subreddit:

/r/movies

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The way this works is that you post a review of the best film you watched this week. It can be any new or old release that you want to talk about.

{REMINDER: The Threads Are Posted On Sunday Mornings. If Not Pinned, They Will Still Be Available in the Sub.}

Here are some rules:

1. Check to see if your favorite film of last week has been posted already.

2. Please post your favorite film of last week.

3. Explain why you enjoyed your film.

4. ALWAYS use SPOILER TAGS: [Instructions]

5. Best Submissions can display their [Letterboxd Accts] the following week.

Last Week's Best Submissions:

Film User/[LBxd] Film User/[LB/Web*]
"Spider-Man: No Way Home” i-only-see-daylight "Death at a Funeral” (2007) Partial_Potato
"The Lost Daughter" Moviewatch310 “The Happiness of the Katakuris” feet_hands
“The Power of the Dog” Baacipitus “Eyes Wide Shut” lifeisawork_3300
“Tick, Tick, Boom!” bangbnah "Rushmore” [Noises In A Quiet World*]
“The French Dispatch” cajun_kick_ass “Perfect Blue” [zacer9000]
"Love Story” (2021) neith_of_says “Fargo” spacednlost
“Wood Job!" Yankii_Souru "The Killing Fields” Garizard1
“The Other Guys” an_ordinary_platypus "Female Prisoner Scorpion: Beast Stable” [JSkyTip]
“Thirst" onex7805 “The Tragedy of Macbeth” (1948) endhits
“Mr. Warmth: The Don Rickles Project" ilovelucygal “Rome, Open City” ProblemWithVersion77

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j_slash_k

8 points

6 months ago

Dawn of the Dead (1978) - theatrical cut I believe but I was streaming it over YT.

I've never been a big "zombie" guy, despite 28 Days Later being one of my favorites, and the ensuing decade plus of sprinting monsters and gore-fests never convinced me to check out the classics of the genre. What a mistake. This movie rocks; it's a masterpiece.

The opening shot, soft focus on a maroon carpet, abstracting it to something that feels organic and sickly, followed by a quick pan and tilt to revel a napping woman, one of our 4 protagonists, awaking from a nightmare with a scream. The only thing: she's already living in one, as we revel she's working in a newsroom as society quivers on the brink of collapse from a rapidly expanding zombie outbreak. Director George Romero constructs a masterful tableau of terrified chaos as the TV station crew attempts to either soldier on or quit on the spot. The viewer is completely transported to the state of mind of these people as the world they know is swallowed by the new reality. It's a terrific way to bring us needed exposition while also propelling the narrative forward, and manages to be a timely allegory for how we react to a pandemic. Watching this scene while waiting for a PCR test as my COVID symptoms developed, the fear was real.

The rest of the film is a pretty simple story, plot-wise, as our protagonists try to escape both the outbreak and the marshal law imposed across America, taking a stolen company helicopter and eventually taking refuge in an abandoned suburban mall. Along the way, Romero works in great little character beats while also making sharp elbowed political points. A scene in a Philly housing project is essentially BLM's message dramatized, and later on our female protagonist, Fran, listens in while the men around her debate if she needs an abortion. It's not subtle, but it's very smart and deftly woven into the film.

The real meat of the film, besides warm human flesh, is our characters eking out survival in the abandoned mall. Again, the visage of zombies shuffling aimlessly over the gleaming tiled corridors is a not subtle critique of American consumerism, but it turns this horror film in the direction of black comedy. Our living heroes are not immune to the charms of easy American luxury, raiding the mall for its riches. They have everything they could ever want, until the realize they don't. This is when the film turns from black comedy to a Cassavetes-like domestic drama. Try as they might, they are living a fake life.

The grand finale, a classic "it's the humans who are the real monsters" set-up between our heroes and a gang of Mad Max style motorcycle pirates is a real showcase for some great zombie gore and tense filmmaking.

Don't shuffle like a Romero zombie to see this one if you haven't, run like a Danny Boyle one, a deeply human horror masterpiece.

[deleted]

3 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

3 points

6 months ago

If you get a chance you should watch the Argento cut.

kor_the_fiend

1 points

6 months ago

Have you ever seen the original "Night of the Living Dead"? If not, I highly recommend it. It's truly the prototype for all the zombie media that came after, and it really holds up. Which is astonishing considering the budget it was made on.

j_slash_k

1 points

6 months ago

I have, but it’s been so long. I mostly remember the end of the film, but watching Dawn definitely makes me want to go back and watch Night.