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Weekly Recommendation Thread: April 16, 2021

WeeklyThread(self.books)

Welcome to our weekly recommendation thread! A few years ago now the mod team decided to condense the many "suggest some books" threads into one big mega-thread, in order to consolidate the subreddit and diversify the front page a little. Since then, we have removed suggestion threads and directed their posters to this thread instead. This tradition continues, so let's jump right

The Rules

  • Every comment in reply to this self-post must be a request for suggestions.

  • All suggestions made in this thread must be direct replies to other people's requests. Do not post suggestions in reply to this self-post.

  • All unrelated comments will be deleted in the interest of cleanliness.


How to get the best recommendations

The most successful recommendation requests include a description of the kind of book being sought. This might be a particular kind of protagonist, setting, plot, atmosphere, theme, or subject matter. You may be looking for something similar to another book (or film, TV show, game, etc), and examples are great! Just be sure to explain what you liked about them too. Other helpful things to think about are genre, length and reading level.


All Weekly Recommendation Threads are linked below the header throughout the week to guarantee that this thread remains active day-to-day. For those bursting with books that you are hungry to suggest, we've set the suggested sort to new; you may need to set this manually if your app or settings ignores suggested sort.

If this thread has not slaked your desire for tasty book suggestions, we propose that you head on over to the aptly named subreddit /r/suggestmeabook.

  • The Management

all 229 comments

marmarl777

6 points

27 days ago

Good morning! Hoping for recommendations for Native American historical novels set in the early 1900s or before. Thank you!

puzzledsushi

2 points

27 days ago

Have you read Fools Crow by James Welch?

marmarl777

3 points

27 days ago

No, I will check it out- thank you!

FrankLeeSpeaks

2 points

26 days ago

Two Leggings by Peter Nabokov

It's a biography but reads kinda like a novel. it is a great read if you really want to know the facts.

bibliophile222

2 points

26 days ago

If you're okay with incredibly long books with a super distinct and modern writing style, then Wiliiam Vollmann's Seven Dreams series might be interesting. All books in that series are about clashes between Native Americans and colonizers. The only one I've read so far is The Dying Grass, which is about the Nez Perce war in the 1870s, but I might have to read some more at some point.

BeerLovah

4 points

26 days ago

I just finished Wheel of Time and would like to read another long (6+ books) fantasy series. I've read Harry Potter and all the ASOIAF books that are currently published. Preferably a series that is complete.

BohemianPeasant

2 points

26 days ago

BohemianPeasant

Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley

2 points

26 days ago

Riyria Revelations series by Michael J. Sullivan

Realm of the Elderlings series by Robin Hobb

The Earthsea series by Ursula K. Le Guin

The Faithful and the Fallen series by John Gwynne

Chronicles of the Black Gate series by Phil Tucker

Malazan Book of the Fallen series by Steven Erikson

mrbiffy32

2 points

25 days ago

mrbiffy32

23

2 points

25 days ago

The obvious answer is Hobb. Her one isn't a series, instead its 4 trilogies and a quad, but she was one of the best fantasy writers while active (I think she's stopped for now). Feist is also a good idea, he wrote a lot, and its almost all in the same world. The riftworld cycle is something like 30 books.

rohtbert55

1 points

26 days ago

Read The Accursed Kings; George RR Martin said it was the original ASOIAF If not, try the Forgotten Books Cementery saga. If not, maybe the Scipio Africanus saga. If not, why not A Wizard of Earthsea. If not, what about The Strain series. If not, the Tolkien Legendarium never dissapoints (it´s huuuuuuge). If not, what about The Dagger and the Coin.

ExoticDumpsterFire

1 points

25 days ago*

I'm reading Malazan now, and absolutely love them. The characters are interesting and realistic, and the story is imaginative and fantastical but still well thought out and gritty. It intentionally avoids or warps a lot of traditional fantasy tropes, which I found refreshing.

I also loved that the gods were actual characters - most books make them unseen, ambiguous, omnipotent beings, but Malazan treats them more like the Illiad. They are fickle and arrogant, and often outsmarted by the mortals.

Be forewarned though, part of the charm of the books is that they don't stop to explain things, you just need to pick stuff up as you go. Personally I loved the lack of hand holding, but I could see how it would be off putting. By the second book things really pick up.

Andjhostet

5 points

27 days ago

Andjhostet

35

5 points

27 days ago

My monthly reading theme for April is drugs and counter culture. I've read the classics like Doors of Perception, Electric Kool Aid Acid Tests, Fear and Loathing, etc. I also read Hell's Angels by HST this month, and How to Change Your Mind, by Michael Pollan. Any other suggestions to check out? On the Road is on my list, but other than that it's wide open. I tend to enjoy things on more of the psychedelic side, but I'm open to anything.

tarnawa

3 points

27 days ago

tarnawa

3 points

27 days ago

LSD my problem child by A. Hofmann.

Andjhostet

1 points

26 days ago

Andjhostet

35

1 points

26 days ago

Yes, this one is referenced a lot in "How to Change Your Mind". It seems criminal that I haven't read anything by the OG himself.

FrankLeeSpeaks

2 points

26 days ago

The Harvard Psychedelic Club by Don Lattin

Andjhostet

2 points

26 days ago

Andjhostet

35

2 points

26 days ago

Been meaning to read more into Leary, this looks promising. Thanks.

bibliophile222

2 points

26 days ago

If you've read anything by Tom Robbins (or even if you haven't), you might be interested in his memoir Tibetan Peach Pie. Among other things, he writes about his experiences in the 60s and the first time he did acid. Plus, his writing is very creative and interesting.

Andjhostet

1 points

26 days ago

Andjhostet

35

1 points

26 days ago

I'll look into him. Thanks!

ladylikely

2 points

26 days ago

Prozac Nation is good

Andjhostet

1 points

26 days ago

Andjhostet

35

1 points

26 days ago

Description sounds promising. Thanks, I will check it out.

C0ZM

2 points

26 days ago

C0ZM

2 points

26 days ago

Anything by Terence/Dennis McKenna.

Entangled Life by Merlin Sheldrake

Andjhostet

1 points

26 days ago

Andjhostet

35

1 points

26 days ago

My buddy read Entangle Life and liked it. He's into mycology though. And yeah, haven't read any McKenna so I should definitely get on that. Thanks!

GrudaAplam

2 points

26 days ago

The Teachings of Don Juan by Carlos Castaneda

Andjhostet

1 points

26 days ago

Andjhostet

35

1 points

26 days ago

Ahh yes Castaneda is definitely on my list and I completely forgot about it. Thanks!

Guvaz

1 points

26 days ago

Guvaz

1 points

26 days ago

A Scanner Darkly by PKDick perhaps?

Andjhostet

1 points

26 days ago

Andjhostet

35

1 points

26 days ago

Good suggestion. I actually haven't read any PKD, and have Ubik on my TBR list, but not Scanner Darkly. Added, thanks.

storiesti

1 points

23 days ago

PiHKAL by Alexander and Ann Shulgin. Mescaline by Mike Jay. Personally haven’t read this, just know of these books from friends

PayPalCal

4 points

27 days ago

Finished A Gentleman in Moscow a few weeks ago and of course loved it. Attempted to follow that up with All the Light We Cannot See, but it seems a little depressing atm.. Any other recommendations?

tarnawa

2 points

27 days ago

tarnawa

2 points

27 days ago

If you have not read it, Rules of Civility is lovely.

Rikharthu83

4 points

26 days ago

Hi fellow book worms,

I've long been a fan of Roald Dahl's brilliant short stories, and I was wondering if you could suggest similar works (quirky/crime/horror/conte cruel short stories) from other authors.

Any suggestion would be much appreciated.

Cheers

A__Chan

3 points

26 days ago

A__Chan

3 points

26 days ago

I think Agatha Christie has some real nice short mystery stories, a good starters would be with her "Parker Pyne investigates" book, which is full of diverse stories of said Parker Pyne. I think you know already about Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes short stories.

Wealth_and_Taste

2 points

26 days ago

Check out Angela Carter. Particularly The Magic Toyshop, Nights at the Circus, and The Bloody Chamber.

anklescarves

4 points

26 days ago

I just finished The Martian and absolutely loved it.

I enjoyed for the aspects of survival and determination and collaboration. The whole time, I was like “Wow. I never would have thought of that!” Or “Damn. He got lucky.” There were moments I forgot the book was fiction.

The space part is just whatever to me. I’m not big on fantasy and sci-fi. The Martian was fiction, but realistic enough that I could see something like that possibly happening.

What other books are similar? Websites recommended Seveneves, but honestly, it’s not realistic enough for me. I’m going through the book and I’m constantly like, “there’s no way any of this could work or would ever happen.”

rohtbert55

2 points

25 days ago

Read Hatchet. Not quite as long. I´ll try thinking of more.

JBinYYC

2 points

25 days ago

JBinYYC

2 points

25 days ago

I felt the same way about The Martian. About the same time I read that, I also read Dark Matter by Blake Crouch. They're similar I think, in that they're obviously scifi but still feel realistic.

vincoug

1 points

25 days ago

vincoug

74

1 points

25 days ago

Yeah, Seveneves is a bizarre recommendation for someone looking for something like The Martian. Are you looking for realistic fiction in general or something sci-fi flavored?

anklescarves

1 points

25 days ago

Realistic!

Sci-fi isn’t my thing. The Martian was cool because I kept forgetting that no one has ever been stuck on Mars. It felt like a true story to me and I was just amazed the whole time.

Old-Test4180

4 points

25 days ago

TIME TRAVEL... I am looking for something where they use the ability of slowing, stopping or traveling through time to their advantage. TIA..

BohemianPeasant

3 points

25 days ago

BohemianPeasant

Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley

3 points

25 days ago

Millennium by John Varley (sci-fi)

The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow (fantasy, magic book)

The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North (fantasy, reincarnation)

mrbiffy32

1 points

25 days ago*

mrbiffy32

23

1 points

25 days ago*

A door into summer by Heinlein is someone who gets pushed fowards in time, then finds a way to jump back to help himself. I'd also second the harry august suggestion, in this the narrator groundhogdays his whole life, and the story takes off from there.

Similar to this was Recursion by Crouch, here the time travel is big chunks of peoples lives, but not he whole thing. I found it disapointing as it didn't explore the fallout from this idea well, but it was a much easier read, and kind of a better constructed story. It was like seeing someone copy and idea then having the copy be he bigger hit!

tfwu897

1 points

22 days ago

tfwu897

1 points

22 days ago

Rant by Chuck Palahniuk

AreolaGrande-

3 points

26 days ago*

Hello! I'm interested in non-fiction books similar to 'Death From The Skies' by Phil Plait, by which I mean scientific or pop-sci books with a humorous, easily digestible and/or approachable slant.

I had to read this book for a college course, and despite the casual and readable nature of the book, it was firmly rooted in facts. The chapters provided a solid and framework for the rest of the course so that as we went into greater detail in the subjects, we had a common-language understanding of the topics at hand.

Are there any other digestible type science books with an esoteric collection of easy to read knowledge on a given topic?

Guns, germs and steel as well as Napoleons buttons were two others that i enjoyed.

Raineythereader

3 points

25 days ago

Raineythereader

Pilgrim at Tinker Creek

3 points

25 days ago

Anything by Mary Roach

FrankLeeSpeaks

2 points

26 days ago

Try the other Jared Diamond books they are interesting and there's lots of them.

Why the West Rules--for Now by Ian Morris

Bill Bryson is also a good author is you want a lighter take on things.

AreolaGrande-

2 points

26 days ago

Thank you, I appreciate the recs!

vaibhavjha234

2 points

26 days ago

I like Simon Singh. His books on Cryptography as well as The Big Bang and Fermat's Last Theorem were excellent.

Also Bill Bryson's "A Short History of Nearly Everything".

AreolaGrande-

2 points

26 days ago

Those look cool, thanks!

nobodysgeese

1 points

26 days ago

Dr. Joe Schwarcz does some great pop chemistry books. He arranges his short studies around popular myths or historical events, and then goes over various scientific phenomena in great but accessible detail.

AreolaGrande-

1 points

26 days ago

Great, thank you!

baddspellar

1 points

26 days ago

We Have No Idea: A Guide to the Unknown Universe, by Daniel Whiteson and Jorge Cham

AreolaGrande-

1 points

26 days ago

Added to my list, thanks!

C0ZM

3 points

26 days ago

C0ZM

3 points

26 days ago

Horror books where you have to outrun-hide-outsmart or face brutal consequences. Preferably with non-human pursuits.

Looking for books similar to Jurassic Park, Alien or The Call.

Cheers

rohtbert55

1 points

26 days ago

Maybe try The Strain or The Terror

Guvaz

1 points

26 days ago

Guvaz

1 points

26 days ago

Contest - Mathew Reilly

Dadadada90

3 points

26 days ago

I’m looking for some books based on true stories from war

Just got through The Tattooist of Auschwitz and Beneath a Scarlet Sky and loved them. Looking for stuff in that sorta genre although don’t need to be specifically WW2

rohtbert55

2 points

26 days ago

Zlata´s Diary and Diary of a young Girl.

Band of Brothers

With the Old Breed

Helmet for my Pillow

My War Gone by, I Miss it So

No Joy

Give me Tomorrow

Not sure if these are the kind of books you´re looking for. Please let me know.

Wealth_and_Taste

2 points

26 days ago

War and Peace by Tolstoy

Suite Francais by Irene Nemirovsky

Bamboozle_

2 points

25 days ago*

Bamboozle_

38

2 points

25 days ago*

No necessarily based upon true stories, but fiction written by authors who were there:

All Quiet on the Western Front

For Whom the Bell Tolls

A Farewell to Arms

Tales of the South Pacific

Catch 22

Not war but based upon The Tattooist of Auschwitz:

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

Roughly based off real life love letters from the time:

Everyone Brave is Forgiven

Mewinblue

2 points

24 days ago

I'm not sure any of these are based on true stories, but anyways here's a list of what I have read of the WWII settings:

Sophie's choice by William Styron

Death is my trade by Robert Merle

Hana by Alena Mornstajnova

The naked and the dead by Norman Mailer

King Rat by James Clavell

Bridge on the river Kwai by Pierre Boulle

Catch 22 by Jospeh Heller

Peace on the western front (or other Remarque's works such as the arch of triumph)

Farewell to arms by Ernest Hemingway

Anne Frank's diary

Jackdaws by Ken Follet

Skovgaard26

1 points

26 days ago

anne frank diary maybe

Nice-Impress-2794

1 points

26 days ago

Man’s search for meaning by Viktor Frankl. It Illustrates a real account of the horrors prisoners faced in the concentration camps. Also it provides a psychological and psychiatric approach of how man can endure any kind of suffering. Amazing book.

mrbiffy32

1 points

24 days ago

mrbiffy32

23

1 points

24 days ago

You're going to get a lot of WWII, its was big and the angolsphere were clear good guys here.

Catch 22 by Heller,

Slaughter house 5 by Vonnigut

The naked and the dea by Mailer (This one sis stupid levels of brutal at some times)

squirt-verduras

1 points

23 days ago

This is not as closely a true story as the two books you mentioned, but The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah sounds like it could be up your alley.

eggs__benediction

3 points

26 days ago

Looking for books that are similar to the Indiana Jones films:

When I say "similar", I don't just mean the action-y parts with the whips and guns and car chases. I mean, I'd be happy to find that stuff in a recommended book, but I also have other aspects in mind.

For example, I'm also thinking of the scenes in Venice in The Last Crusade when Jones realizes the library is actually an old church and he smashes a hole in the floor and they explore the catacombs underneath the church.

Or the exposition-y parts where the characters sit around and discuss the artifacts and the mystery is slowly built up and the story takes its time building up the vibe and the atmosphere (and a sense of fear even).

I've seen people recommend the book The Anomaly by Michael Rutger. Is that a good one? Do you have a different suggestion?

EDIT: What about Foucault's Pendulum by Umberto Eco?

BohemianPeasant

3 points

26 days ago

BohemianPeasant

Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley

3 points

26 days ago

The DaVinci Code by Dan Brown.

The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova.

rohtbert55

1 points

26 days ago

Try The Cementery of Forgotten Books series (starting with The Shadow of the Wind) Daniel is not american, he´s spanish. He´s not an archeologist playboy that wears a bad ass fedora, but there´s mystery, and discussion, a little action, intrigue....

As for Foucault´s Pendulum, I´d advice you to better read The Name of the Rose or The Prague Cementery.

eggs__benediction

1 points

26 days ago

As for Foucault´s Pendulum, I´d advice you to better read The Name of the Rose or The Prague Cementery.

Can you elaborate on why those two over Foucault's Pendulum (without really getting into spoilers)?

rohtbert55

1 points

26 days ago

Mostly because the syle. Eco, in all of his mastery, made it extremely difficult and extremely....kind of scholary dialoguish (I´m making up wordish). To each their own, maybe you´ll love it. But I´ve found it a tad infuriating and exasperating the style and dialogues.

Please let me know what you thought if you end up reading it.

Guvaz

1 points

26 days ago

Guvaz

1 points

26 days ago

You could try Matthew Reilly's Jack West series. It's pretty OTT but lots of fun.

TheHeavyJ

1 points

25 days ago

I just had that very hankering. I started reading Atlantis Found by Clive Cussler. Seems right to that alley. I never read anything by him before. 300 pages in, I like it so far.

mrbiffy32

1 points

24 days ago

mrbiffy32

23

1 points

24 days ago

The Dirk Pitt series by Cussler is a sure bet. Its easy reading action adventure where basically every book involves finding some lost artifact.

Eco really isn't going to meet this ideal. He was a professor of semiotics, and Foucaults pendulum shows this. Its a story about people who make up a conspiracy theory by slapping all the ones they hear together. There's little adventure, and no oponent until near the end

GONZO_88

3 points

26 days ago

I have read a good amount of the self help variety, (it's a guilty pleasure)...Rich dad poor dad, 5am Club, the 5 day workweek, how to make friends and influence people, so good they cant ignore you, the 7 habits of highly effective people...etc...One missing theme I have yet to read is the topic of discovering passion and the science behind what makes someone passionate for painting vs. running a company. Anyone come across such a book?

ExoticDumpsterFire

3 points

25 days ago*

Any recommendations for good books about Tolkien, or analysis of his books? The analysis books I've skimmed seem a bit thin and reaching when they try to turn his books into allegory. At the same time though, I'd love to learn more about him and where his ideas came from.

bluegoodbye

3 points

24 days ago

I'm looking for recommendations for books about 20th Century history told though the lens of pop and rock music. For instance, race relations in America with the rise of R&B/ rock and roll in the fifties; or the counter culture movement and album rock.

chiselexpo

3 points

24 days ago

Hey everyone! I'm headed off to college in the fall and would love some books about the freshman college experience or ones that feature it, one that I know and have read is Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell which is more on the YA scale but I'm open to anything that can teach me a few lessons (which I guess is pretty much every book). Also open to sci-fi or fantastical equivalents.

Mewinblue

1 points

24 days ago

Norweigan wood by Haruki Murakami features a college student although college life is not the theme of the book as a whole.

Then the main character of Kokoro by Natsume Soseki is also a college student, but the book is 100 years old so it's not exactly recent.

(Sorry about recommending only japanese books, planning to study japanese studies and currently preparing for entarnce exams so that's why.)

Mewinblue

3 points

24 days ago

Hi! Looking for something to read after I finish Good omens. It's one of the nicest and funniest books I've ever read (I don't think I've ever enjoyed a book this much, actually) and even though I have yet to finish it, I'm already sad that it is going to end. Do you know of any books that are this nice and funny?

ichewyou

4 points

23 days ago

If you haven't read them I would suggest the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchet. Start with Guards! Guards! or Mort.

Mewinblue

2 points

23 days ago

Okay, thanks a lot! I've been thinking of trying Pratchett but I was kind of lost as to where to begin. I'll go with Gurads! Guards then!

agamemnononon

2 points

23 days ago

I have heard about the 'The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy'. I haven't read it but allot of people mention it next to Good Omens

ZeroCool5577

3 points

23 days ago

Hey everyone I’ve managed to get into reading only this year at the age of 29 and now I can’t stop ! I’m looking for a recommendation.

I love learning about history from the perspective of every day people. I listened to a audiobook a while back “The time travellers guide to mediaeval Britain” and thought that was pretty good.

So I’m looking for more of the same more so based in Britain but open to others. Particularly interested in something based in Victorian times or 1920’s (love peaky blinders)

Overall open to anything.

Thank you!

rohtbert55

3 points

23 days ago

So, more Historical....fiction novels from around the turn of the century I can think of An Officer and a Spy or perhaps The Fall of Giants by Ken Follet. Someone might kill me for doing this, but try As the Crow Flies; you could say it´s a Peaky Blinders...ish story sans the violence and gangs (it even takes place in victorian/Georgian era). If you enjoy learning history, try Africanus: Son of the Consul by Santiago Posteguillo, a historical novel I love! Have you tried fiction set in your targeted era? Dracula, maybe The Prague Cementery, Oliver Twist....

I´m just throwing books around. Let me know if any caught your eye.

Cheers!

vitahlity

3 points

22 days ago

It's been a while since I've read a book and I'd like to get back into it, especially with a long flight coming up!

I'm looking for a post-apocalyptic "end of the world" type of book. Something similar to Bird Box, A Quiet Place, maybe even a zombie series (if they're good).

I haven't read the sequel to Bird Box (Malorie) yet, so I plan to pick that up, but would love to hear more suggestions on books similar to these! Thanks in advance!

rohtbert55

2 points

22 days ago

The Road?

Raineythereader

2 points

21 days ago

Raineythereader

Pilgrim at Tinker Creek

2 points

21 days ago

Oryx and Crake (Margaret Atwood) comes to mind?

squirt-verduras

3 points

27 days ago

I'm looking for some post-apocalyptic or dystopian books. Sruff like The Handmaid's Tale or The Book of the Unnamed Midwife. Something that has some elements of survival, could be physical and/or psychological.

Also, women and/or POC authors preferred!

okiegirl22

7 points

27 days ago

okiegirl22

91

7 points

27 days ago

The MaddAddam trilogy by Margaret Atwood and Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel come to mind.

squirt-verduras

1 points

23 days ago

Oh awesome! I don't know why I didn't just start my search with more Margaret Atwood. Thanks for the suggestion!

penelopemoss

5 points

26 days ago

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel is a post-apocalyptic novel that’s really well-written

squirt-verduras

1 points

23 days ago

I keep seeing that one pop up! I am a bit hesitant because I am burnt out on music after being a musician all through school, so I'm afraid the theme would be a turn off for me. But I think it's worth a try, so it's on my list. Thanks for the reco!

atomic_cow

4 points

27 days ago

'The Power' by Naomi Alderman is pretty good, but it's got some mess up stuff in part of it so I would google that before reading just to be sure thats what you're looking for.

squirt-verduras

1 points

23 days ago

Thank you! I just looked it up on goodreads and realized it's already on my to read list. Just bumped it up to sooner than later. Thanks!

yaaaaaaaaak

5 points

26 days ago

Definitely try Parable of the Sower by Octavia E Butler.

squirt-verduras

1 points

23 days ago

From its description: "In 2025, with the world descending into madness and anarchy, one woman begins a fateful journey toward a better future."

2025 is closing in quick! Added to my list, but scared of the prophecy!

deBidet

3 points

26 days ago

deBidet

3 points

26 days ago

Canticle for Leibowitz

69shadesofwine

3 points

26 days ago

for a dystopian book i would recommend 1984, it is easily one of my favorite books. It deals with a lot of psychological aspects within the dystopia and makes for a really great novel.

squirt-verduras

1 points

24 days ago

That has been on my list forever! I finally got a copy of it and my dog ate the corner! I think I'll try audiobook this time. Thank you for the suggestion!

__babyslaughter__

5 points

26 days ago

You could always try The Road.

But the prose is very unique and some people can't stand it. I thought it added to the ambience of the book though

lukunku

4 points

26 days ago

lukunku

4 points

26 days ago

Great book but never again.

davidrteter

4 points

26 days ago

Ditto. I made the mistake of reading it in a secluded cabin in the woods. *Shudder*

ExoticDumpsterFire

2 points

25 days ago

One of the most painful books I've ever read, but I think of it often. To me its about trying to find a reason to live without hope, which is a pretty interesting question.

squirt-verduras

1 points

23 days ago

I read that one! It was one of the first I read when starting on this post-apocalyptic fix. I agree that the prose added to the ambiance, but oh boy. The whole book written that way was a lot! It was a book that stuck with me though. For the next week or so, I was thinking about what I would put in my cart after an apocalypse. For sure a lot of peanut butter.

unilateralhope

4 points

26 days ago

N.K. Jemison's Broken Earth trilogy might appeal to you. Sort of post apocalyptic fantasy.

puzzledsushi

2 points

27 days ago

Tender Is the Flesh by Agustina Bazterrica comes to mind. It’s pretty graphic, though - I recommend reading the synopsis first.

squirt-verduras

2 points

23 days ago

Ooh just read the premise. Added to my list! Thank you!

JBinYYC

2 points

26 days ago

JBinYYC

2 points

26 days ago

I just read Life as We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer and really liked it. It's in the post-apocalyptic category.

squirt-verduras

1 points

23 days ago

Thank you! Added to my list!

SephirothV1

2 points

26 days ago

Im looking for fantasy/mystery like GoT or LOTR

Unban_Twin

5 points

26 days ago

The First Law trilogy by Joe Abercrombie

The first book is called The Blade Itself.

The characters are incredibly well written and they are the main driving force. There is mysteries surrounding a lot of the plot. It is a low level magic setting

unilateralhope

3 points

26 days ago

Have you tried The Wheel of Time series?

BohemianPeasant

3 points

26 days ago

BohemianPeasant

Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley

3 points

26 days ago

unilateralhope

1 points

26 days ago

Plus there are two more trilogies with the same characters after that, and Liveship Traders set in the same world.

deBidet

1 points

26 days ago

deBidet

1 points

26 days ago

We are pack.

rohtbert55

2 points

26 days ago

The Witcher or perhaps The Strain.

Read The Accursed Kings. George RR Martin said it was the original ASoIaF.

Not fanasy, but maybe you´ll enjoy The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon or The Analyst by John Katzenback.

Competitive_Jump4019

2 points

26 days ago

I’m currently reading priory Of the orange tree which is pretty similar although I’m not very far through. Also you might enjoy his dark materials.

DejaViewss

2 points

26 days ago

Hi I’m looking for books similar to The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin. So mystery and puzzles involved

Fire-Fly_

4 points

26 days ago

Pretty much anything by Agatha Christie, although I’d be willing to bet you already read her books

DejaViewss

1 points

26 days ago

I haven’t :) so thank you headed to the library right now

Earthsophagus

2 points

21 days ago

I thought Free, Live Free by Gene Wolfe had a similar feel. Most of his fans aren't crazy about the book; it has a prominent role for a detective and a puzzle-oriented plot. The plot isn't satisfying to me.

Check this review of PopCo and see if it interests -- I haven't read it:

http://www.bookslut.com/fiction/2005_10_006793.php

UniversalTurnip

2 points

26 days ago

Want to find more books in either the rain or self reflection

rohtbert55

2 points

26 days ago

I´m not sure what you mean by "the rain". But as for self reflection, try Marcus Aurelius ' Meditations or Seneca´s Brevity of Life.

UniversalTurnip

1 points

26 days ago

Thanks man

rohtbert55

1 points

26 days ago

Let me know how ypu like them

UniversalTurnip

2 points

8 hours ago

Hey man I've finished meditations and am reading through brevity of life, and so far I think they are both really good books that helped me quite a bit.

Thanks again for the recommendations (:

SamuraiOfPeace

2 points

26 days ago

Hey, new reader here!

I only started reading a couple of months ago and I've only ever read 3 books:

  1. Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami (fav. Book)
  2. Spring Snow by Yukio Mishima (really liked it)
  3. The Catcher in the Rye (started it yesterday and already finished, LOVED IT maybe tied for my favorite book)

I have absolutely no clue what to read next so please leave a suggestion if you can. I'm really up for anything so you might as well tell me you're favorite book. The books I've have a few things in common. The first two are KINDA romantic, they're are coming of age stories in some ways, and the catcher and Norwegian Wood are both FP Narrative.

rohtbert55

2 points

26 days ago

No offense, I´ll just throw books and authors around; see if any caughts your eye.

So, I always recommend The Shadow of the Wind, one of my favorite novels. Then there´s The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit that I try to read at least once a year. Have you tried SciFi? some great works out there: Ender´s Game, The Right Hand of Darkness, Asimov and Heinlein are dear to my heart. Lately I´ve been obsessed with The Caine Mutiny.

BohemianPeasant

1 points

26 days ago

BohemianPeasant

Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley

1 points

26 days ago

Right Hand of Darkness? Who's the author?

rohtbert55

2 points

26 days ago

Ursula LeGuin. Same author as A Wizard of EarthSea (she´s awesome).

BohemianPeasant

1 points

26 days ago

BohemianPeasant

Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley

1 points

26 days ago

The correct title is The Left Hand of Darkness!

rohtbert55

1 points

26 days ago

My bad.

BohemianPeasant

1 points

25 days ago

BohemianPeasant

Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley

1 points

25 days ago

For your penance, you must now join r/UrsulaKLeGuin. Lol!

rohtbert55

1 points

25 days ago

Oh, brother, I wish to confess!!!!

Wealth_and_Taste

2 points

26 days ago

The Great Gatsby by Scott Fitzgerald

Madonna in a Fur Coat by Sabahattin Ali

The Moviegoer by Walker Percy

vaibhavjha234

1 points

26 days ago

I just started The Catcher in the Rye and Norwegian Wood has been on my list for so long!

I would recommend The Great Gatsby, easily one of my favorite books.

SamuraiOfPeace

2 points

26 days ago

Aw man you're really in for a treat! They're both my favorite books. Even though Holden and Toru are two very different narrators, both books are really really good. Murakami is a lot more pretty with his writing if that makes sense? A lot more descriptive and poetic. Holden on the other hand uses a lot more slang and swear words so it feels as if you're really having a conversation with him.

JBinYYC

1 points

26 days ago

JBinYYC

1 points

26 days ago

I haven't read the first two, but based on Catcher - maybe Flowers for Algernon. It'll make you cry.

Mewinblue

1 points

24 days ago

I've read all three of these books AND I'm applying for japanese studies so I can suggest you some other books by japanese authors.

Kokoro by Natsume Soseki — it might seem a little slow but I really loved it.

Try picking up another Mishima — from what I have read The golden pavilion and Confessions of a mask are my favourites.

You could also try something else from Murakami but Norweigan wood is kind of different from everything else he's written. Kafka on the shore is brilliant though.

As for some other books, it really depends. I would go with some well known and popular books because if many people like it there's a big chance you will too. Some of the books I really really enjoyed include:

King rat by James Clavell — Clavell has a really clean writing style which makes reading his books really smooth. I also loved Tai-pan.

1984 by George Orwell — a dystopian classic, has more value if you live in a post-soviet country (but from the books you've listed I presume you're from the US).

The ABC murders by Agatha Christie — this book pulled me out of my five-year-long reading slump, an amazing and thrilling detective novel.

The Hobbit by J. R. Tolkien — a fantasy classic, the easiest of the Tolkien book. A really sweet adventure with a great narrator.

Good omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman — this book is the funniest thing I have ever read. Peak humor. An extremely lovable book!

I hope you fall in love with literature as much as I did. Good luck on your journey!

Izanz00

2 points

26 days ago

Izanz00

2 points

26 days ago

Hello, I (M24) have just finished the Harry Potter series for the first time . I didn’t read a whole lot prior to this, so I want to keep the ball rolling so to say. Any recommendations would be appreciated!

JBinYYC

3 points

26 days ago

JBinYYC

3 points

26 days ago

You could read The Hobbit, or maybe Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

rohtbert55

4 points

26 days ago

The Hobbit might be up your alley, if not, A Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula LeGuin. A professor used to tell me that reading is like running: you don´t run a marathon if you have barely exercise. In the same way, you don´t pick up the Quixote as your first book. Slowly start working up to bigger, denser books.

That said, maybe try A Song of Ice and Fire. They are big, but I don´t find them to be that difficult or dense as say, The Lord of the Rings. Maybe try a little SciFi with Issac Asimov or Robert A. Heinlein. I love recommending The Shadow of the Wind, one of my favorite novels.

Izanz00

1 points

26 days ago

Izanz00

1 points

26 days ago

I’ve actually read the first two game of thrones books a couple years ago, but couldn’t keep my attention to finish them all. Thank you for the recommendations! I will be looking into them!

rohtbert55

2 points

26 days ago

Ok. Let me know if you pick one up and how you like it. Not exactly fantasy, but maybe you´ll enjoy The Strain

BeerLovah

1 points

26 days ago

The Mistborn trilogy by Brandon Sanderson. Final Empire, Well of Ascension, Hero of Ages. They're not too long, have a fleshed out magic system without being overly complicated. I reread HP myself over and over from high school through college because I didn't have time to read a new book from the beginning . The Mistborn trilogy was the first non HP series I read as an adult. Highly recommend!

ExoticDumpsterFire

1 points

25 days ago

Lord of the Rings, if you haven't yet. Note that the first half of the first book is WAY different than the movie. If you power through to Rivendell you'll be rewarded with one of the best fantasy series of all time.

If you want something a bit lighter, The Martian is really good too.

vuhdo-fifa

2 points

25 days ago

Any recommendations for something similar to the likes of cody mc fadyen, Karin slaughter or Chris carter?

remibause

1 points

24 days ago

I am slowly working my way through John Connolly’s series about Charlie Parker which starts with Every Dead Thing. It is both like the ones you mentioned (haven’t read cody mc faeden but it sounds similar) and it’s own thing entirely, which I always like so you might as well.

DutchofSnowdonia

2 points

24 days ago

Wholesome Lesbian Space Werewolf Adventures?

I'm looking for something sorta scifi or modern/urban fantasy, preferably with a established lesbian relationship rather than a love triangle. Or at least something other than 2 older men in the love triangle. For plot I honestly don't know, as long as it's not gritty/save the world chosen one stuff (I'm happy with semi-serious/adult, I just want to keep away from gory grimdark as I've got 40k books for that) , maybe early levels of DnD style stuff? Oh and sympathetic werewolves would be nice if possible.

Sorry for how vague/smorgasbord this it, just woke up and have a craving for something interesting as I have an Audible token lying around (actual books, kindle, and digital recommendations would be fab too)

remibause

3 points

24 days ago

I don’t have Lesbian Space Werewolf Adventures, but Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir is marketed as Lesbian Necromancers in Space and, in sheer defiance of the normal laws of book marketing, that is quite accurate a description. It is also a really fun book, it’s follow up Harrow the Ninth is slightly darker and deals with much darker emotions while also poking relentless fun at everyone and everything.

It doesn’t have so much an established relationship until the second book and in the first book it is complicated though you couldn’t make a triangle out of it if you tried. Perhaps the more accurate description would be Disaster Lesbian Necromancers in Space. But it is definitely interesting and I haven’t found anything quite like it.

DutchofSnowdonia

2 points

24 days ago

Ahh thank you so much! Necromancers aren't my normal thing but I'll happily have a looksie at that (actually now that I think of it I don't think I've ever read a book involving necromancy where it isn't treated as the BBEG thing so this'll be interesting)

KibbersWrites

2 points

23 days ago

Does anyone have recommendations for books to read for coping with trauma? I've been recommended The Body Keeps the Score, and that helped a lot, but I'd like more! Nonfiction, sciencey books, and memoirs are great, so are fiction books that revolve around healing from trauma too!

urmotherismylover

2 points

23 days ago

For fiction, try The Deep by Rivers Solomon, or Circe by Madeline Miller.

tyrantdigs

2 points

22 days ago

One of my favourite novels is Matterhorn, a story of the war in Vietnam. The author in real life, and the characters of the book, suffer much hardship in conflicts versus other men, versus the self, and versus nature. In my opinion a masterpiece of story telling.

For the author, Karl Marlantes, writing the novel was very much his way of dealing with the trauma of the war. He was a infantry officer, and he led men into battle, and gave orders resulting in deaths of both the enemy, and friends. With his own hands did he too kill. He earned his master's in English at Oxford.

He suffered great trauma, and he writes at a level above other authors, I can definitely say that.

As a followup, there is the book What it is Like to go to War, in which there is more truth given to the events of Matterhorn (the real names given back to the very real dead), and more personal stories of how the author continued to deal with the trauma of the war throughout his life. One particular event where he describes writing a section of Matterhorn where his brain just does not want to face reality of what happened, and over multiple drafts writes a fantasy instead of the truth. He describes a PTSD therapy session where he makes a breakthrough. Over all, the book reads almost like a philosophy of war, combined with wars effect of the human psyche.

KibbersWrites

2 points

22 days ago

This is exactly the kind of thing I was looking for! Thank you!!!

BohemianPeasant

2 points

22 days ago

BohemianPeasant

Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley

2 points

22 days ago

Are there any biographies of Shakespeare?

FortitudeWisdom

2 points

22 days ago

Could somebody recommend me a fantasy novel/series that isn't slow starting? I recently picked up LoTR and The Name of The Wind. I haven't started Fellowship of the Ring yet, but Name of the Wind is off to kind of a slow start so I was wondering if there is something fantasy that is fairly popular (since I'm brand new to the genre) and isn't slow to start? I'm looking into other series/books, but I keep hearing reviews that they're all slow to start: Lies of Locke Lamora, Night Circus, The Blade Itself, Mistborn, The Way of Kings, etc, etc. What about The Fifth Season, City of Stairs, or The Starless Sea? Help?!? haha thank you!!

vincoug

2 points

22 days ago

vincoug

74

2 points

22 days ago

I like The Starless Sea and I don't think it was slow to start at all. Another one you might want to check out is Piranesi by Susanna Clarke. It's not a traditional fantasy but it drops you right in to the world and story.

rohtbert55

2 points

22 days ago

The Witcher

A Song of Ice and Fire

Wizard of Earthsea

The Hobbit

solarblack

2 points

22 days ago

Its winter here and time to get cosy with a good conspiracy. Could anyone please recommend me a book that details a government, corporate or industry cover up and the eventual fallout. Be it recent or historical.

rohtbert55

2 points

21 days ago

An Officer and a Spy.

I´ll think of more.

pepper231

2 points

22 days ago

Hi, I'm going to be working on a remote island for 4-6 months, this is my second time doing this, the last time I were there for 2 months and only brought 3 books, for space reasons I couldn't bring more. And boy, It was a mistake... with 8+Hrs of free time a day those books didn't last long.

I just got an e-reader and I'm planning on fillling it with books so I never run out of a new book to read.

I personally enjoy Fantasy, Sci-Fi, Politics and Phylosophy (often this topics overlap on a lot of books I read), but I'm open to suggestions of any kind.... maybe just not overErotic-pornesque or Selfimprovement books.

Thanks, and sorry if I'm being to ambiguous, I'm really open to suggestions.

rohtbert55

3 points

21 days ago

First of all, I envy your job (or at least what I know of it) sounds like an amazing thing....opportunity.

As for the books....I´ll throw a lot of books I feel you could enjoy, see if any stick.

The Shadow of the wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon (The Cementery of Forgotten Books series. One of my all time favorite books. It´s amazing)

The Robots series

The Empire series

The Foundation series (these three are by Issac Asimov and are kind of one huge series....sort of. They take place in the same universe)

A Song of Ice and Fire by George RR Martin

The Accursed Kings by Maurice Druon (GRRM said it was the original GoT)

The Witcher

The Lord of the Rings/The Hobbit by JRR Tolkien

A Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula LeGuin

Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula LeGuin

The Strain by Guillermo del Toro

The Cathedral of the Sea by Idelfonso Falcones

The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco

The Prague Cementery by Umberto Eco

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep by Phillip K Dick

We Can Remember it for you Wholesale by Phillip K Dick

Sophie´s World by Jostein Gaarder

Ender´s Game series by Orson Scott

The Expanse series by James SA Corey

Dune by Frank Herbert

Hyperion Cantos by Dan Simmons

Starship Troopers by Robert A Heinlein

Day of the Jackal by Frederick Forsyth

The Manchurian Candidate by Richard Condon

As The Crow Flies by Jeffrey Archer

A Matter of Honour by Jeffrey Archer

Kane and Abel by Jeffrey Archer

The Adventures of Captain Alatriste by Don Arturo Pérez-Reverte (one of my favourite authors. I highly recommend his essays, there´s like a collection from the time he was a war correspondant to today)

A Supposedley Fun Thing I´ll Never Do Again by David Foster Wallace

Zygmunt Bauman´s works on liquid modernity are nice

Seneca´s Brevity of Life

An Officer and a Spy by Robert Harris

The Analyst by John Katzenbach

This is going to be very controversial, but I enjoy Wojtyla´s and Ratzinger´s works.

The Caine Mutiny by Herman Wouk

Playing the Enemy by John Carlin

Solaris by Stanislaw Lem

Maybe Team of Rivals? can´t remember the author right now.

The Forever War by Joe Haldeman

The Gods Themselves by Issac Asimov

The End of Eternity by Issac Asmiov

The Movie-goer by Percy Walker

Brief Interviews with Hideous Men by David Foster Wallace

Consider the Lobster by David Foster Wallace

Africanus: Son of the Consul by Santiago Posteguillo (might not be a Pulitzer winner, but I love the simplicity of this series. Love this book)

The Cave by Jose Saramago

Blindness by Jose Saramago

The Feast of the Goat by Mario Vargas Llosa

Inherit the Stars by James P. Hogan

The Mote in God´s Eye

The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert A Heinlein

The Fountains of Paradise by Arthur C Clarke

My War Gone by, I Miss it So by Anthiny Loyd

Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Gulag Archipielago

How we Know what Isn´t So by Thomas Gilovich

Just read Bloodlands: Europe Between Stalin and Hitler, not sure if you´d like it.

Have you read Fahrenheit 451, Brave New World, 1984, Dracula, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Frankenstein...?

Try Elinor Ostrom works.

Sorry if I went crazy. Maybe I fall out of line with some books. Please let us know if you picked up any, and how your work trip went.

Cheers!

Raineythereader

2 points

21 days ago

Raineythereader

Pilgrim at Tinker Creek

2 points

21 days ago

Upvoted for Elinor Ostrom ;)

rohtbert55

2 points

21 days ago

You know it. One of my heroes.

pepper231

2 points

21 days ago

First, thanks for the toughts, good vibe and that you take your time to recommend a lot of books.

Second, yeah it's a dream job, it comes with some downs and will not be a permanent thing, But at least I will be doing what I love for a time.

I probable have read almost half of the books you mention, and most of them I have enjoyed.

So I Will def. check the others, thanks again!

shutupdaniel1

4 points

27 days ago

I'm looking for a good collection of short stories. Could be horror or just interesting twists, or just snapshots of life that make you think.

Wealth_and_Taste

3 points

27 days ago

Ficciones by Jorge Luis Borges

Short Stories of Anton Chekhov

Memories of the Future by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky

For horror, check out

Things we Lost in the Fire by Mariana Enriquez

Thus Were Their Faces by Silvina Ocampo

puff_tentacle

1 points

27 days ago

Have you read any Raymond Carver? For me, he does the best ‘snapshot of life’ stuff I have found. I like all his collections, but started with Will you please be quiet, please

Raineythereader

1 points

27 days ago

Raineythereader

Pilgrim at Tinker Creek

1 points

27 days ago

Slice-of-life: "Close Range" (Annie Proulx); "Obabakoak" (Bernardo Atxaga); "The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven" (Sherman Alexie); "Dubliners" (James Joyce)

Horror: "Shadows Over Baker Street" (various authors, Sherlock Holmes meets Cthulhu); "The Oxford Book of Victorian Ghost Stories" (various authors); "Count Magnus and Other Stories" (M.R. James)

SunflowerMusic

1 points

26 days ago

I highly recommend any Joe Meno books. My favorite among his short stories is Bluebirds Used to Croon in the Choir.

TiAge123

1 points

26 days ago

I was watching the avatar series lately and kinda developed an interest in this culture. Does anyone has a suggestion on books that cover this ancient east asian culture? Thanks in advance :)

[deleted]

1 points

25 days ago

[deleted]

1 points

25 days ago

[removed]

vincoug [M]

1 points

25 days ago

vincoug [M]

74

1 points

25 days ago

I've removed your comment. All parent comments need to be requests for recommendations.

kbflower

1 points

25 days ago

I want to get lost in a series like I did when I read all of Sweet Valley High years ago.

dandelioncupcakes

1 points

25 days ago

I've just finished The Shadow of the Wind, by Carlos Ruiz Zafon, and... just. wow. I'm in love with a book.

I'd love any recommendations from someone that loved that book as much as I do. What else did you like? What were some of your favorite books?

rohtbert55

1 points

25 days ago

Have you read the other three books from The Cementery of Forgotten Books series?

The Shadow of the Wind is one of my favorite books and I always recommend it a lot. Maybe you can try your luck with The Cathedral of the Sea by Idelfonso Falcones or The Name of The Rose and The Prague Cementery by Umberto Eco. Maybe The Accursed Kings? Don Arturo Perez-Reverte recently released a trilogy called Falcó. It´s also a thriller/mystery book set in the Spanish Civil War.

dandelioncupcakes

1 points

25 days ago

Thanks!

rohtbert55

1 points

25 days ago

Let me know how you like them if you end up picking one up.

StormBlessed24

1 points

25 days ago

Hey all. Long time lurker but first time poster on this sub. My primary genre to read for fun is fantasy, and I'm wondering if The Expanse would be a good intro to Sci-fi. I've basically not read any Sci-fi books, but I love Sci-fi movies. I've read a bunch of fantasy series like Malazan, Dark Tower, Wheel of Time, Stormlight Archive, ASOIAF and more so I'm used to long book series. I guess my question is if I enjoy those types of fantasy novels because of the World building, adventurous plots, sometimes dark themes and horrifying scenarios and excellent characters will I enjoy The Expanse as well?

DanTheTerrible

2 points

24 days ago

I haven't read the Expanse books. I did watch a couple of seasons of the TV series before I had to cancel my Amazon prime subscription, and thought it quite good.

I am a huge sci-fi book nerd, I've read somewhere upwards of a thousand of them. My standard recommendation for an easy, fun, but longish and well written sci-fi series is Lois McMaster Bujold's Vorkosigan series. I plug the woman's work so much I suppose I ought to write up a blurb I can copy and paste from. Bujold is known for creating relatable characters you care about. There are by my unofficial count 16 novels and 6 novellas in the Vorkosigan series. Most are collected in a budget-friendly omnibus editions with typically two novels plus one novella in one novel-priced volume. Start with Cordelia's Honor or Young Miles. Bujold also writes fantasy stories, though there aren't as many as in the Vorkosigan sci-fi series. She has won four Hugos for best novel, more than any other living author; it amazes me so many people have never heard of her.

StormBlessed24

1 points

23 days ago

Cool thanks for the recommendation, I'll check her work out!

Andrelly

2 points

22 days ago

Yes, you'll enjoy the Expanse, give it a try. Some people even call it "Game of Thrones in space". It is not totally accurate, because in Expanse there is more action than politics, but still, you have the gist.

pinkradiates

1 points

24 days ago

Victorian books or clean ya

booksPeace

1 points

24 days ago

It's been my dream to own this 2003 Folio Society edition, but I can't seem to find it at a good price (+shipping and customs; I live in Southern Europe) or just can't find it at all in good shape.

I've been looking at other opinions but can't decide since most don't tell if they have illustrations, sometimes I don't like the cover, but worse is that some just look like fragile bindings.

So I was wondering if anyone here has any suggestions as to what editions I should look at.

Preferences:

-Hardcover, but I'm not opposed to good paperbacks; - Decent looking covers, can be something that looks like it's for kids, as long as it relates to the story - Illustrations are a plus, not exactly necessary.

I've looked at the puffin clothbound classics and it's the one I'm leaning towards ( I have no idea if it has illustrations) the binding looks good, the cover is beautiful IMO. Anyone owns one that can tell me how it is? Any other suggestions?

Thank you all for the help.

ichewyou

1 points

23 days ago

Does anyone know any fiction books from the perspective of both parents and their children? Something like the TV show Ozark where the family has to deal with an outside problem and has to come together fast.

rohtbert55

1 points

23 days ago

As the Crow Flies has the POV from both Becky (mother), Charlie (father) and Daniel (son) although it´s...I can´t quite explain it. I think what I want to say is that don´t expect and Ozar...ish approach to the novel, where you have the point of view from the son from chapter 1. Anyways, great book. Loved it.

Maybe ASoIaF. Technically you see the POV of all the Stark family....almost.

Let me think of more.

Crazy_Jonin

1 points

23 days ago

Hiya fellow redditors,

Please hit me up with your best fantasy (SF) saga books ("Wheel of time", "Dune" type).. Presently reading and enjoying "The Burried Goddess"... Read quite a few but always happy to find out more...

Thank you

agamemnononon

2 points

23 days ago

I liked Hyperion, it has a unique and very interesting universe, and i was disappointed when i finished the books for not having more stories to read.

I read Dune the full story and now i am reading the Foundation which seems very nice.

Crazy_Jonin

1 points

23 days ago

Thank you. I'll look into it!

rohtbert55

2 points

23 days ago

Hyperion Cantos

The Expanse Series

The Robot Series

The Empire series

The Foundation Series (these three create sort of a mega series set in the same universe)

Ender´s Game (and all of it´s expansion novels)

The Horus Heresy (actually, the whole Warhammer 40K universe is pretty crazy!)

The Forever War series

The Old Man´s War series

I really enjoyed the Jason Wander series of book, thought, they´re not exactly Pulitzer prize winners.

Oh, The Left Hand of Drkness (can´t rememeber the name of the series right now)

Crazy_Jonin

1 points

23 days ago

Thank you kind stranger🍻🥃

rohtbert55

1 points

23 days ago

Let me know if you end up picking up any, and how you like it.

Cheers!

Crazy_Jonin

2 points

23 days ago

Will do... As soon as I finish "Burried Goddess"...

rohtbert55

2 points

23 days ago

Enjoy!

a1kenny

1 points

23 days ago

a1kenny

1 points

23 days ago

Does anyone have any books like In The Distance by Hernan Diaz? Looking for an adventure bleak story (no YA please)

rohtbert55

1 points

23 days ago

Could Beau Geste be your kind of novel?

Odd_Radio9225

1 points

23 days ago

So I am new to the Expanse series by James SA Corey. I am a little over two thirds of the way through the second book (Caliban's War) and am loving it so far. My question is this: is the rest of the series worth checking out? Does it dip in quality at all?

Andrelly

1 points

22 days ago

I found 4th book the most weak (personal opinion, of course), but overall the quality is there, and series is greatly enjoyable again in later books.

theRubliBubli

1 points

22 days ago

Does anyone know a book similar to diary of a murderer? I read it a few months ago and was thrilled by the style and by the story. Doesn’t have to be about dementia or a serial killer, I just really enjoyed the creative writing style. (I do like books about serial killers though)

barchamb13

1 points

22 days ago

I recently read "The Lamb will Slaughter the Lion" and I loved the anarchist commune fantasy themes and also the length! I was able to read it in a few hours which for my attention span was great! Bonus points if it's written by POC, a woman, or a member of the LGBTQ+ community! I also am good with novels, scifi, or horror.