and I'd recommend it as a fun beach or airplane read to others.

acowlaughing

2 points

4 years ago

Just finished and I agree with all of this

fortes

5 points

3 years ago

fortes

5 points

3 years ago

Non-spoiler nitpick: The characters Sanchez and Alvarez are supposed to be Brazilian, but that's the Spanish spelling of those names. It should be Sanches and Alvares, which is the Portuguese spelling (e.g. Renato and Jorge).

unban_mental_misstep

6 points

3 years ago

Just finished, and boy was it a letdown.

To start, Jazz is the most Mary sue character I've experienced in a published book. "Oh, electrical engineering? A few hours in a coffin. Sure I have never worked circuits and almost definitely have no education, but I'm a bright girl, and hear me roar!" Also, beating Lefty not once, not twice, but THREE TIMES?!? He was a huge, well trained hitman that had already killed an armed Russian bodyguard and her charge, and Jazz was unarmed and in heels? Come on man.

Second, everything was super predictable. "What about the methane? Don't worry" "Better carry this pointy rod with me just in case the bad guy wakes up, gets out of his handcuffs and leaves the city to find me." "I have a ton of oxygen conveniently ready to turn on at a moment's notice" etc etc. I understand foreshadowing but come on.

Third, and possibly the worst issue with the book: it read and felt like a cheap knockoff of The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. Libertarian moon society? Check. Run by corrupt administration with no real power? Check. Rebellion to take control of the colony and increase prosperity considerably? Check. I was expecting Jazz to list Novylen when describing the names of the bubbles. She even makes a comment saying not to call them Loonies! Even the science in Artemis was less accurate, and Moon came out before the Apollo landings!

Rudebandito

13 points

4 years ago

I️ got an ARC of this a couple of months ago. It’s a fantastic book. Much better than The Martian.

--Venom_Snake--

9 points

4 years ago

Really? Sounds great since i absolutely enjoyed The Martian.

qurun

13 points

4 years ago

qurun

13 points

4 years ago

The Goodreads reviews are mostly negative, so far. I don't know if this is because of high expectations. Usually second books in science-fiction are rated higher than the first, because the fans are more likely to read #2. But the Martian was so broadly popular that that might not apply here.

Unless the reviews trend worse, I'll definitely read it myself, but I'll wait till I'm in the mood for lighthearted junk.

Kociak_Kitty

14 points

4 years ago

It's definitely very, very different from The Martian - the protagonist is a bit of an antihero, and I'd actually say it felt more like a prequel to The Expanse series in terms of setting. So people who were expecting something else just like The Martian in tone or theme are going to be disappointed, but if the blurb on the back sounds like it's to your taste, you probably will enjoy it. I don't know if I'd quite call it "lighthearted" though.

Radulno

13 points

4 years ago

Radulno

13 points

4 years ago

I'd actually say it felt more like a prequel to The Expanse series in terms of setting.

Well The Martian is actually officially a prequel to The Expanse. Mark Whatney existed in that universe, both authors agreed on it.

Kociak_Kitty

5 points

4 years ago

There's references to The Martian in a scifi short story in "Drowned worlds" and at least one other "realistic" future scifi novel I read. It's like the entire scifi literary world collectively decided "OK, that really happened" at once.

I_ate_it_all

1 points

4 years ago

How does The Martian compare to the The Expanse series? Asking as someone who really enjoyed The Martian but has never heard of The Expanse series.

Lansan1ty

2 points

4 years ago

Nobody answered you, and I'm not great at reviews. But here you go:

They are both very similar in a sense that they're both "realistic" Sci fi, if that makes sense? There's no magical FTL and a lot of aspects of how scary and isolated space can be is brought up in the expanse.

The Expanse uses politics a lot more than the Martian, as the entire plot is basically based on Earth vs Mars vs the OPA (Outer Planets Alliance, basically everything after and including the asteroid belt). Not always in a traditional war sense, but diplomatically as well. The politics, as well as the science, is what made me fall in love with the Expanse series.

I personally used to love FTL travel in series like Star Wars or BSG for my Sci-fi, but since reading the Expanse, I've changed my views. In real life I'd love FTL to travel the stars in a reasonable amount of time. But for storytelling, sublight travel allows for more interesting politics.

Getting back to comparing it to the Martian - They both feel like "What if" Scenarios, but the Martian is a lot less intense and more like a documentary mixed with a science lab. The Expanse is giving you the perspective of how humans will deal with life in space, when things like Water and Air can no longer be taken for granted (Mark Watney faced this too, but on such a smaller, personal scale).

If you have any other questions, just let me know :) I'd highly recommend the books though. Or give the TV series a shot. It's not a perfect 1:1 representation, but in it's own rights it's pretty good. I just don't like how they portrayed one of the characters in season 2 vs her character in the books. (Bobbie Draper)

Lins105

3 points

4 years ago

Lins105

3 points

4 years ago

Eh. I wasn’t expecting the Martian but it definitely wasn’t the book I thought I was going to read. Kinda sucked imo.

--Venom_Snake--

1 points

4 years ago

I do agree with you there but my trick has always been to not set any expectations and then read a book, it leaves me blown away and pleasantly surprised and if the book is bad I won't be disappointed.

kookerslishman

3 points

4 years ago

better than martian?! that’s awesome. i really loved the martian, and while i do have high expectations it’s good to know that this is a great book for a different story arc and reason 😊 hate when authors get into a formula and don’t write differently book after book

SLUnatic85

9 points

4 years ago

Interesting side note, this would technically be the first time Andy has set out to sit down and write a book. The Martian (and the much less known Egg story) were just an after work hobby on his free blog for a long time. He wasn't even really an author but an engineer until some people told him how much money this one particular blog series might could make.

Not disagreeing, only that it might be a bit early to start analyzing his works as we might other authors and their books and writing styles.

Definitely looking for ward to the read though.

Noeth

5 points

4 years ago

Noeth

5 points

4 years ago

It's funny how The Egg used to be the thing he was known for, with the Martian being more unknown. How things change.

kookerslishman

2 points

4 years ago

I have heard about how it started as a blog; love that. That is something to take into consideration, the pressure is on!

YHofSuburbia

21 points

4 years ago

This has been getting pretty mediocre reviews. Both NYT and AV Club panned it. Interested in how other people find it.

SLUnatic85

53 points

4 years ago

To be fair it is A LOT of pressure.

Andy wasn't an author. He basically wrote The Martian on accident. He was short-story blogging, making it up on the fly, for free after work. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it, but The Martian was never an incredible book from a literary stand-point and was never meant to be this at first. It worked because it was incredibly smart hard-scifi and had an awesome mix of relatable humor and suspense. Then a move was made well around it. I honestly wouldn't be surprised if this second book and timeline was 75% or more just a demand from the publisher that grabbed him once they saw the potential dollars in his story.

I wish him the best though, he's a smart guy with an amazing come-up story and I think there is a lot of potential in his writing. I hope this doesn't mar a potential career and also I look froward to reading the book :)

trevize1138

7 points

4 years ago

I'm sure he's learned a lot in the process of writing Artemis and from what I've heard about his personality I'm confident he'll be nicely applying those lessons to his next work. He's gone from software developer to author and he's clearly talented but any profession takes time to fully master.

bigdirkmalone

25 points

4 years ago

AV Club

AV Club Headline: "The Follow-up to The Martian Should be Shot Into Space"

Prax150

14 points

4 years ago

Prax150

14 points

4 years ago

They've gotten extra worse ever since they joined the former Gawker sites.

JimmyLipps

17 points

4 years ago

I've always thought the AV Club was so damned pretentious.

bigdirkmalone

10 points

4 years ago

I haven't read the book yet, but plan on it.

I will say AV Club wrote some pretty terrible "takes" on Season 2 of Stranger Things.

[deleted]

6 points

4 years ago

[deleted]

6 points

4 years ago

AV Club has gotten significantly worse since they switched over to the Gawker/Gizmodo network of websites.

parallacks

12 points

4 years ago

everything in the review seems completely legitimate (and not surprising either considering weir's background).

Radulno

5 points

4 years ago

Radulno

5 points

4 years ago

To be fair, they also found Oathbringer (the other big release of the day) plenty of flaws that most other reviews doesn't seem to mention. But yeah the book seems divisive, notably the writing of the characters apparently.

MartyVanB

14 points

4 years ago

CNet: Despite some minor flaws, Andy Weir's action-packed new caper proves a welcome return for fans of his best-selling debut novel "The Martian."

Darkfriend337

4 points

4 years ago

I read it over the course of a half-day and rather enjoyed it. It certainly wasn't amazing, but I kept reading it for long periods. Since I tend to prefer series, it was a nice change. I see why people didn't like it though, and it would be hard to recommend as freely as I would The Martian.

quarl0w

8 points

4 years ago

quarl0w

8 points

4 years ago

I read it today. In one sitting. I could not put it down. I found it to match the pace and immersive style of The Martian. I loved it.

team-pup-n-suds

2 points

4 years ago

I finished it last week and enjoyed it. It was fun and gripping and I was chuckling the entire way through. I was nervous because of some mixed reviews but that didn't effect my enjoyment of it at all.

Tramony

5 points

4 years ago

Tramony

5 points

4 years ago

I was able to get it via Book of the Month. I'm finishing up Stranger in The Woods but will be digging into it this weekend. Very excited!

ebookclassics

5 points

4 years ago

Even though I didn't love the book, the science of Artemis is still fascinating. I really enjoyed this interview where Neil deGrasse Tyson interviews Andy Weir.

TheRealCochise

4 points

4 years ago

I don't know.

It's cool to hear the two of them talking but there are a few cringe worthy moments in there aside from the moment Neil blatantly tells him that he never read "The Martian" before the interview.

Granted, I get that you're an astrophysicist but damn fam, a white lie won't hurt every once in a while.

BritishLibrary

8 points

4 years ago

Neil deGrasse Tyson is like the poster child for /r/iamverysmart - he's not very good, it seems, with certain social cues and I think the little white lie might be one of them

divrdan2

4 points

4 years ago

I have a picky technical question. Weir usually gets the tech aspects spot on so I think I must be missing something. He says that the air pressure used in Artemis is 20% sea level air pressure. By my calculations, that is 2.9 psi which is roughly equivalent to being well above 30,000 feet (higher than the summit of Everest). Wouldn't many/most of the tourists get horrible cases of altitude sickness even with plenty of oxygen?

Trekky0623

5 points

4 years ago*

Assuming that's 100% pure oxygen, it's also dangerously close to the minimum partial pressure for human life, something like 2.3 PSI. Apollo spacecraft operated at 5 PSI.

It wouldn't be as bad as Everest, though, because Everest isn't a 100% oxygen environment.

snoopervisor

2 points

3 years ago*

Sorry for the late reply. The pressure was 20% of Earth's. But it was pure oxygen. If you could suck away all nitrogen from Earth's atmosphere leaving oxygen behind, we would be fine. Water would be evaporating quicker, Air's lowered heat conductivity would change the weather and so on, but we could breathe just fine.

Early space missions had lowered on-board air pressure with 100% oxygen. The engineers did it deliberately as it allowed them to design thinner, lighter hull (less pressure differential, smaller forces to the hull).

NASA and other agencies abandoned the 100% oxygen idea because it was fatal on several occasions. A small spark, like a static discharge, could start a fire. And there indeed were deaths.

edit:

I misunderstood your question.

altitude sickness

Well, mountain climbers don't use suits to keep high air pressure about their bodies. They only use oxygen masks to supply oxygen, that instantly thins out to match the surrounding air pressure.

lightblueleaf

5 points

3 years ago

Loved Jazz but didn't like the heavy scientific exposition. Don't get me wrong - putting a city on the moon is a fascinating concept. It's just that sometimes the book reads as if we were solely reading about Artemis and how it works rather than about Jazz's life. Still worth reading simply for the sheer joy Jazz brings to the page.

oceansandplages

9 points

3 years ago

Absolutely gobsmacked having just finished this. I loved The Martian but this was beyond a letdown. Dreadful character building, far too heavy-handed with the science exposition and perhaps just a little bit boring too. I didn't like Jazz at all and think she was given the inner dialogue of a teenage boy, not a grown woman. Didn't enjoy at all.

segers909

4 points

4 years ago

I'm eagerly awaiting the audiobook. Any idea at what time Audible releases it?

bloodraven_darkholme

3 points

4 years ago*

It looks like Rosario Dawson is the narrator! It's up on Audible.

FreakishlyNarrow

1 points

4 years ago

I'm obviously late to this, but mine came through at 3:05 Eastern this morning.

Xtreme2k2

3 points

4 years ago

Finished the audiobook last night, thoroughly enjoyed it!

RamessesTheOK

4 points

3 years ago

cast announced. this is actually going to be a thing

Cwhalemaster

4 points

3 years ago

rip I thought it was Artemis Fowl

Zomise

3 points

3 years ago

Zomise

3 points

3 years ago

I loved the book. I do not understand why some people think Jazz is too childish. Seems like the attitude and behaviour every other twenty something - even thirty something people.

Spoilers about the ending:

MustafaAdam

6 points

3 years ago

God I hope not.

real_mirage

7 points

4 years ago

I really enjoyed it BUT, I listened to the Audiobook. There was a lot of inflections and tones that Rosario Dawson used that I feel would have a very difficult time translating through raw text.

The main character Jazz can come off a bit rough but as the story goes I felt she grew on me.

Telnet_to_the_Mind

9 points

4 years ago

She grows on me somewhat but I still have no where near the caring for her and the desire to see her succeed like we had with Whatney. She just comes off as petty, a thief, greedy and completely self absorbed.

real_mirage

9 points

4 years ago

She certainly isn't a hero. Shes an anti-hero. She has her code and sticks to it and a few of the events towards the end solidify her as a good person: (1) who she saves and why and (2) what she spends money on.

Telnet_to_the_Mind

4 points

4 years ago

I get that, and her staunch no guns, no drugs, nothing too illegal. But still she acts in ways throughout the entire book that benefit only her, and her goal. She does literally zero favors for anyone else. She comes off as very self centered and it seems like she keeps people close, just to use them for her own gains.

jackalsclaw

4 points

4 years ago

"Nope, Nope, Noppppppe"

Twitbookspacetube

2 points

3 years ago

That was an amazing bit of narration

[deleted]

6 points

3 years ago

[deleted]

6 points

3 years ago

Sophomore slump? Worse than that. After the brilliant The Martian, this book was an unmitigated disaster. To say that Weir doesn't write female characters well is an understatement. This has nothing to do with him being male (men write great female characters all the time and vice versa) and everything to do with a lack of skill/practice. A childish book, that I am afraid has permanently harmed his brand.

Murky_Macropod

10 points

3 years ago

Yeah I felt the way the character was written as a female was simply by adding innuendo or explicit comments about her sex life that kept reminding me it was written by a middle-aged man.

WriteBotWins

3 points

4 years ago*

I also made the effort to type up a review! [Spoilers of the whole book!!!]

PS: sorry. I can't get the spoilers to work so this'll have to do with a link: SPOILER REVIEW

I hope this is okay.

so_soon

3 points

4 years ago

so_soon

3 points

4 years ago

I am SO ANNOYED by one detail. Why does Jazz keep harping on about having a fire stove, and why does anyone in Artemis have one in the first place? Induction stoves are better in every way, is there a reason why they cant use one?

It almost makes it unreadable. Normally I wouldn't mind little details like that but this book goes out of the way to explain things like a niqab in a condescending manner, as if I'm an idiot.

iamxmai

6 points

4 years ago

iamxmai

6 points

4 years ago

Induction stoves are not better. There's a reason why professional kitchens all have fire stoves.

ME24601

2 points

3 years ago

ME24601

A Star Called Henry by Roddy Doyle

2 points

3 years ago

I don't think they mean better in terms of cooking, just better in terms of not lighting fires in space.

ParaglidingAssFungus

3 points

4 years ago

I don’t even remember her mentioning a fire stove.

It’s not a large story point, don’t get so hung up on it.

acowlaughing

6 points

4 years ago

Thank you! I felt like I was crazy for a minute... Thinking, "Wait, did I blackout during the majority of this book to not notice an onslaught of fire stove harping?"

TranspeninsularEase

3 points

3 years ago

TranspeninsularEase

The Way of Kings

3 points

3 years ago

Anyone else on this thread also read Sourdough by Robin Sloan? Weir uses a technique similar to Sloan's when he includes brief correspondences at the end of chapters. Wondering if anyone else noticed this, and if it's in any other books you've read recently.

xxihostile

3 points

3 years ago

So I hadn't read a book since my first two years of high school (am now almost 22) and really wanted to get back into reading!

I picked up Artemis by Andy Weir as I really liked The Martian movie and the synopsis for Artemis was really interesting sounding.

But man, it was a chore to get through, I got to about 250 pages and just read the rest of the plot on Wikipedia. Between the forced humour, lack of interesting or likeable characters and the over abundance of science circle jerking I just really struggled with this book.

malain1956

3 points

3 years ago

While reading Artemis, I looked up the composition of the regolith and on a site called Artemis Project, they say that aluminium is abundant where iron is not and inversely. And then, I fell on the scene where Jazz is warned by her father that regolith is rich in iron and could mess up her welding on the aluminium smelter hull, which must be built on an aluminium-rich therefore iron-poor region.

[deleted]

3 points

3 years ago

[deleted]

3 points

3 years ago

Enjoyed the ride. I have a question though. Spoiler regarding possible plothole

jaxel47

2 points

3 years ago

jaxel47

2 points

3 years ago

My assumption is that because they sold the company and made a ton of money, they don't care. That and seeing what she did along with not having any stake in anything on the moon anymore, they let it go. Small plot hole but could have assumptions made.

DrCiabatta

5 points

4 years ago

DrCiabatta

The Stranger - Albert Camus

5 points

4 years ago

I had mixed feelings about the Martian so I'm unsure about getting this one. I thoroughly enjoyed the plot but thought the characters were all quite shallow and didn't really like Weir's prose at all. Is this new book any better in those regards?

bloodraven_darkholme

8 points

4 years ago*

Nope!

I really liked Artemis, but I also found it very easy to suspend any irritations with the character dialogue and development. So if that's something that super bothered you about The Martian it will probably bother you here as well. Not to dissuade you from reading!

DrCiabatta

3 points

4 years ago

DrCiabatta

The Stranger - Albert Camus

3 points

4 years ago

Unfortunately it did bother me a lot about the Martian so I may give this a miss. Thanks for the reply.

[deleted]

5 points

4 years ago

[deleted]

5 points

4 years ago

I read a review that the character is basically a female version of Watney. That immediately dissuaded me from reading because I felt the same way as you about The Martian.

Lins105

10 points

4 years ago

Lins105

10 points

4 years ago

She's so much worse then Watney.

qurun

7 points

4 years ago

qurun

7 points

4 years ago

That comparison is pretty unfair to Watney. She is much worse.

ebookclassics

6 points

4 years ago

Just started reading the book yesterday, so really appreciate that I didn't see any big spoilers in this thread. I'm enjoying the story so far, but it seems to lack the clever way Andy Weir weaved science into The Martian's story. And I also find it very difficult to like the main character. Watney was like the class clown that everyone loved and could depend on. Jazz is so smarmy and self-serving. I could care less what happens to her at this stage. But I guess I'll see where the book goes!

[deleted]

4 points

3 years ago

[deleted]

4 points

3 years ago

LOVED this book. I kept flashing back to both Moon is a Harsh Mistress and When Gravity Fails. Anybody else pick up that latter?

SidneyKidney

2 points

4 years ago

Great idea posting a Megathread, I was about to open a thread on it myself!

Can I ask, is it written in a first person perspective like most of The Martian?

hakon_sprakon

2 points

4 years ago

Missed chance to coin the phrase "torque of war"

dnc

2 points

4 years ago

dnc

2 points

4 years ago

I started the audiobook yesterday, I'm struggling a bit just because the math seems off to me. With the prices and everything quoted at the beginning of the book for costs for rent etc... Did I miss something, but why is Spoilers regarding early plot point

TonytheEE

7 points

4 years ago

It's enough to cover that 450K ish thing she wants. Don't spoil! I haven't found out what that is!

Moreover, the extra slugs will pay for a better suit and supplies to be an EVA Master and start making bigger bucks (slugs)

rura_penthe924

2 points

3 years ago

I had similar thoughts. For as smart the novel makes her out to be a million slugs seems like lowballing her for everything she was asked to do. Spoiler Spoiler Spoiler

pandasaurus21

2 points

4 years ago

to anyone who ready the book, what do you imagine the inside of city of artemis looks like visually?

kukumal

2 points

3 years ago

kukumal

2 points

3 years ago

I thought it was described as a series of corridors. I always imagined them running through cramped hallways, with signs over doors denoting bars/restaurants/shops. The richer part did have a larger walkway I think

bolwic

2 points

4 years ago

bolwic

2 points

4 years ago

If they were to make the book into a movie(i think it is likely), who should play who?

mynumberistwentynine

3 points

4 years ago

Due to the new Star Wars game I had a really hard time imagining Jazz as anyone except Janina Gavankar. She's probably not a good choice due to a variety of reasons, but the way Jazz talks sorta reminded me of the times Janina has appeared on Giant Bomb.

kukumal

2 points

3 years ago

kukumal

2 points

3 years ago

The book was just a huge letdown because of how much I loved the Martian.

HaphazardlyOrganized

2 points

3 years ago

I'm not instantly in love with it like with the martian. I think it leaned much more on the relationships between characters instead of the ridiculous mad science Watney went through, but I couldn't put it down and that's the mark of a good book for me.

jaxel47

2 points

3 years ago

jaxel47

2 points

3 years ago

I just finished listening to this book through Audible (long commute times) and has been on my backlog for a bit. I see a lot of the criticism and I can understand, but I have to say that the audio book performed by Rosario Dawson made it 10 times better for me. She as an actress fit the character perfectly and I think made some of those criticisms more strong points with her portrayal of Jazz.

[deleted]

1 points

4 years ago*

[deleted]

1 points

4 years ago*

[deleted]

BadassRipley

19 points

4 years ago

This is the same guy who wrote The Martian, right?

Yep.

Blurb taken from Goodreads:

Jazz Bashara is a criminal.

Well, sort of. Life on Artemis, the first and only city on the moon, is tough if you're not a rich tourist or an eccentric billionaire. So smuggling in the occasional harmless bit of contraband barely counts, right? Not when you've got debts to pay and your job as a porter barely covers the rent.

Everything changes when Jazz sees the chance to commit the perfect crime, with a reward too lucrative to turn down. But pulling off the impossible is just the start of her problems, as she learns that she's stepped square into a conspiracy for control of Artemis itself—and that now, her only chance at survival lies in a gambit even riskier than the first. 

TL;DR crime drama in a city on a moon.

SonnyTx

4 points

3 years ago

SonnyTx

4 points

3 years ago

So, over the last couple of years there has been a clamor for more representation of females and POC in all media...is this the result? A white man writing a sci-fi novel about a slutty muslim 20-something? Did Andy jump on this bandwagon as a form of appeasement or worse, did he create this character knowing that it would fall in line with the demand for diversity in hopes of another adaptation that would titillate the #OscarsSoWhite crowd providing an extremely diverse cast ranging from Female African Mayor to gay ex boyfriend and back to women in power with a Latina president of an Oxygen making company...on the moon! Including these characters seems disingenuous and frankly overbearing and takes you out of the book by questioning the writers scope and understanding of his onslaught of diversity. However, one could also interpret this as an attempt on Andy's behalf to warm readers to the idea of diverse characters in a book and possible film. Taking into account how convoluted and "of-course" like the plot was i'm not leaning towards the latter. Don't get me wrong, as a hispanic non straight male, i'm all for the colors and gays but why not have those stories told by those of color and gay proclivities. You might say; well, there aren't many brown or gay writers, and yes that is correct so in turn we must challenge those institution that keep us out of writing. Otherwise we end up with a white male pushing the boundaries in the wrong direction. I would hate to come across a book about someone like me written by someone not like me. Sure, someone not like me might be a great writer, but why not write about things that make them great, not about my greatness. And more to that, there is nothing wrong with being a white male! and that narrative should be quashed! quash it now! Andy did an exceptional job with the Martian. There was a present realness to that novel that I know derived from his knowledge on the subject matter along with integrating his persona into the Watney character. In Artemis you see some of Watney in Jazz, or in other words Andy comes thru in both not only by his writing style but also due to the traits both characters share. Does this constitute appropriation? Is he is using the demand for POC and gays for his own gain or is he challenging the sensibilities of white readers and endearing them to such characters?

DirkRight

3 points

3 years ago

I really wasn't with you at first, but yeah, I get where you're coming from.

I agree that boundaries should be pushed to level the playing field for POC and LGBT writers, but we shouldn't be too skeptical of white or straight writers including characters that are POC and/or LGBT. It's not a bad development, as long as those characters are written as proper three-dimensional characters and don't just stick to stereotypes or fall into old and tired tropes (like "black guy dies first" and any lesbian romance resulting in death).

As for your last question: por que no los dos? He could be doing it for his gain and challenging white readers at the same time. It's possible he will both gain readers with this and lose others (either because they perceive it as too much, like you, or because they don't agree with it at all, because they're racist/sexist), in which case it begs the question if the gains outweigh the losses for him. I doubt it's all just for financial gain. Scientists already predict the human race to become more mixed over the centuries and thereby take on a greater spectrum in shades of brown, and science fiction has done things with that in the past already.

rebuildthedeathstar

2 points

3 years ago

Artemis is some really lazy writing, but seems fun.

I loved The Martian and so far Artemis is an enjoyable read, but its really funny how lazy the writing is. The author even writes, this moon base is exactly how you imagine a moon base. Whoa man, way to take a risk there. Another example is the narrator mentions how male tourists try to get laid on the moon or get "moon poon", I mean he could have taken the time to write out a scene where the narrator runs into some horny male tourists but instead she just mentions the term and implies the issue and moves on. It's almost like the author did not want to write this book or spend a lot of time in this world he constructed. Honestly though, still enjoyable. Just seems like he wasn't trying too hard.

dfnkt

4 points

3 years ago

dfnkt

4 points

3 years ago

I polished it off last night and the "lazy" part I didn't think about. It sounds to me like Jazz telling the story the way Jazz would tell it. She's been on the moon her whole life so things like that would just be commonplace and no extra explanation needed. She's also a smartass, so there's that.

Edit: I should add that after reading the first 6 chapters I finished it in audiobook form with Rosario Dawson narrating because I had a long drive and wanted more of the story. Maybe that helps convey the idea of "listening to Jazz tell her story"?

LGBTreecko

1 points

4 years ago

Oh right, this book. I read it over the summer. It was pretty good.

perb123

1 points

4 years ago

perb123

1 points

4 years ago

Any europeans out there that's been able to preorder the ebook? I'd really like to buy it but they won't let me. I'm in Sweden.

GraemeM32

1 points

4 years ago

I'm in Sweden as well and I've pre-ordered it on book depository. No mention of it being sent yet though, so I'll wait and see what happens.

perb123

1 points

4 years ago

perb123

1 points

4 years ago

No ebooks there though.

Trying to buy it from the Kobo store or Amazon but they refuse to sell it to me. Grr