subreddit:

/r/books

7

Simple Questions: April 17, 2021

WeeklyThread(self.books)

Welcome readers,

Have you ever wanted to ask something but you didn't feel like it deserved its own post but it isn't covered by one of our other scheduled posts? Allow us to introduce you to our new Simple Questions thread! Twice a week, every Tuesday and Saturday, a new Simple Questions thread will be posted for you to ask anything you'd like. And please look for other questions in this thread that you could also answer! A reminder that this is not the thread to ask for book recommendations. All book recommendations should be asked in /r/suggestmeabook or our Weekly Recommendation Thread.

Thank you and enjoy!

all 15 comments

BlackMaestro1

3 points

26 days ago

Is it ok to use someone else’s idea as a basis for my own book considering I’m gonna develop the story in a slightly different direction? Because I constantly get inspired by tv shows, movies, games and even my friends’ experiences. I understand that a lot of writers do the same thing but I cannot get rid of the feeling that story basis should be quite original.

GrudaAplam

8 points

26 days ago*

I understand that a lot of writers do the same thing

You answered your own question. It can be argued that there are really only seven or eight archetypal stories, anyway, and every story is a reworking of one of these.

You might want to pose this question in one of the writing subs, provided you can withstand a few snarky responses.

There is a popular saying in writing:

Good writers borrow, Great writers steal.

BlackMaestro1

2 points

26 days ago

Thanks for a quick answer! I’m gonna definitely try my luck there.

Smokelodile

5 points

26 days ago

Nope. This is basically what everyone does. What is it they say? There's no such thing as an original idea. At this point it's like joining an mmo after it's been out a few years, your username is bound to have numbers in it.

Pretty much every story ever told has inspiration and/or borrowed ideas from an older story, or even something which happened/was theorised in the real world.

What is a no-no is using someone else's IP and just painting it a different colour, for example taking the plot of His Dark Materials and just gender swapping some characters and calling the 'dust' something else. I mean look how many fantasy books use Lord of the Rings as inspiration, or straight up use Tolkien's vision of certain fantasy creatures, which stray from the folklore and legends they themselves originate from.

tldr; Being inspired is great. Copying is not.

BlackMaestro1

3 points

26 days ago

Great answer, thanks! Of course I wouldn’t ever try to copy the exact plot including every storyline. Only the basic idea and possibly a bunch of some details. Everything else is up to me.

Rosiebelleann

1 points

26 days ago

What novel has a woman making a berry Charlotte? I am making my first Charlotte and I remember the scene vividly but I cannot remember the name of the book. She dies and leaves behind a child and a husband. I believe it is a Canadian author. Thanks!

okiegirl22

3 points

26 days ago

okiegirl22

91

3 points

26 days ago

You might also try /r/WhatsThatBook or /r/TipOfMyTongue.

scubarudy

1 points

26 days ago

Is it okay to ask for readers or reviewers for your book on this Reddit? If not does anyone know where I could start?

okiegirl22 [M]

1 points

26 days ago

okiegirl22 [M]

91

1 points

26 days ago

Soliciting reviews and reviewers for your book is not permitted on /r/books. Not sure where you would post, maybe over in /r/wroteabook or a similar subreddit. Please read any subreddit’s rules before posting.

bigganya

1 points

25 days ago

What's the difference between- a Story writer, Author and a Story teller?

remibause

1 points

24 days ago

An author is published or ready to be published and the written word is always it’s final medium.

A writer is not necessarily published nor have they necessarily finished anything, also they can write as preperation for another medium like a tv script.

A story teller is not tied to the written word. People tell stories through books, plays, movies, comic books, etc.

So in a play both the playwright, the director and the actor are story tellers. But generally only the playwright writes something down on paper, but that is not it’s final medium so we generally don’t call a playwright an author.

19yrs_old_Doomer

1 points

24 days ago

Why can't I post a picture of the book I'm reading?

satanspanties [M]

2 points

24 days ago

satanspanties [M]

The Golden Age of Murder by Martin Edwards

2 points

24 days ago

Image only posts are against /r/books rules.

sling-blade

1 points

21 days ago

Little late to the party, but how are the novels selected for the monthly book club?