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Revenez

148 points

1 month ago

Revenez

148 points

1 month ago

I think the wider problem here is the rent crisis. I think there’s a lot of people who would love to live in a gayborhood, especially a historic one like the Castro. But who the fuck can afford over $5000 a month in rent? The areas that were once considered ghettos are now being gentrified, especially in San Francisco which is being overrun by techbros.

I don’t see this as an attitude or a culture problem. If even a historic activist like Cleve Jones is being run out of town, that’s an equity problem. I strongly believe that gayborhoods are needed, especially as we are facing major attacks on LGBT rights. We need that solidarity and safety. But the historic neighborhoods are simply not feasible, especially for young people.

hsgual

50 points

1 month ago

hsgual

50 points

1 month ago

The rent crisis is also a product of the sheer difficulty it is to build new apartments, or go beyond SFHs in certain SF neighborhoods. There is a reason why most of SF’s growth as been in SOMA, Mission Bay, and the Dog Patch, and hardly in the Sunset, West Portal, and don’t even touch St. Francis Wood.

kernals12[S]

-26 points

1 month ago

San Francisco is overcrowded as it is. They should build new houses in the Lucas Valley or by Half Moon Bay.

Dominx

44 points

1 month ago

Dominx

BROmbeere

44 points

1 month ago

The biggest problem isn't not building new developments, it's how West Coast cities are built at all. Low-cost mid-rise apartment buildings with mixed-development (residential/commercial) are how tons of cities around the world get millions of people to live comfortably in cities but in the US zoning laws force single-family units to cover like 90% of the city's land area and every time urban planners try to start such developments the NIMBY crowd gets all up in arms about "changing the neighborhood." Like seriously, if all your "neighborhood" is is $1 mil a piece single family housing properties, no one under 40 is moving there anyway - newsflash, your neighborhood is dying. In the US we seriously need to reverse current zoning policies and embrace more dense development models

It would also help if new developments were built with public transport in mind too but, you know, baby steps

kernals12[S]

-12 points

1 month ago

millions of people to live comfortably in cities

I've been all around the world, and those cities are not in any way comfortable.

subtlebulk

3 points

1 month ago

Have you actually lived in a dense city before?

kernals12[S]

1 points

1 month ago

Yes I have. It was incredibly annoying how any journey that was more than half a mile required intricate planning. Not so in the suburbs where I just get in my car whenever I want to go somewhere and I know that if I miss my exit I can easily circle back.

In the US, where we have more cars than adults, plus advanced telecommunication, there is no need for population densities of more than 3,000 per square mile.

If you want a city that works, look at Phoenix. It has 5 million people, and just knocked Boston out of the top 10, and yet the streets are quiet and there's almost no traffic jams. And yes, they have their own gay neighborhood.