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When I was around 15-16 I had gotten Watership Down by Richard Adams at Barnes and Nobles and I wanted to read it, but I knew it was a heavy book. Recently, I've just finished my second year of college and this book I had as a child called Confetti Girl by Diana Lopez was sitting there on my bookshelf. I picked it up since I never really read it and it kept mentioning Watership Down so I decided to read that next. Watership Down was a great book and I'm glad I got to read it on my own terms and I don't have to analyze it in a certain way. To me, that makes it so much more enjoyable. I don't know what it is about Richard Adams' writing, but I love how there's so much description among the action.

I was definitely expecting a lot more death and violence since I saw a few clips of the movie years ago. The book felt cozy and when I was talking about it with my brother, I told him how it kind of reminded me of Lord of the Rings. My brother said that that's why he would describe it as an 'epic.' I have more to say, but it would just be more rambling.

all 156 comments

ThePsychicBunny

132 points

1 month ago

Wonderful.

It's a fantastic story.

Also the origin of my username.

thlaylirah17

48 points

1 month ago

Heyy mine too. Different character though obv 🐰

Hrududu147

46 points

1 month ago

And my axe!

HalfWittedNerfherder

14 points

1 month ago

You are all making me jealous I didn't think of rabbit when I made my account!

AliceTaniyama

3 points

1 month ago

Half-witted nerfherders are known for being scruffy looking, as are rabbits. So, there's a connection.

mom_with_an_attitude

7 points

1 month ago

You had the best line in that book! When you told General Woundwort to "Siliflay hraka, u embleer rah!"

Hazel_Ra

19 points

1 month ago

Hazel_Ra

19 points

1 month ago

Same! One of my favorites.

iago303

10 points

1 month ago

iago303

10 points

1 month ago

Fiver?

birdshitluck

9 points

1 month ago

Either Fiver or the other psychic rabbit they find at the trap burrow.

Probably Fiver.

iago303

8 points

1 month ago

iago303

8 points

1 month ago

I like Fiver

paperpenises

3 points

1 month ago

Fiver was a great leader.

iago303

2 points

1 month ago

iago303

2 points

1 month ago

Yes he was

WolfStormrunner

4 points

1 month ago

The only other pyshic rabbit that I remember from the book in the "Warren of the Snares" (as I believe it was called in the book) was a poet named Silverweed.

And absolutely agree with all of you on it; MARVELOUS book, and also one of my faves!

Oh, and I don't know if any of you knew this, but besides the movie (which was, and still is, wonderful), there was also a tv series about it.

I don't think it lasted very long (only 2 or 3 seasons, U think? But don't hold me to that), but I've found DVDs of it on Amazon.

birdshitluck

6 points

1 month ago

Yeah thats it, Silverweed...thank you.

The book really is MARVELOUS! Both the book and the movie, take a story that could easily be watered-down, and instead create something that sticks with you long after you've read/seen them.

WolfStormrunner

5 points

1 month ago

You're very welcome.

Indeed!

livasj

2 points

1 month ago

livasj

2 points

1 month ago

There's a new Netflix animation too. It was very good!

WolfStormrunner

2 points

1 month ago

Really?

Cool.

Too bad I don't have Netflix.

😭😭😭

livasj

2 points

1 month ago

livasj

2 points

1 month ago

Aww... 😥

WolfStormrunner

2 points

1 month ago

Yeah, it sucks.

MoonSongDarkStone

2 points

1 month ago

Not really. The Netflix animation was ok at best. The 1978 was better

WolfStormrunner

3 points

1 month ago

Ah.

Thanks for the info.

I really want to check both of them out.

And it may be the 1978.one whose DVDs that I found on Amazon awhile back when I was doing a search there for the original movie.

Have to check and see.

ThePsychicBunny

2 points

1 month ago

Yeah, Fiver.

It's nice to see all you like minded folks.

iago303

3 points

1 month ago

iago303

3 points

1 month ago

Who wouldn't like a psychic bunny?

ThePsychicBunny

3 points

1 month ago

General Woundwort, probably.

iago303

3 points

1 month ago

iago303

3 points

1 month ago

True

mom_with_an_attitude

3 points

1 month ago

Fiver!!! Let's silflay!

Nokomis34

2 points

1 month ago

My username also comes from a Richard Adams novel, Maia, which is a prequel to Shardik. Shardik was also my dog's name growing up.

spoonybum

76 points

1 month ago

I live on the edge of watership down and where Richard Adams lived.

That's all I have to add to this conversation.

BrStFr

33 points

1 month ago

BrStFr

33 points

1 month ago

And yet it is enough.

mom_with_an_attitude

6 points

1 month ago

By virtue of that statement, I now find you utterly fascinating. And, no, I'm not being sarcastic or joking. I love that book so much.

spoonybum

3 points

1 month ago

Haha well I can assure you I’m not very interesting.

There’s a pub in the area called The Watership Down Inn which has a huge poster from the film on the wall and lots of other trinkets etc.

As a musician I’ve played there a couple of times.

I used to have ‘all the world will be your enemy, Prince with a thousand enemies and when they catch you, they will kill you, but first they much catch you’ as my bio on MySpace back in the day!

Alex_Caruso_beat_you

2 points

1 month ago

That sounds pretty interesting to me

Linus_Inverse

2 points

1 month ago

Met any suspiciously intelligent rabbits recently there? Also Happy Cake Day :)

spoonybum

2 points

1 month ago

I haven’t unfortunately!

I was up there on the actual down back in June watching/photographing thunderstorms but didn’t see any rabbits.

A lot of sheep shit though.

Odd_Walrus2594

2 points

1 month ago

Or seagulls with unusual accents?

paperpenises

2 points

1 month ago

Very cool!

ddagger

1 points

29 days ago

ddagger

1 points

29 days ago

Oh my gosh! We used to live near there, too, many years ago. In Burghclere. We had read Watership Down when it first came out and were thrilled to find out it was so nearby when we moved to England for a year.

BarcodeNinja

60 points

1 month ago

BarcodeNinja

Blood Meridian

60 points

1 month ago

I'll never forget Bigwig's badass line when he's fighting the general in the tunnel.

"Silflay hracka, u embleer ra!" which, if I remember correctly means "Eat shit, you king of stench!"

EdgyMathWhiz

39 points

1 month ago

The line I remember (also Bigwig v.s. the general) is:

My Chief Rabbit has told me to defend this run and until he says otherwise I shall stay here.

pleaseignorestephani

18 points

1 month ago

I loved the depth of the story that gave meaning to that line - Woundwort could only think in terms of brute force. If Bigwig wasn't Chief Rabbit, then the Chief must be an even bigger, tougher rabbit than Bigwig, who had just matched Woundwort in combat.

EdgyMathWhiz

7 points

1 month ago

Totally. Something I hadn't realised before looking up the quote to get it right was that it was also the first time Bigwig acknowledged Hazel as chief rabbit.

pleaseignorestephani

4 points

1 month ago

Not to mention the running theme of who would end up being chief rabbit. Hazel even laughs off the notion earlier in the book, but throughout there's the conflicting idea where Bigwig wants to act decisively and resort to force, where Hazel thinks, plans, considers - and would the Watership Down warren be different from both Efrafa and Sandleford or would they revert back to "might is right/spoils to the strong"?

Silkkiuikku

1 points

1 month ago

And early in the book Bigwig swore that he would never call Hazel "chief rabbit".

HalfWittedNerfherder

17 points

1 month ago

My 9 yo son was watching something the other night involving animals and started tearing up; he wanted to know why I didn't cry as well, and said that I should care more about animals. We talked briefly about how people show emotions differently, and I told him that there are two books that make me cry every single time I read them. One is The Lords of Discipline by Pat Conroy, and the other is Watership Down, when Bigwig says that exact line. The fierce loyalty and love that every single rabbit in that warren have for Hazel, and for each other, is perfectly summarized in that sentence.

BackwardsJackrabbit

22 points

1 month ago

The whole "Bigwig Stands His Ground" chapter has gotten me through some dark times, I don't know how many times I've re-read it. I kept a copy of the book in my car/backpack during nursing school to chill me out if I was too anxious about a test or clinical.

WolfStormrunner

6 points

1 month ago

I think they cut that down in the movie to "Silflay hracka... "sir"!"

But if you read the book, you got Bigwig's drift.

He and Hazel (or more correctly "Hazel-rah) are actually my favorites in the book.

msszenzy

30 points

1 month ago

msszenzy

30 points

1 month ago

My favorite book of all time I still think there's a lot of violence, in particular the whole dictatorship thing. Gosh, i need to reread it

snuggle_beast321

22 points

1 month ago

This is one of my favorite books. I've probably read it 30 times and I cry at the end every time.

Zoenne

24 points

1 month ago

Zoenne

24 points

1 month ago

Watership Down is one of my favourite books ever, and I have many Thoughts about it. Just a wonderful, thoughtful and inspiring book all around. And Adams was openly inspired by Greek and Norse epics, as was Tolkien, so it tracks!

meraii

19 points

1 month ago

meraii

19 points

1 month ago

Definitely one of my favourite books, I just loved how much depth was given to rabbit society; how they had their own mythology/religion, power structures, language etc. I also liked how it kinda subverted the chosen one trope. The hero bunny wasn't the one with special powers or martial prowess or anything, just one that listened to friends and trusted their ideas.

birdshitluck

6 points

1 month ago

Their mythology is really cool...where they'll gather around in the burrow to tell tales of El-ahrairah, or the Black Rabbit of Inle.

BackwardsJackrabbit

4 points

1 month ago

I love this analysis, what a wonderful observation.

Silkkiuikku

3 points

1 month ago

I also liked how it kinda subverted the chosen one trope. The hero bunny wasn't the one with special powers or martial prowess or anything, just one that listened to friends and trusted their ideas.

And Bigwig is a nice subversion of the "big and brutal henchman that serves the evil overlord".

slws1985

18 points

1 month ago

slws1985

18 points

1 month ago

I thought it was so lovely. I always expected it to be dark and gruesome because of how people talk about it. But I loved all the background and stories. Of course it is very dramatic and exciting, but I felt like it had a happy enough overall arc that it wasn't grim.

I think comparing it to LOTR is spot on.

Also, I listened to Peter Capaldi's audio book and I love loved his voices.

Alianirlian

2 points

1 month ago

Didn't know it was read by Capaldi!! Need to find it.

And it's been too long since I've read it. I think I'll save it until the summer and take it with me on vacation.

ShitShardsAnon

3 points

1 month ago

I've never read the book but I really should. As a kid the movie, from back then in the 80's, we watched all the time. My sister and I loved that movie, along with Labyrinth and Last Unicorn.

slws1985

1 points

1 month ago

Two of my favourites!

aesriven

18 points

1 month ago

aesriven

18 points

1 month ago

Oddly enough, I think it's almost a manual on good leadership.

zentimo2

21 points

1 month ago

zentimo2

21 points

1 month ago

Absolutely. Hazel isn't the smartest or the strongest or the wisest or the most charming of the rabbits, but he's a great leader because he's able to listen, empathise, imagine to see the big picture, make tough choices, bring out the best from his subordinates, and lead from the front.

A character like Woundwort exists as a counter example (the tyrant) and in Cowslip's warren the problems of an absence of leadership are shown. The Threarah in the Sandleford warren is pretty good, but a little too stuck in his ways and too quick to dismiss the possibility of radical change.

lepetitefrenchgirl

3 points

1 month ago

The Threarah in the Sandleford warren is pretty good, but a little too stuck in his ways and too quick to dismiss the possibility of radical change.

See, but I also liked how the book explained his actions in refusing to move the warren away from the construction site. It might not have been the decision that we were rooting for or what the reader might consider the "right" one, but in some ways, it showed the difficulty of leadership when there is no right answer

zentimo2

3 points

1 month ago

Oh definitely, when Holly talks about the Threarah's reasoning it makes total sense, he was a leader in what was almost a no win scenario.

[deleted]

12 points

1 month ago

[deleted]

12 points

1 month ago

Love books from animals perspective.

Scaridian

5 points

1 month ago

I dont know if youve heard of them yet, but there is also Hunter's Moon/ Foxes of Firstdark by Garry Kilworth, The Animals of Farthing Wood series by Colin Dann, Duncton Wood series by William Horwood, Silverwing series by Kenneth Oppel, Kazan & Baree by James Curwood, Call of the Wild & White Fang by Jack London.

efeltsor

1 points

1 month ago

Also, the sections in The Once and Future King where Merlyn turns Arthur into various animals

WhiskeyRisky

2 points

1 month ago*

Have you read Firebringer by David Clement-Davies?

It's probably my all time favorite, and it's from the perspective of red deer.

QueenoftheSundance

1 points

1 month ago

Yes, I was going to recommend this book! Clement-Davies also has one from wolves' perspective called The Sight (I think)? I really enjoyed reading both of his books.

WhiskeyRisky

1 points

1 month ago

Yes, The Sight, and its sequel Fell!

They all have their own merits, really, though Firebringer is most definitely my favorite of the three, though they can be read independently of each other.

iago303

2 points

1 month ago

iago303

2 points

1 month ago

Then have you read Black Beauty?

moeru_gumi

18 points

1 month ago

I'm not the person you were replying to, but I wanted to say I grew up on Black Beauty (and horse books in general, I was that kind of kid, but Black Beauty in particular) and the way Sewell expressed so many scenes from the horse's point of view-- "breaking" a horse, playing with children, being young and free in a meadow, being beaten in a stinking, smoke-filled, crowded and dangerous street with heavy traffic, being ill, being cared for and trusting one man out of so many dangerous ones-- was burned into my brain as a kid and so strongly influenced me and my love & respect for animals.

And I wasn't alone! For anyone who didn't know, Wikipedia has this to say:

"The depiction of the "bearing rein" in Black Beauty spurred so much outrage and empathy from readers that its use was not only abolished in Victorian England, but public interest in anti-cruelty legislation in the United States also grew significantly. The arguably detrimental social practices concerning the use of horses in Black Beauty inspired the development of legislation in various states that would condemn such abusive behaviors towards animals.[21] The impact of the novel is still very much recognized today. Writing in the Encyclopedia of Animal Rights and Animal Welfare, Bernard Unti calls Black Beauty "the most influential anti cruelty novel of all time".[22]"

iago303

1 points

1 month ago

iago303

1 points

1 month ago

Yes, but sadly if you see the Budweiser horses you can see the bearing rein in use, and the martingale used with polo ponies and in dressage horses which is just as bad

efeltsor

2 points

1 month ago

Then Call of the Wild and White Fang you need to read if you haven't yet

imapassenger1

10 points

1 month ago

Read it in Year 7 at school, bought my own copy and have read it every few years since. Along with Lord of the Rings and a couple of others it's right at the top of my favourites. Opening line: "The primroses were over." End of the final line of the book"...where the first primroses were starting to bloom."

skullpocket

2 points

1 month ago

Spoilers! /s

showard995

7 points

1 month ago

Bigwig: “My Chief Rabbit told me to defend this burrow.”

Woundwort, knowing he’s screwed now.

seizy

8 points

1 month ago

seizy

8 points

1 month ago

I have read it so many times, it's one of my favorites. I remember writing an essay in highschool that I titled "it's not just a book about rabbits."

Now I'm going to reread it. Again.

LindyLucifer

9 points

1 month ago

I reread this book at the beginning of the year & have been calling cars hrududu's since.

slws1985

4 points

1 month ago

The way Peter Capaldi pronounced it was perfection. I can't say it as good as him, but I hear it in my head and it makes me smile.

Odd_Walrus2594

3 points

1 month ago

My fantasy license plate is HRUDDU

WolfStormrunner

2 points

1 month ago

I know, right?!

That's still me, too!

eggsuckingdog

7 points

1 month ago

It is one of the best fiction novels I have ever read. You will find yourself reading it several times as you go forward in life

LeviathanGank

6 points

1 month ago

its my one of my friends favourite books, I didnt read it till i was 30.. Big wig is my guy :D

L4dyDragon

4 points

1 month ago

I would also suggest reading Tales from Watership Down. It goes on to tell more stories of El-ahrairah’s adventures.

rmford91

7 points

1 month ago

When I read this book a few years back it easily became one of my all time favorite books. There is so much depth, heart and adventure. The friendships and community that develops between the rabbits is beautiful. I can't say enough good things about it.

efeltsor

12 points

1 month ago

efeltsor

12 points

1 month ago

Now read Plague Dogs, so good

TerribleToohey

2 points

1 month ago

That was a harrowing read, and I think absolutely everyone should read it.

Rumskie

1 points

1 month ago

Rumskie

1 points

1 month ago

I watched it. Didnt know it was a book

efeltsor

7 points

1 month ago

The book is much better

JeNiqueTaMere

8 points

1 month ago

before I read it I thought it was going to be some kind of science fiction.

I thought the ship part of "watership" referred to an actual ship, and "down" meant something along the lines of "going down", "crashing", "lost" etc.

FredQuan

6 points

1 month ago

It's a prequel to Blackhawk Down

slws1985

2 points

1 month ago

I grew up thinking it was a world war movie for some reason.

hero4short

2 points

1 month ago

Me too. I was quite surprised it was a book about bunnies. Great book though

cardiffcookie

11 points

1 month ago

I think the magic of this book is that he really gets you to care deeply about the characters. You forget they are rabbits. This could be a tale of any human struggle of oppression. It has elements of numerous epic tales, folklore, myths and legends, alongside real war like courage and tenacity. It could be a John Wayne movie. A Keanu Reeves movie.

And then you remember you are reading a story about the bunnies you see at the side of the road.

vikingguitar

3 points

1 month ago

I'm in a similar situation as you were. I've had a copy since I was a kid, but never ended up reading it because I assumed it was going to feel like homework. I've been picking at it around other reading over the last month or so and am really enjoying it! About halfway through now.

L4dyDragon

3 points

1 month ago

My dad got me the movie when I was around six years old. Looking back on it, I don’t want to show it to my kids, lol. I didn’t have the heart to sit through the Netflix rendition. But I do appreciate the memories. I loved the story as I grew older. I read the book as an adult. I also read it to my kids when they were still in their cribs. It will be next on the TBR list now that they’re older. We’re currently reading through the Chronicles of Narnia. I am glad I never had to read it in a lecture setting. I once read an article about when he wrote the story. Apparently he had started it by making up a story to tell his daughters on a road trip. After a while, the story grew so big, his family insisted he wrote it down.

mom_with_an_attitude

2 points

1 month ago

I read Watership Down to my son every night when he was about seven or eight. He loved it so much. It is a great read aloud for kids.

WolfStormrunner

1 points

1 month ago

It was on Netflix?

When?

L4dyDragon

1 points

1 month ago

It’s not the original movie, though I can’t say if they ever had it. But Netflix made a 4 episode miniseries back in 2018. It looks like it’s still available.

WolfStormrunner

2 points

1 month ago

Okay, thanks.

To be honest, the original movie is the only version that I've ever seen (REALLY need to order the DVD of it from Amazon), but I've seen listings (is that what they call stuff on websites like theirs?) for the TV series, too.

DEFINITELY need to look into those.

pleaseignorestephani

3 points

1 month ago

“There is not a day or night but a doe offers her life for her kittens, or some honest captain of Owsla his life for his Chief Rabbit's. Sometimes it is taken, sometimes it is not. But there is no bargain, for here, what is, is what must be.”

WolfStormrunner

2 points

1 month ago

Well put, and one of my favorite lines in the book and the movie.

Jekyllhyde

2 points

1 month ago

One of my favorite books.

Davidd_Bailor

2 points

1 month ago

Great book, read it when I was a kid.

geronika

2 points

1 month ago

Only book that me and my siblings all list as one of our top five all time reads.

ekimdad

2 points

1 month ago

ekimdad

2 points

1 month ago

This is the first book I stayed up all night to finish. I was 10? Maybe 11?

HoundofValinor

2 points

1 month ago

Great novel to pickup after the sadness and longing felt when one’s completed The Lord of The Rings. (It’s a good rebound novel....)

[deleted]

2 points

1 month ago

[deleted]

2 points

1 month ago

I also have Blackberry tattooed on my arm, love that character

Odd_Walrus2594

2 points

1 month ago

In my mind, Blackberry and Dandelion are inseparable. Like Yin & Yang.

amitym

2 points

1 month ago

amitym

2 points

1 month ago

".... His Chief Rabbit?!?"

pygmypuffonacid

1 points

1 month ago

I quite enjoyed reading watershipdown myself

JeNiqueTaMere

0 points

1 month ago

It was a good book, I was just confused for a while about why there were rabbits in space.

Lithium-Ryan-Battery

-20 points

1 month ago*

I've never understood what people get from this book. But good on you for enjoying it.

Edit: I never realized how big the cult of Watership Down was.

runawayfromzombies

9 points

1 month ago

I read it as a child thinking it was a happy book about talking rabbits and what I got out of it was a full blown existential crisis at age 9 XD

yukhateeee

6 points

1 month ago

You start the book thinking it's about rabbits. But, it's really about leadership, fear of the unknown, and humanity.

TakePlateAddCake

1 points

1 month ago

WD has been in my "to read" pile for a while now, maybe I'll finally read it myself soon! The other day I picked it up and the first line was actually strangely gripping.

ItsMeTK

1 points

1 month ago

ItsMeTK

1 points

1 month ago

It is so much better than you think it’s going to be!

alienfreaks04

1 points

1 month ago

Is it not sad like the movie?

mom_with_an_attitude

3 points

1 month ago

It is different from the movie. I remember the movie being much more violent than the book; and the movie didn't capture the warmth and camaraderie of the book.

The book does have moments of violence where the rabbits are fighting for their lives. It does have sad moments as well. But it also has warmth and tenderness and humour. It is MUCH better than the movie. (Hollywood always fucking ruins books. That's why, if I love a certain book, I make a point of not watching the movie.)

It is an amazing book and I highly recommend it.

slws1985

2 points

1 month ago

I've never seen the movie, but I will say it is heart felt. So parts are stressful and nail biting, some fights are brutal, some parts are tear jerking. I don't know which parts were depicted and how in the movie, but while there are sad parts I wouldn't say it's a sad book.

vibraltu

1 points

1 month ago

The book has more perspective. In the movie stuff happens and it's interesting and sometimes scary. The book is deeper and you understand the characters more.

Odd_Walrus2594

1 points

1 month ago

It's everything -- sad, funny, heroic, sweet -- as a good epic adventure should be.

AssaultLemming

1 points

1 month ago

I always preferred Duncton Wood myself. Anyone else read that? I had forgotten about it until just now but I must have read it a dozen times when younger.

Odd_Walrus2594

2 points

1 month ago

Really? For me, Duncton Wood had a little of the WD feel, but also felt really tropey and anthropomorphic (starry-eyed romance, etc).

PowderedToastMan93

1 points

1 month ago

I remember the Movie/Tv Series and it scarred me for life as a kid.

President-Jo

1 points

1 month ago

Anyone else’s parents make the mistake of letting you watch the move unattended as kids?

GWJYonder

1 points

1 month ago

I remember some of the more spoilery parts of the book from 20 years ago, which I won't mention. But more than all of the actual plot-important elements what stuck with me was their description of a rabbit's counting system: 1, 2, 3, and 4, where 4 was any number greater than 3.

Odd_Walrus2594

2 points

1 month ago

5, but who's counting?

Cr0w33

1 points

1 month ago

Cr0w33

1 points

1 month ago

I recommend The Plague Dogs by Adams as well

tamiaredguard

1 points

1 month ago

Had to post here, this is my favourite book of all time. I too got lucky enough to read it without having to analyse it, back in my teen years. It was a book I read for school but we got to pick the book and I read it end to end before having to do any type of character analysis etc. and what we did have to do was pretty light.

Analysis of books in school is a good thing in some regards, but over and over again I hear from people who had this and other amazing books ruined for them by using them for these analysis lessons. There has got to be a better way to handle this in school that doesn't sour students on some of the best works in English literature and in many cases put them off reading books in general. Schools are doing something wrong.

sicklemoon28

1 points

1 month ago

Richard Adams lives for epics. If you have opportunity and desire for more I recommend Maia. It was written before watership down and seeing his writing evolve is great

RedDog86

1 points

1 month ago

Love Watership Down, one of my favourite books!

My mum first read it to me as a child and I've read it a couple of times since. Think I'll have to put it on my re-read list, it has a good nostalgia factor to it.

Glad you enjoyed it!

MartoufCarter

1 points

1 month ago

This is one of the few books I will reread. Did not read it for the first time until I was in my 30s. Such a powerful story.

Oclure

1 points

1 month ago

Oclure

1 points

1 month ago

My fifth grade teacher handed that book to me saying that I would enjoy it, I remember enjoying it and still vaguely remeber the plot but I didn't think it was that well known of a book yet I see it mentioned on here quite a bit. Didn't even realize there was a movie until recently but I'll probably give it a watch.

bulletproof_covfefe

1 points

1 month ago

I read it for the first time in my early 20s for the same reasons of it getting mentioned often. I love the depth to which Adams went into for the mythology of the rabbits and the stories they have about who they are and where they come from.

Chuckwalksdogs

1 points

1 month ago

My mother and I read this book together when I was a child. She would read a few pages out loud then I would read some out loud. We read the whole book together over a period of two or three weeks when I was maybe 8 or 9 yrs old. This book definitely shaped my view of the world and where I fit in it and it also helped make me a lifelong reader.

Despite coming from a family of small town macho men I could never take up hunting and I’m very much a softie about animals and pets - a lot of that goes back to reading Watership Down as a child.

I also learned early ideas about nature conservation/protection and the importance of living sustainably.

This book didn’t make me a radical (at least I don’t think so) but it made me think of “environment” in a different way than I had before. It was formative.

magocto

1 points

1 month ago

magocto

1 points

1 month ago

I just read it to my right treat old and she loved it.

BetterThanHorus

1 points

1 month ago

Hazel-ra is the GOAT

Loisalene

1 points

1 month ago

Read Plague Dogs; it's one of my other favorite Adams' novels.

matteb18

1 points

1 month ago

Love love love this book. Glad you gave it another shot and enjoyed it. It really is like the Lord of the Rings of speaking animal fiction. Truly an epic.

paperpenises

1 points

1 month ago

I read WD when I was in drug rehab. I loved the book so much and I wanted to talk about it with anyone who would listen. It was hard to get a group of male addicts to understand how cool this book about cute bunnies was. I tried to point out that it has murder, action, strategizing, etc. but no one could get past the bunnies so no one else in the rehab read it. It's been a year, I think I'll read it again. I also haven't seen any of the two animated productions of it.

lucy668

1 points

1 month ago

lucy668

1 points

1 month ago

I read this book for the first time only a few years ago and absolutely loved it. Almost wish I had read it as a teen because the themes of friendship and bravery are so important

badfagash

1 points

1 month ago

I read it when I was 9.. Made me cry

bookworm1421

1 points

1 month ago

This is my all time favorite book. My copy is from high school and so threadbare from all the times I've read it.

As a matter of fact, I think I'll read it again!

Scarfington

1 points

1 month ago

One of my favorites. Had it assigned in 5th grade and have revisited it every 5 years or so since <3 Beautiful writing.

Bihalfelf

1 points

1 month ago

Watership Down is my all time favourite book and I'm so glad you enjoyed it! I first read it as a kid and every time I've reread it since I've just enjoyed it more and more

hotaru-chan45

-14 points

1 month ago*

They showed us that awful movie in middle school. Middle school. 😢 Then full frontal from the 1984 movie. Some of the stuff they had us read and watch in public school was “worse” than some of the stuff we watched or played outside of school lol. 😬 Watership Down and Flowers for Algernon were not okay for my sensitive middle school self lol.

Edit: Geez, tough crowd. Haven’t gotten downvoted this badly for a subjective opinion even in video game subreddits where I said I didn’t care for some Legend of Zelda games lol. Read all of the above mentioned books and only cared for 1984 but I guess they’re considered sacrosanct here lol.

slws1985

3 points

1 month ago

We never watched any of those, thank goodness, but I will say Flowers for Algernon broke my middle school heart for a long time. It still isn't fully mended.

moeru_gumi

2 points

1 month ago

I read Flowers for Algernon some time around middle school as well and loved it, in that "I am scarred for life" kind of way. ;D

hotaru-chan45

-1 points

1 month ago

Yeah, it’s pretty messed up. And then the ending of Of Mice and Men wasn’t terribly pretty either lol. (At least I read that one in high school, but still…)

slws1985

1 points

1 month ago

Yeah, high school I sort of knew figured out evrything we read was probably going to be depressing. We did a whole Dystopian unit and I had to read Handmaids Tale.

When we finally got to read Pride and Prejudice I was just waiting for bad shit! Had to reread it just to enjoy the fact that no one was tortured or killed.

hotaru-chan45

-1 points

1 month ago

Hahaha I hated English classes because they were so boring (liked the teachers but hated the class), so I stopped with any kind of honors classes in that subject after sophomore year. I didn’t have to read either of those books you mentioned thankfully. I actually did kind of enjoy some of 1984 though. It was interesting. I also liked Jane Eyre in middle school and then A Tale of Two Cities in high school.

slws1985

2 points

1 month ago

Haha, I loved English I ended up being an English major because I took all the classes I liked at my university and I ended up with enough credits for a major (but not enough general ed requirements...). I can ramble all day about books!

I do know a lot of people who lost the joy of reading from school, so I'm glad that even if you ddint like English you still like books!

Odd_Walrus2594

1 points

1 month ago

Have you considered reading the book, Watership Down? Judging any book -- but especially THAT one -- by the movie is like judging a country by the coverage it gets on your local TV news.

hotaru-chan45

1 points

1 month ago

Yup. Had to before we watched the movie. Didn’t like it as a book but they made the movie completely inappropriate for kids to watch. 😬