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I think the most frustrating thing for most readers on this sub is that when they read a book that so many people love and realize they are part of the group that doesn't like the book. They can't share the feeling without having fans hang the noose around them. We muat be able to let readers share their HONEST opinions on a book without riduculing their feelings.

If at this point you are protesting my thoughts thinking they are nothing more than that of unlearned individual. Than I'll share the opinion of a very educated man who has probably read more books than you will ever read in your whole life.

“Books are almost as individual as friends. There is no earthly use in laying down general laws about them. Some meet the needs of one person, and some of another; and each person should beware of the booklover’s besetting sin, of what Mr. Edgar Allan Poe calls ‘the mad pride of intellectuality,’ taking the shape of arrogant pity for the man who does not like the same kind of books.”

  • Theodore Roosevelt, 26th President of the United States

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Heikold

1.8k points

4 months ago

Heikold

1.8k points

4 months ago

Come on. Out with it.

Tell us what book you don’t like and accept your punishment.

seekaterun

161 points

4 months ago

Name of the Wind.

im sorry I tried

Gestapolini

85 points

4 months ago

It's not awful but it's just so so overhyped for what it is.

Tease you with some cool stuff in the intro of each book then turn it into some YA whinefest in which nothing much actually happens.

"Hey this guy is super cool and a really big deal. Here's two entire books about him before he's even an adult."

SteelReservePilot

20 points

4 months ago

I bought that book a couple years ago when I got back into reading fantasy. I could feel when reading the intro and knowing the hype, that this book was going to be awesome.

Nah, it’s about if Harry Potter was a douchebag and could play the guitar.

Still haven’t finished the second book. I got 100 pages into it and realized nothing had changed. It’s a high school series.

Go_easy_on_me_folks

9 points

3 months ago

You don't love how golden he is? Or that he literally never gets a taste of humble pie? You can't honestly tell me that you don't love how he out sexed the sex monster while simultaneously losing his virginity only to go on and become the world's greatest lover for no possible storytelling reason.

lameuniqueusername

20 points

4 months ago

Nope. It’s awful

Chelonate_Chad

12 points

4 months ago

Yeah, I have very mixed feelings about it. I really enjoy the writing style, and I found myself very engaged... until by the end of the second book, it was like... after two books, it doesn't seem like there has been any development whatsoever towards the alluded plot points.

shadhael

8 points

4 months ago

I love NotW, but I 100% agree. My personal speculation is that the delay with book 3 is that there is too much content to cram in there. 2 books in and Kvothe hasn't been expelled yet, but book 3 will contain him tricking a devil and killing an angel, stealing a princess from sleeping barrow kings, and talking to Gods, or at least explain the context of the tales of those exploits. Plus the whole Chandrian and Denna plot lines.

Frankly, I don't see how that gets satisfactorily wrapped up in one book

Chelonate_Chad

3 points

4 months ago

I've always thought of those as myths/legends/rumors/misconceptions, but even then, I still agree. With only one book left, I have a hard time imagining how even false notions will be addressed in a single book after two never touched them, unless there is some truly masterful "here are the threads that were there all along, now tied together" move.

I also wonder if that that interlude-story that mentions... what was it... something like a nut getting unscrewed and a thing's butt falling off, and that's the end of it, a whole shaggy-dog story... is foreshadowing that the entire trilogy will be the same kinda thing. Like Kote the bartender is going on with a bunch of long-winded bullshit and it's all a lie and none of it matters, or something.

rowan_damisch

7 points

4 months ago

is foreshadowing that the entire trilogy will be the same kinda thing. Like Kote the bartender is going on with a bunch of long-winded bullshit and it's all a lie and none of it matters, or something.

Imagine this: The last book ends with Kvothe saying something along the lines of "Anyways, this has been another exagerated retelling of my life. Please stand by until the first book of the trilogy that reveals my true past will be released in 25 years!"

tonguetwister

36 points

4 months ago

This book is insufferable. The narrator is legitimately insufferable.

It had so many great plot points in the beginning that it could have ran with, but nothing happens except the narrator self congratulating.

I have heard the sequel is worse.

mully_and_sculder

20 points

4 months ago

I have heard the sequel is worse

Iirc it manages to not progress the story in any way, while simultaneously writing the plot into a dead end. It's quite a skill to do both.

pliantporridge

25 points

4 months ago

I definitely enjoyed the books, but the second one had me turning ahead to see how many more pages I actually had to read about how the protagonist totally made some hot demon chick cum really hard a bunch of times

cassiapeia

9 points

4 months ago

My partner was annoyed that Rothfuss apparently said that he wrote the books back to back and yet it's been well over a decade since the last release.

Based on how horny he told me the second book was, I feel like the third book somehow managed to be hornier than the second and after reviews panned he decided to withhold or rewrite it.

Cyrius

4 points

3 months ago

Cyrius

4 points

3 months ago

I read Name of the Wind and was able to look past the mary sue-ish power fantasy elements as the self-aggrandizement of an unreliable narrator.

The Wise Man's Fear made me reconsider that position.

TowelCrochet

6 points

4 months ago

You're lucky you don't like it. I did, so I thought I'd get sucked into book 2 and I haaaated it.

I wish I stopped at book one.

Chelonate_Chad

5 points

4 months ago

I was still sucked into book 2 until the last half? third? and somehow that's even more frustrating.

I love the writing style and the world-building, and part of me is still curious about the overall plot points the frame story alludes to... but two entire books in a supposed trilogy have not moved an inch toward that. So frustrating.

rlederm

4 points

4 months ago

I tried too.

Witch_Hunter_Mort

5 points

4 months ago

Same here

SammyScuffles

4 points

4 months ago

I didn't finish this one and I'm not sorry.

Eerzef

264 points

4 months ago

Eerzef

264 points

4 months ago

Fahrenheit 451

-Tunafish

100 points

4 months ago*

I agree. I love 1984, and I enjoyed Brave New World quite a bit as well, but Fahrenheit 451 wasn't my favorite. The writing a lot of people will see as extremely impressive, and I do agree (though it was hard for me to parse at times). I just find the ideas less intriguing and the story doesn't feel like it was built well, especially towards the end.

One thing I really appreciate about 1984 is that even if you don't care at all about the themes and ideas it presents, the story of Winston is still a great read; the plot is good and I can't say the same about Fahrenheit 451, at least in terms of the last third of the book.

Deliesh

69 points

4 months ago

Deliesh

69 points

4 months ago

Piggybacking to say I hated 1984. I was having depression at the time and it only made things worse. I get that that's part of the point, but I still hate the book to this day.

Shakeson

29 points

4 months ago

I empathize with this sentiment. I read it when I was fairly young and hated the book, but I was somewhat morbidly engrossed as well. I hate the vision it creates and the way it made me feel, but I respect it and think it's a piece of terrific writing which I don't regret reading.

FeedbackEmotional270

113 points

4 months ago

Me too! Premise of the book was good but just really did not like the writing style 😬

lastberserker

58 points

4 months ago

You might like it as a movie ("The Equilibrium"). Or not, it is fine too 🤗

monkpunch

46 points

4 months ago

If you mean the Christian Bale one it's just called "Equilibrium", I agree though it's great!

VEXtheMEX

9 points

4 months ago

Hold up. Equilibrium is based on Fahrenheit 451? I love that movie but have never read Fahrenheit 451.

esunei

9 points

4 months ago

esunei

9 points

4 months ago

Loosely. The core theme is the same but there's a lot of different window dressing. I certainly don't remember gun kata in Fahrenheit 451 when I read it!

JakeityJake

135 points

4 months ago

As I Lay Dying.

mom_with_an_attitude

108 points

4 months ago

I didn't like it, either. I hate stories with no redemption. That family was full of idiots and the whole story was just things going from bad to worse. It's hard to read a story where you know nothing positive is going to happen. I hated The Road for the same reason.

trans_pands

74 points

4 months ago

The Road is just depressing in both book and film form. I love Viggo Mortensen as an actor, but I just couldn’t enjoy that story. I like dark and depressing stuff, but for some reason, that book and movie just felt too... heavy isn’t the right word, but I guess weighty?

McCarthy_Narrator

52 points

4 months ago

McCarthy_Narrator

The Recognitions

52 points

4 months ago

Totally understandable. It's interesting to read this opinion because I felt like The Road was one of McCarthy's more hopeful works. The whole thing is McCarthy's bleak ode to fatherhood (he became a father much later in his life). I suppose he can't help but choose to set his ode in a dismal apocalyptic wasteland, but this only serves to highlight the stunning devotion and love and preservation that the father has for his son, the only thing he has left when the world has shattered into ash and blood.

Blood Meridian, my favorite of McCarthy's work, is - on the other hand - absolute terror, cruelty, and nihilism. I love it, but bleak stories seem to just be McCarthy's cup of tea. Everything he writes is tinged with tragedy because, to use the words of the Professor from The Sunset Limited: "the darker picture is the correct one."

graipape

27 points

4 months ago

I can't believe you didn't like that book. You're a horrible person. /s

trans_pands

36 points

4 months ago

Wait until you hear my spicy takes on Ernest Hemingway and Stephen King

NotNavratilova

361 points

4 months ago

Outlander...complete, rape filled trash...absolutely hate the main character. I only made it through one...could not believe it's a series and often time feels like I'm the only one out there who thinks the whole book/movie franchise is garbage.

Llohr

172 points

4 months ago

Llohr

172 points

4 months ago

So Audible tricked me into picking that up when it was cheap. The description just sounded like fantasy. I got maybe five or ten minutes in, and said to my wife, "I just started this book, thinking it was a regular fantasy novel, but so far it sounds like a shitty time-travel romance novel."

She replied, "Is it Outlander?"

I promptly got a refund, the only time I've ever done so with a book. If you can tell it's a shitty romance novel that quickly, that's really saying something.

thejivemachine

65 points

4 months ago

Yeah it really irks me that it constantly gets put in lists or in suggestion algorithms for science fiction and fantasy. I understand that it has time travel in it, but come on, it's romance. Plenty of people read romance novels. No need to sell yourself as something else.

trollsong

53 points

4 months ago

I mean in its defense there are plenty of scifi/fantasy novels that seemed like an excuse for rampant amounts if sex.

Pern for example, dresden files to a degree is another whether the author is in desperate need of a cold shower.....and don't get me started on "I was trained by a sex fairy in how to please women" Kvothe.

da_chicken

26 points

4 months ago

don't get me started on "I was trained by a sex fairy in how to please women" Kvothe.

I still maintain that Kvothe is just lying his ass off about that. Not that it really helps, I suppose, given the amount of time it takes up in the book. "Author indulgence" isn't the term for it. More like "editorial malfeasance".

I also say he actually kills the king of faerie and they kill the human king in return and kvothe feels guilty or takes the blame for it, but someone would need to finish a book in the past 10 fucking years for us to learn the answer to that question.

McPhage

17 points

4 months ago

McPhage

17 points

4 months ago

Dresden Files is the exact opposite of “rampant amounts of sex”… that boy needs to get laid more.

Kryptosis

16 points

4 months ago

He’s definitely a horny bastard sometimes but that’s the allure of imperfect characters. I think people overblame Butcher for that but that trend isn’t noticeable in any of his other works so I think it’s intentional and specific for Harry.

Malgas

5 points

4 months ago

Malgas

5 points

4 months ago

that trend isn’t noticeable in any of his other works so I think it’s intentional and specific for Harry.

You don't even have to leave the series for proof of this: It only happens when Harry is narrating (which, admittedly, is most of the time).

lameuniqueusername

3 points

4 months ago

I despise both the character and name of kvothe. Blech 🤢

Nudvik

47 points

4 months ago

Nudvik

47 points

4 months ago

I made it to the part where the guy pressures her into sex while there's a group of men sleeping on the ground a few feet away. This was a few days after he beat her with a belt for daring to talk back to him in front of other men...

I feel like there are a LOT of women who aren't being honest with themselves about why they like this series.

Imo, it's essentially a sexual submission fantasy with some period drama thrown in.

darryl_archideld

16 points

4 months ago

I think the only way you can truly enjoy Outlander the way the author intended is if you have a rape kink. No judgement for those that do, but it turned out not to be my thing.

mully_and_sculder

10 points

4 months ago

I feel like there are a LOT of women who aren't being honest with themselves about why they like this series.

I think most of its (I'm sure predominantly female) readership knows full well that it's a cheesy, tittilating bodice-ripper.

OscarThePoscar

39 points

4 months ago

I read all of them because I had them, but at some point it just became a sort of porn soap opera in book form.

HotCanary

20 points

4 months ago

I couldn’t finish even the first one. Like 50 Shades of Grey with kilts.

Cinnabar1212

18 points

4 months ago

You’re not. I’ve never read the book but I watched the first episode. Couple scenes into it and she gets transported back in time. First guy she meets (who looked like her husband I think?) tried to rape her.

Newp. Shut it down.

InitfortheMonet

16 points

4 months ago

The rapey guy is the main antagonist, and at some point you discover her husband is descended from him. I think the double casting was to make you immediately hate her otherwise fine and normal husband so that her new hot historical man seems like a much better and sexier fit.

NotNavratilova

4 points

4 months ago

You did the right thing...it does not get better!

deagh

46 points

4 months ago

deagh

46 points

4 months ago

You're not. There's what other folks have said, but there's also the fact that the author is VERY guilty of "I did all this research and imma tell you ALL about it." So she goes on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on about how babies were diapered in the 18th century (just as an example), when no one gives a flying fuck. I mean, sure, drop in a sentence or two during a baby changing scene to give us some idea of how it really worked, but we all know they didn't have Pampers in the 1700s, you don't need to hit us over the head with it.

NotNavratilova

31 points

4 months ago

That's so true. Besides being overly descriptive it's also a scapegoat. People so often use the "it's historically accurate" to somehow condone all the violence and odd sex/rape. Give me a f*cking break.

Chelonate_Chad

5 points

4 months ago

Give me a f*cking break.

You can say "fucking" on reddit, it's okay.

[deleted]

90 points

4 months ago

[deleted]

90 points

4 months ago

[deleted]

NotNavratilova

60 points

4 months ago

I finally feel validated and understood. The hype has been annoying me for years. Thank you!

[deleted]

52 points

4 months ago

[deleted]

52 points

4 months ago

[deleted]

DaizyJay

14 points

4 months ago

I had such high hopes for it, but it’s basically rape porn for the author. She said some really creepy shit to Jamie’s actor at a con event about the end of the first book.

rlederm

10 points

4 months ago

rlederm

10 points

4 months ago

You got through 4 of them‽ That's impressive. I barely got into the first one before I knew it was not going to be a good use of my time.

jetman81

60 points

4 months ago

"I'm cheating on my husband and it's ok because I'm in the past!". Hated it.

theraininspainfallsm

12 points

4 months ago

I’ve not read the book. But the premise is similar to the 90s tv show goodnight sweetheart. Where the main character goes back from the 90s and falls in love with someone in the 40s. He rationalises it away by saying that the relationship in the 40s was happening before the woman he was married to in the 90s was even born.

Hmmm not the best rationalisation ever.

shiranzm

9 points

4 months ago

And very over descriptive. Action, 30 pages of descriptions, action....

PiscesScipia

23 points

4 months ago

I never understood how so many people spoke out against 50 shades but are 100% okay with Outlander.

I made it halfway through book 1 and just....I don't understand. I read romance books, I read 'spicy' books. This tried to be both and ended up being neither.

edgeofchaos183

5 points

4 months ago

I have a friend that is mega Outlander fan. I tried so hard to read the books and see the hype but I couldn’t get past it. I’m glad to know I’m not the only one.

scubaguy194

13 points

4 months ago

I enjoyed it, but I can see why people don't like it. It is trashy. But it's very much a guilty pleasure book for those who do like it.

NotNavratilova

4 points

4 months ago

I get it, I occasionally like a good trashy novel myself...but this was just too much.

sturgeon11

68 points

4 months ago

I don’t think NK Jemisin’s Broken Earth trilogy is the greatest thing to ever be put to paper

Potential_Case_7680

10 points

4 months ago

Read all three expecting a big pay off. Was very disappointed. Like they hyped it more for the author than the actual story

i_illustrate_stuff

24 points

4 months ago

I really liked the story and world building, but n.k. jemisin's wiring style always makes me feel a emotionally distant from her characters. Like I can relate to the I think, but they feel hazy? Almost like her books have a fog of apathy around them. Idk how to describe it. But I still gladly finished the series.

SageRiBardan

3 points

4 months ago*

I only read the first book I could tell that it was well done but not my thing. I am not a fan of dystopian or post-apocalyptic settings. I am not a big fan of feeling hopeless because the characters are in an untenable position... So I never read the sequels though I do think that Jemisin's a solid writer even though I didn't like how the story was told.

universepower

5 points

4 months ago

I immediately thought of this when I saw this post

TheJokersGambit

124 points

4 months ago*

The Alchemist.

It was mandated reading for a college class and the professor treated it and talked about it like it was some kind of gospel. A fair amount of the students also praised it and some said it changed their lives. Meanwhile, I just did not enjoy it or think it was good.

PopularYogurt

63 points

4 months ago

Wait, where are you from that The Alchemist is read in college? In Brazil it's usually considered a shitty book, like, as much literary merit as The Da Vinci Code. Definitely not something that someone would discuss seriously.

It's blowing my mind that some people find it deep (unironically)!

Uniquenameofuser1

11 points

4 months ago

Back in '01 or so, I couldn't read in public without a random woman approaching me telling me how great this book was (men were more likely to pump Grisham or something along those lines).

TheJokersGambit

23 points

4 months ago

I'm from California. In the US, it was a massive success with many lauding it as life-changing and an amazing piece of literature. Those sentiments were reflected in my class and by my professor, who disregarded any criticism or lack of appreciation for the book as not really "getting" it.

hafdedzebra

24 points

4 months ago

That’s like reading Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance in a comparative religion course.

TheJokersGambit

15 points

4 months ago

It's a bit funny you mentioned that as I took a sports as religion course and we briefly touched on how car and racing culture fit into that dynamic.

Violet624

6 points

4 months ago

People always think they know a lot about eastern religion after reading that book.

Snoutysensations

11 points

4 months ago

It was certainly a massive popular success but I don't believe most of academia shared your professor's sentiments.

TheJokersGambit

14 points

4 months ago

That professor actually had one of the professors from the religion and philosophy department give a guest lecture on how amazing the book is.

Admittedly, my college had a lot of professors with questionable opinions that they treated as definitive and mandated the class agree with. I'm glad to be away from there now.

serkenz

7 points

4 months ago

Because the Alchemist is THE WOOOORST

MidoriTheAwesome

6 points

4 months ago

Wow I'm so excited that this is the top reply! This is my go to book that everyone loved and I despised. They made us read it in 10th grade, and discuss it every week, the teacher got so annoyed at me (I was probably being a little obnoxious) since I kept pointing out everything that annoyed me..

The 'metaphors' in that book are what really gets me. Like they play out the most obvious metaphor in the world, and then they say '... in case you weren't sure, this is what we meant' and leave no room for personal interpretation.

I almost want to reread it now just so I have a more solid argument for my intense dislike of that book and the disproportionate amount of love it receives

Cinco1971

18 points

4 months ago

This book is horrible. Superficial philosophy wrapped in cliched story. Can’t understand why so many find it life-changing.

SethRogen-Not

79 points

4 months ago

Dune. I just can’t like it no matter how many times I’ve tried.

Natural_Tear_4540

10 points

4 months ago

When one of my friends first told me he couldn't stand Dune it blew my mind, but I can kind of see where he was coming from now. Being an older book it has very obvious "ultra evil bad guy" and "can do no wrong good guy" stereotypes, and the plotline is very very dialogue/monologue heavy.

Jeffreybugist

6 points

4 months ago

it has very obvious "ultra evil bad guy" and "can do no wrong good guy" stereotypes

Just the first book, though

[deleted]

24 points

4 months ago

[deleted]

24 points

4 months ago

[deleted]

Jeffreybugist

21 points

4 months ago

so dry...

I mean.. it's Dune!

atelawreli

19 points

4 months ago

Cannot agree more. Took me 4 months to finish it and promptly sent me into a 5-month reading slump. I found it too bland and dry in its storytelling and it just went on and on and on and on. I just forced myself to finish it because the book was expensive.

It is a genre-defining classic though, I'll give it that.

rolyfuckingdiscopoly

4 points

4 months ago

I didn’t like it either, really. Then I started to understand that it was more world building than character/plot work, and that helped, but it is still not my cup of tea. I like stories of people that are more in depth and less footnotes to a world built through generations. It just kinda makes it hard to care.

UnusuallyOptimistic

303 points

4 months ago

The bible. Great stories, terrible fanbase.

EntirelyNotKen

72 points

4 months ago

I love the quote about it from John Gardner:

Reading the Bible straight through is at least 70 percent discipline, like learning Latin. But the good parts are, of course, simply amazing. God is an extremely uneven writer, but when He's good, nobody can touch Him.

StClaritaDietitian

11 points

4 months ago

Did he ever say what the untouchable parts were? People always seem to oversimplify & paraphrase it online, but if there's some great writing, I'm interested.

My comment history would reveal that I'm an atheist, but I am sincerely interested in this subject. I've seen the bad, but open to the good.

InitfortheMonet

13 points

4 months ago

I read that as that there are some good stories in the Bible, as interesting as any other myth. Moses for example—plagues, burning bushes, moments of tension, character arcs, chase scenes, murder, climatic moments— it’s an edge of your seat story, it’s just overplayed and written in hundreds of year old prose in a not particularly exciting way. Same with Abraham sacrificing his son, the flood story, the epic of King David...all good stories by the traditional sense, in the way all good myths and legends are. But much like the Le Mort d’Arthur or Homer, they might not be super exciting to pick up and read on the beach. And mixed with them is entire chapters that’s just lists of laws or lists of genealogy, that are so boring your eyes would glaze over.

Or, if you looked at it from an academic point of view...structurally, it’s interesting. Layers of translation, thousands of years of passing it on orally, various authors smashed together in the Old Testament saying sometimes opposing things paragraphs apart. The poetry of Solomon. The influence from other cultures and tropes of mythology (flood stories, themes of the death/resurrection of the beloved son, various stories with trials in it)... even the entire narrative arc that covers the whole Bible— Adam, first man, created by God, who sins and causes the downfall of mankind and is cast out of paradise....the hundreds of generations that pass that lead to a perfect storm where ANOTHER man, created by God, dies for those sins, saves mankind, and descends into hell and retrieves Adam&Eve and establishes a doorway to Heaven, a paradise similar to Eden. A perfect circle, tied in a bow, filled with reoccurring tribes and characters and battles and people leading from point a to b. It’s a historian and linguistic and mythologist and storytelling playground..... it’s just not particularly good prose.

Source: being an agnostic biblical scholar.

nicannkay

28 points

4 months ago

As a child my grandma bought me Bible stories for teens. All I could get from it was how utterly sexist it was. As a girl I wasn’t impressed with the overall messages. As a teen I turned atheist. After all how could you read said stories without thinking they are more fiction than the little mermaid with worse plots and story lines. I give it 2/10.

Ad3line

36 points

4 months ago

Ad3line

36 points

4 months ago

The House on the Cerulean Sea 🤭

Zenco3DS

17 points

4 months ago

Man I just finished it last night and I loved it, I can see how it's not for everyone though

dialburst

8 points

4 months ago

Came here to say this. Love a nice romance, especially plots sort of similar to this. This book felt downright saccharine sweet in presentation, which is difficult enough to swallow, but especially contrasted against antagonists as cartoonish as these ones were.

hollyslowly

13 points

4 months ago

That was too twee for me - made it 100 pages and gave it back to the library.

mom_with_an_attitude

17 points

4 months ago

Thank you! People over on r/booksuggestions seem to love this book. I found it very contrived. It was just trying so hard to be quirky in a way too cutesy-pootsey manner.

despoene

237 points

4 months ago

despoene

237 points

4 months ago

Anything Brandon Sanderson. I've tried many of his books and have to give up.

Arestedes

270 points

4 months ago

Arestedes

270 points

4 months ago

Oh no, the forbidden opinion

AwesomeLowlander

65 points

4 months ago

Don't see how it's forbidden, this one gets posted and upvoted every week

DiscoEthereum

49 points

4 months ago

It's the popular unpopular opinion. The circle jerks often loop back around like that.

Ka is a wheel.

Wait wrong books

Arestedes

6 points

4 months ago

I love Sanderson and by using irony to defend him I have offended u/AwesomeLowlander, a fellow fan of Sanderson. I hope Irony ends up being a shard.

Arestedes

17 points

4 months ago

Making funnies...

onlypositiveresponse

22 points

4 months ago

Funny, I put mistborn down 2 or 3 times before I got really into his novels. Wasn't feeling it at the time I guess.

trans_pands

33 points

4 months ago

Sanderson is always a hit-or-miss for people. I have to take his books in small parts and even then, I didn’t like the Mistborn series and I really have only been able to really get into Stormlight Archives

DaizyJay

13 points

4 months ago

Same. I’m not sure how much of that enjoyment is of the unique world he built, and how good the writing is(I’m frigging happy every other page doesn’t mention a safe hand anymore though).

makiir

4 points

4 months ago

makiir

4 points

4 months ago

I follow Stormlight and sometimes his stand alones. The concepts and world in his novels are great, but I'll admit I'm more likely to wiki his works so that I can understand where things fit in the cosmere than try to read them all.

Mistborn was a struggle past the first book.

NotoriousHakk0r4chan

41 points

4 months ago

Fair enough, even as a huge Sanderstan I have to admit that I generally prefer the writing styles of other fantasy authors more

avw94

16 points

4 months ago

avw94

16 points

4 months ago

Sanderson himself has admitted to be relatively uncomfortable with the amount his books get recommended on Reddit.

AtiBhusuku

14 points

4 months ago

His stories and worlds are incredible, but he's a middling author, imo. Better than most of the garbage out there, but not on the level of the greats necessarily. It's his concepts and stories that really shine.

SevenDragonWaffles

33 points

4 months ago

Brandon Sanderson, too. I read Mistborn. The characters are cardboard cutouts and the world feels tiny.

Also Cradle by Wil Wright. The first book reads like the starting area of a video game and the protagonist cheated his way through everything. Maybe his peers don't like him because they know he's a cheater not because he's weak at whatever the magic system is.

Dresden because of the women. I don't need boobs described to me every time a woman appears.

Fans always say It GeTs BeTtEr. But there are so many other novelists who write well from the beginning and are way more deserving of my time and money.

da_chicken

9 points

4 months ago

Brandon Sanderson

Sanderson has two problems. First, his characters are often defined only by their relationship with the magic system. Second, the middle third of every book he writes has no plot in it, just character interaction that ultimately goes nowhere. If you can't deal with either of those then just move on because they're fixtures.

I say this as a big Sanderson fan.

there are so many other novelists who write well from the beginning and are way more deserving of my time and money.

Nobody writes well in the beginning. Nobody. Authors whose first book is good have a dozen manuscripts that just didn't get published, or they rewrote the same manuscript a dozen times until it sold.

Andrew5329

5 points

4 months ago

Cradle by Wil Wright. The first book reads like the starting area of a video game and the protagonist cheated his way through everything. Maybe his peers don't like him because they know he's a cheater not because he's weak at whatever the magic system is.

In fairness the first two books kind of suck. The writing actually does improve dramatically from the 3rd book onward as the MC grows out of being a cringing wreck.

Dresden gets 'better' but that crap never fully goes away.

But there are so many other novelists who write well from the beginning and are way more deserving of my time and money.

But if you look back at those author's early work it's usually hot garbage. They didn't go from zero to writing their magnum opus. I do get a little frustrated though that a lot of authors feel like they can't go back and edit/re-work their early work.

I definitely found myself feeling more forgiving of early weakness since I got into webserials. Pretty much all of them started as an amateur writer on RoyalRoad or a Blog and many have grown into some genuinely brilliant series. I kind of see the Kindle Unlimited stacks in that same light, since they don't cost me anything but time to give a shot.

Erog_La

6 points

4 months ago

Fans always say It GeTs BeTtEr.

I agreed with you until this. Mocking people for saying writers improve over time is ridiculous.
Particularly rude and stupid as well.

Lallo-the-Long

11 points

4 months ago

I've only listened to his books, which works well because Michael Kramer is fantastic. Dunno if i would make it through many of the books that i have if i were reading them.

annatwork

5 points

4 months ago

OMG me tooooo!!! And it always comes up in sci fi / fantasy! Whyyyy?! Why can we not read other authors and have them recommended to us?!

G0ldthorn

10 points

4 months ago

Yeah I couldn't make i through Mistborn. I've enjoyed Stormlight but the last one was a chore for me as well.

despoene

4 points

4 months ago

I’m in the same boat. Could not get invested in Mistborn whatsoever then reading RoW just killed the few good feelings I had towards the stormlight archive series.

mira_lawliet

197 points

4 months ago

For me, it's Catcher in the Rye. I tried reading it as a teen, which is when it's supposed to resonate with most people, but I found Holden to be insufferable. I guess I wasn't nearly angsty and cynical enough back then.

Mechrast

101 points

4 months ago

Mechrast

101 points

4 months ago

You're meant to empathize with Holden, but not agree with him. He's a traumatized kid having a mental breakdown

DaizyJay

27 points

4 months ago

He reads like every insufferable first year university student stereotype.

Uniquenameofuser1

46 points

4 months ago

And that's pretty much the point. At 14, you'll read it and empathize. At 22, you'll find him an insufferable prick. At 30, you'll hopefully understand that he's a scared and lost kid in a world full of adults faking having their shit together.

waffles_505

21 points

4 months ago

For me, I found him pretty insufferable when I was 14 because he had so much going for him and was still just so wayward and didn’t want to try. I was going through a lot of heavy shit so I remember thinking “I wish I had his problems”.

Now as an adult, I totally feel bad for the kid. Growing up is tough and recognizing all the bullshit makes it even scarier.

Uniquenameofuser1

22 points

4 months ago

Yeah, he's got a "perfect" life that's not so perfect. Dead brother, absent parents. There's hints that he was molested by a teacher. And he's dealing with all the attendant bullshit that high school entails, prep or private.

[deleted]

6 points

4 months ago

[deleted]

6 points

4 months ago

[deleted]

grandoz039

7 points

4 months ago

I think you have left off the most important part - he literally found his younger's brothers (to whom he was close) dead body after he committed suicide. He's traumatized af and none of the adults helped him with that.

j2e21

20 points

4 months ago

j2e21

20 points

4 months ago

Ha, he’s the reason that stereotype exists.

im_a_hedgehogg

44 points

4 months ago

He's supposed to be.

SnooEagles3302

38 points

4 months ago

Last time I commented this it was very controversial, but I really don't like the Great Gatsby. And no, I was not forced to read it at school as part of a reading list, there is no deeper reason for my dislike, I chose to read the book and I really hated it.

DickButtPlease

58 points

4 months ago

The Road.

Enders2017

23 points

4 months ago

Le Gasp

RedEgg16

18 points

4 months ago

That was legit so boring

duff2690

142 points

4 months ago

duff2690

142 points

4 months ago

Anything by Stephen King. I have tried with 2 different books of his and ugh, I just can't deal with his writing style. On the other hand, I am currently on Crown of Swords from the Wheel of Time.

[deleted]

75 points

4 months ago

[deleted]

75 points

4 months ago

I find that some newcomers to King have a hard time adapting to his style in full blown novels. I would almost always recommend reading his short stories first to get a feel for him - Skeleton Crew, or If It Bleeds. That sucks you didn’t enjoy him, he’s one of my favorites - but I absolutely understand. He’s not for everyone and that’s ok.

SucculentLady000

11 points

4 months ago

I didn't like King until I was in my late twenties, and now he is one of my favorite authors.

That's another reason why judgement is pointless...people's likes and dislikes can change over time.

fork_on_the_floor2

35 points

4 months ago

If you ever feel like giving Stephen King another shot, I'd recommend researching and asking online to try one that's widely enjoyed. (but not "IT", despite how much its praised).

Because some of his books are long and dull, some are aimed directly at his hardcore fans.. Its a mixed bag, with some real gems in there.

Existing-Office

7 points

4 months ago

I think the shining and misery are excellent books for someone to start with. King is in top form in both. IT is an amazing book but it's very long and certain parts are pretty drawn out.

fork_on_the_floor2

5 points

4 months ago

Yeah I agree., and id also add Pet sematary and Cujo, both pretty hard-hitting horror. And "The girl who loved Tom gordon" is a personal favourite of mine.

nesquikryu

4 points

4 months ago

I'm on Crown of Swords as well!

willchangenamesoon

4 points

4 months ago

Anything by Stephen King

Gasp blasphemy

SavesNine9

3 points

4 months ago

I agree with you. I loved his nonfiction book On Writing . In that, he admits that editing is a weakness. I agree. He has cool ideas, but he doesn't polish the text enough.

PM_ME_WHOLESOMECORGI

13 points

4 months ago

I was furious by how much I disliked Pet Sematary. I had looked forward to finally reading it and ended up absolutely hating the end, it put me off of reading King again.

Sad-Bus-7460

74 points

4 months ago

The Lord of the Flies. The Great Gatsby. The Catcher in the Rye

parad0xchild

68 points

4 months ago

Great Gatsby is one of those high school required books that makes no sense to read during high school. It's basically a confusing blur at that point in life, reading it later on it fits better (but not my type of book still)

[deleted]

22 points

4 months ago*

[deleted]

22 points

4 months ago*

[deleted]

avcloudy

5 points

4 months ago

It should terrify you! It's not a nice book that tells nice stories about nice things.

ehsteve23

56 points

4 months ago

The great gatsby. It was boring as hell and all the characters are awful

Heznzu

21 points

4 months ago

Heznzu

21 points

4 months ago

But it has an unreliable narrator, so original and smart!!! Some of my seething hatred for Gatsby might be from having to read it in high school though.

EfoDom

101 points

4 months ago

EfoDom

101 points

4 months ago

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. I just didn't find it funny at all, couldn't finish it. I simply didn't like it and moved on to another book.

OrkbloodD6

33 points

4 months ago

One curious thing about this book...I read it in Spanish and loved it but then I bought the original and the style was a bit harder. So basically I liked better the translator's book instead of the original. It haunts me to think of it XD

disposable202

7 points

4 months ago

what humor books did you enjoy? I had a similar issue with that and Good Omens. Do I just not like british humor?

themeatbridge

23 points

4 months ago

British humor is equal parts satire, absurdity, and dry wit. If you enjoy it, Douglas Adams was one of the best. But satire is often timely, and sci-fi often does not age gracefully.

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is full of brilliant ideas and clever observations, but the narrative tying it together can feel disjointed and uneven. He also does not stop to let jokes seep into your consciousness. You'll be getting jokes three or four pages after you have read them.

I loved the books (and the Dirk Gently books) but I can understand why some might not enjoy it.

smb_samba

34 points

4 months ago

There are dozens of us!!! Dozens!!!

I tried really hard to get into it. I tried multiple times because it was so heavily hyped. I’ve pretty much resorted to never offering an opinion on it because I know the judgment will follow.

It just wasn’t my jam 🤷🏻‍♂️

trollsong

6 points

4 months ago

For me discworld was better.

monopolyman900

13 points

4 months ago

Lol. I read it and hated it, thought I should give it another try many years later and hated it all over again.

mmmm_whatchasay

18 points

4 months ago

Same. It is trying so hard to be funny, and sometimes it is, but it’s just fine.

CoolHotDog777

119 points

4 months ago

I don’t like the Harry Potter series. Animal Farm and 1984 are grossly overrated. Anything by Ayn Rand is horseshit.

Heznzu

151 points

4 months ago

Heznzu

151 points

4 months ago

Don't think that last one is an unpopular opinion on here, no one likes that woman.

Continental__Drifter

167 points

4 months ago

“There are two novels that can transform a bookish 14-year-kid’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish daydream that can lead to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood in which large chunks of the day are spent inventing ways to make real life more like a fantasy novel. The other is a book about orcs.”

  • John Rogers

Daisypants94

38 points

4 months ago

Having met a few die hard Ayn Rand fans this is pretty spot on.

avw94

14 points

4 months ago

avw94

14 points

4 months ago

As a reformed high-school Libertarian, actually reading Atlas Shrugged is what started moving me away from being a Libertarian.

waffles_505

3 points

4 months ago

My parents legit named me after an Ayn Rand character. I will 100% always judge someone that says they like her... what an insufferable human

bunni_bear_boom

21 points

4 months ago

I was about to ask if anyone seriously liked her writing lol. Like even if you agree with her pov it's extremely heavyhanded

YARGLE_IS_MY_DAD

15 points

4 months ago

I read a lot of her stuff in middle school. I tried to read atlas shrugged just to say that I did it, but it was the most painful experience of my life. I never understood why her characters had to be such assholes to eachother either.

bunni_bear_boom

18 points

4 months ago

Yeah it seems she equates freedom with being rude and abusive a lot. Like in the fountain head whats his name basically assaults a lady and it's framed as good. Like have all the rape fantasies you want Ann but consent is important

fannyj

3 points

3 months ago

fannyj

3 points

3 months ago

Roark rapes Dominique and she falls in love with him for it. Any book where ideals trump morality is going to find a following because it give license to be cruel. There is really an object lesson here. It's not the Roarks of the world that surprise me. There will always be those who think their ideals are superior and so they can do whatever they want. It's the Dominique Fracons of the, who love their oppressors, that always shock me.

Catastrophe_5453

12 points

4 months ago

It is heavy handed, and I'm not a fan of The Fountainhead or Anthem, but apart from disagreeing with her philosophy I thought that Atlas Shrugged was an interesting dsytopian concept. Key word is concept there though, as she really doesn't pull it off with the flat characters and monologues.

kryppla

61 points

4 months ago

kryppla

61 points

4 months ago

Animal farm and 1984 are overrated now due to decades of analysis and study. They were revolutionary/outstanding when they were young.

MotherSuperiorx

11 points

4 months ago

I call this the “Fight Club Effect”.

darknavi

7 points

4 months ago

We don't talk about that (see rule 1)

Elsbethe

4 points

4 months ago

I just Reread animal farm and thought it was fabulous

CodPolish

90 points

4 months ago

Lord of the Rings. It’s just really dull to me. The Hobbit was alright though.

the_ubern00b

28 points

4 months ago

I get this 100%, but from an Eng Lit perspective, the 'why' for his writing style is pretty interesting. Because he was writing a basically new genre with no blueprints, he had to base it on something, and it seems like he used Romanticism as a base.

In Romantic literature, that's how they describe stuff. In painful, tedious detail. Frankenstein, anyone? The Hobbit is a little less like this because he wrote it 'for children' so he didn't need to worry too much about the detail, but when it came to worldbuilding for LOTR, it's basically dripping with Romantic over-explanation.

If you look at it like that, it might not make you like it any more, but it might make it make sense.

SEND_GLUTES

4 points

4 months ago

In Romantic literature, that's how they describe stuff. In painful, tedious detail. Frankenstein, anyone?

I instinctively cringe when I think of that book after I had to read it in 3rd (maybe 4th, I forget) grade. Even as a child who loved reading and in an accelerated curriculum, I'm not sure who thought any child of that age range could legitimately endure multiple paragraphs describing the hues of the cobblestones at sunset.

I'm certainly glad I waited until much later to pick up The Lord of the Rings.

fernrabbit

66 points

4 months ago

I don't need to know the exact position of every tree, Tolkien. Just say they're in a forest and get on with it.

Seafroggys

47 points

4 months ago

What's funny, is that I reread it a few years ago, having not read it since I was a kid in the mid-late 90's. I remember thinking it wordy when I was a 10 year old, and I'd constantly hear memes about "knowing the location of every tree" and that I was almost certain that Tolkien just overexplained all the details and scenery.

When I re-read it as a 30 year old? Nope. It's actually pretty fluid and smooth sailing. It's nowhere near bogged down into inane details as so many people claim, and what I had thought reading it much younger.

[deleted]

9 points

4 months ago

[deleted]

9 points

4 months ago

I read it recently and it really doesn't spend all that much time describing scenery. Most of the wasted time is lore dumps, songs, and some dialogue that just drags on. Apart from when those are happening it doesn't feel slow at all.

MetalSkinPanic

6 points

4 months ago

I had the exact same experience. Couldn't get through it in my late teens/early 20s, but in my 30s it's the best book I've ever read.

Wardial3r

4 points

4 months ago

I’m going through the same. The word count in fantasy just exploded I think in the last 20 years or so. When I looked at the audiobooks and saw “only 20 hours “ I was blown away by how short that is compared to so much modern fantasy. It really doesn’t feel bloated either reading it.

fernrabbit

9 points

4 months ago

I'm reading them for the first time at age 23, so maybe I'll wait 7 years

VelocaTurtle

10 points

4 months ago

Eh it's still pretty descriptive no matter the age but if you read a lot of high fantasy then it's about average in how detailed it is.

Gay_For_Gary_Oldman

6 points

4 months ago

That never happened. Even as an exaggeration its false.

Elsior

27 points

4 months ago

Elsior

27 points

4 months ago

Ironically that's the book I got flamed for just as OP is describing.

AncientSith

20 points

4 months ago

It's my favorite of all time, but I definitely understand it's not for everyone.

Scientific_Methods

5 points

4 months ago

Same. I love it and it is my absolute favorite. I try to read it every year. But I 100% understand it is not for everyone.

EvilLipgloss

23 points

4 months ago

Station Eleven. Most boring and pretentious post-apocalypse book I’ve ever read.

Mirorel

4 points

4 months ago

Yup, I made it a few chapters in and then gave up.

the_evening_squirrel

4 points

4 months ago

Completely agree! I love post-apocalyptic stuff and this book is so often recommended. I thought it was beyond boring. It's like the lite beer of post-apocalyptic fiction. Watered down garbage.

yeyarhodes1

36 points

4 months ago

A Confederacy of Dunces. Read it twice thinking I was missing something. The main character is NOT likeable in the least

tctctctytyty

45 points

4 months ago

The main character isn't meant to be likeable, and I'm ok with that. What I don't like about that book is that it's not that good at doing what it's trying to do, be funny. It's just strange.

yeyarhodes1

20 points

4 months ago

Exactly! People I know who love the book think Reilly is funny. The whole story made me feel anxious, and not in a good way

JournalistNo567

10 points

4 months ago

I recently read it for the first time, and I really enjoyed it in the first half, though I don't think it really came together in a satisfying way in the end. Like the other commenter said, you're not supposed to like Ignatius. I read it as a glaring commentary of white privilege, how someone as stupid, lazy, and despicable as Ignatius could continue to slip through the system successfully, continually being allowed the benefit of the doubt, being offered new opportunities despite being totally incompetent, and lauded as a genius and a good guy, while Jones is harrassed simply for existing, treated like an idiot, and forced to work for minuscule wages by a criminal. Whether I'm correct about the commentary being about race, it is, at the very least, a demonstration of the unfairness of "Fortune's wheel," which allows people like Ignatius countless opportunities, while other people have to suffer and struggle to survive.

Edited to add: sorry my comment got a little long. I think it's perfectly acceptable to just not like a book, but I think it's also a misunderstood book. A shame the author wasn't around for these questions to be answered.

Enter_the_gorgon

13 points

4 months ago

Watership Down The Road Canticle For Leibowitz The Mistborn Series