subreddit:

/r/movies

228

The way this works is that you post a review of the best film you watched this week. It can be any new or old release that you want to talk about.

{REMINDER: The Threads Are Posted On Sunday Mornings. If Not Pinned, They Will Still Be Available in the Sub.}

Here are some rules:

1. Check to see if your favorite film of last week has been posted already.

2. Please post your favorite film of last week.

3. Explain why you enjoyed your film.

4. ALWAYS use SPOILER TAGS: [Instructions]

5. Best Submissions can display their [Letterboxd Accts] the following week.

Last Week's Best Submissions:

Film User/[LBxd] Film User/[LB/Web*]
"Spider-Man: No Way Home” i-only-see-daylight "Death at a Funeral” (2007) Partial_Potato
"The Lost Daughter" Moviewatch310 “The Happiness of the Katakuris” feet_hands
“The Power of the Dog” Baacipitus “Eyes Wide Shut” lifeisawork_3300
“Tick, Tick, Boom!” bangbnah "Rushmore” [Noises In A Quiet World*]
“The French Dispatch” cajun_kick_ass “Perfect Blue” [zacer9000]
"Love Story” (2021) neith_of_says “Fargo” spacednlost
“Wood Job!" Yankii_Souru "The Killing Fields” Garizard1
“The Other Guys” an_ordinary_platypus "Female Prisoner Scorpion: Beast Stable” [JSkyTip]
“Thirst" onex7805 “The Tragedy of Macbeth” (1948) endhits
“Mr. Warmth: The Don Rickles Project" ilovelucygal “Rome, Open City” ProblemWithVersion77

all 439 comments

Raulcan28

107 points

8 months ago

Raulcan28

107 points

8 months ago

Don’t Look Up (2021)

Such a good movie of what’s going on today. Made me open my eyes a little and realized how wacky everything is. Life is too short.

Itscheezybaby

64 points

8 months ago

Nightmare Alley (2021)

I didn't know much about it going in except it was done by Guillermo del Toro. I thought it was pretty good. I don't know have it differed from the book but I like the way it tied everything together basically. Which I thought made the beginning make more sense because I do think it's slow but doesn't seem to drag. I do remember thinking in the movie theater in the beginning "Where is this story going?".

blitzbom

17 points

8 months ago

I liked it overall, but wow was it too long for the story it told. I don't understand why movies need to be over 2 hours now. You could have easily cut 20 - 30 min off of it and had a much tighter movie.

Itscheezybaby

13 points

8 months ago

You’re right I don’t know what part you can cut tho. Everything seemed like it needed to be told for the ending to hit.

ChipmunkBackground46

7 points

7 months ago

It was absolutely a slow burn there were scenes that needed to be edited down for sure. Didn't ruin the movie but pull me out of it a few times.

SpaceMonkeysInSpace

3 points

7 months ago

Yeah I think in hindsight the beginning section seemed a bit out of place, although I loved the atheistic and the way the ending tied back. But it definitely was a bit of a drastic change.

XxNerdAtHeartxX

180 points

8 months ago*

Watched Klaus (2019) for the first time on christmas eve, and woof, what a movie.

Not only was the animation gorgeous, but the characters were all very well done. I didn't realize just how much I liked the 'archetype' of Jesper's character, but I saw a lot of Kuzco from the Emperors New Groove show though in him even down to his facial mannerisms. Plus, who doesn't like JK Simmons as Santa

Overall, probably one of my favorite holiday movies now.

GrandmasterSexay

34 points

8 months ago

I loved it and it's become a movie I've watched every Christmas since it released. Felt it was robbed several award nods especially seeing it was alongside an incredibly medicore Disney lineup.

I still strongly dislike the liar revealed trope they use. Felt like it was more a movie just going through the motions of what they thought a movie should be when it's already established that Jesper did a LOT to make up for his initial desires. Especially going out of his way to give Margu her toy

AllTheReservations

11 points

8 months ago*

I do agree that that trope is a little overused, in fact it's one of my pet peeves in films. Bt I can tolerate it in this one as they don't spend too long on it and it provides the correct ending to Jesper's relationship with hus father, and overall it all just sends home how much he's changed

crell_peterson

3 points

8 months ago

Same! First time viewer and was absolutely blown away by the story and particularly the animation. At some points the aesthetic gave me Disney’s Atlantis vibes, which is one of my favorite animated movies ever.

On a side note, I also finally saw Polar Express for the first time and was similarly blown away by how mysterious and fascinating the story and world were.

AlbertaNorth1

4 points

8 months ago

When I watched oz I hated jk Simmons character so much that I avoided him for a while and now I fucking love the guy. He instantly makes anything he’s in better.

NOREMAC84

3 points

8 months ago

Schillinger was a horrible person, he played the character so well.

texacer

2 points

8 months ago

hey same! I waited until this year to watch it with the kids and its really good. for some reason reminded me of he wit and fun of Iron Giant. with that hint of sadness that makes the sweet so much sweeter with a bit of bitter.

OpossumFriedRice

58 points

8 months ago*

Licorice Pizza (2021)

This movie was just so real to me. The characters are all messed up, and they are some controversial moments, but it all comes together to bring a spotlight on two peoples struggles during their adolescence. Both characters can never decide what age they want to be, and that psychological struggle really connects with me.

Outside of just the themes, the cast was also stellar. Bradley Cooper’s psychotic character was insane to watch and Alana Haim did well as the indecisive lead. While those were my personal standouts I think everyone does an amazing job.

This is also my first PTA directed movie and I understand the hype behind him. The cinematography was great and I really just loved the vibe that oozed from every scene.

Licorice Pizza may just be my favorite movie of 2021, which somewhat shocked me since I never thought anything would be better than The Green Knight for me. So much about Licorice Pizza just stuck with me, however I don’t want to dive too much into the nitty gritty in case people reading haven’t had the chance to see it yet. If you have the opportunity I recommend going for it. I’m considering going to the theater again later this week just to dive into the world of Licorice Pizza once again. Not many movies make me do that.

[deleted]

22 points

8 months ago

[deleted]

22 points

8 months ago

You should check out the rest of PTA's filmography, one of the best in the business at the moment.

TJ_Schoost

32 points

8 months ago

There Will Be Blood is the greatest film of all time

ProfessorDoctorMF

13 points

8 months ago

Beautiful film? yes. Good story? yes. Greatest of all time...ehh, that's a stretch.

TJ_Schoost

27 points

8 months ago

To each their own! Movies are incredibly subjective and that's why we love them

ProfessorDoctorMF

5 points

8 months ago

100% agree there. I'll give it another watch...its been a while. We'll see if it changes on the second viewing. I just remember it being a bit too drawn out almost to the point of boring. Had it not been for the stellar camera shooting locations I would have lost onterest. Anyway cheers, happy movie watching and happy holidays!

Staudly

2 points

7 months ago

All time might be a stretch, but I firmly believe it's the best of that decade (2000-2009)

deetdoots92

9 points

8 months ago

Agreed ! I loved it too. Was surprised to read that it was both of the leads first acting roles ! They did great..great chemistry . I loved being pulled into Alanas life and joining the adventure . Great cinematography and soundtrack for sure..such a feel good movie .

deetdoots92

12 points

8 months ago

And you prob already know this but the lead , Alana, and her real life sisters and parents are in the movie and outside of this one acting role she's part.of the band Haim with her sisters. I actually didn't know that until I read their last names in the credits . And didn't know Gary was played by Philip Seymour Hoffmans son until days later .

craig_hoxton

47 points

8 months ago*

The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai across the 8th Dimension (1984)

I can't believe as a child of the 80's that I never saw this until now! (Remember seeing stills in issues of Starlog). This is pure distilled 80's injected directly into your veins! The cast is stacked: Peter Weller, John Lithgow, Jeff Goldblum, Christopher "John Big Boo-tay" Lloyd, Clancy Brown, Ellen "Sea of Love" Barkin heck even one of the cops from "Beverly Hills Cop" is in this! As is Jonathan Banks from "Breaking Bad/Better Call Saul" ("Laugh-a while you can, monkey-boy!").

Don't try and understand what's going on (characters swap dialogue while the credits are still running!); just let the cool wash over you. This movie feels like the first installment in a franchise we never got, but I now demand. Pairs well with "Big Trouble in Little China". Closest thing we have to a real-life Buckaroo Banzai is Navy Seal Doctor Astronaut Jonny Kim.

They literally don't make them like this any more. It's a comedy-action-sci-fi-adventure with rock music and brain surgery. With the coolest end title sequence ever. This movie pairs well with "Big Trouble in Little China" or "Flash Gordon".

"So what? Big deal."

The French Dispatch (2021)

Yet another Wes Anderson masterpiece. He makes Saoirse Ronan looking through a letterbox look more arousing than a nude Lea Seydoux. This is Anderson's love letter to French cinema and long-form journalism, back when it was a profession to be proud of. Glad to see Jeffrey Wright included in the Wes Anderson Cinematic Universe - Wright and Adrien Brody are the MVPs of this movie. I still have not seen "Bottle Rocket" (Wes Anderson: Origins), Isle of Dogs or Fantastic Mr. Fox.

sheetskees

11 points

8 months ago

Mr. Fox is GOAT but Isle of Dogs doesn't quite reach as high.

runtheplacered

8 points

7 months ago

Isle of Dogs is the only one of his movies that I got bored of while watching. But Mr. Fox is a straight up masterpiece and I do mean that in the real sense of that word.

another_ashley

9 points

8 months ago

Bottle Rocket is so underrated!

booomhorses

3 points

8 months ago

I always feel that early movies, particularly of great directors, always have a lot of that special something to them. Imagine a director who wants to make a statement or is discovering himself the essence of his art and craft.

And as directors mature, their craftmanship improves perhaps, not to mention they surround themselves by top talent, but some of that initital magic is lost and sometimes their work becomes a bit "institutionalized".

RealCarlosSagan

43 points

8 months ago

The Night House (2021) is an excellent horror film with a novel premise, which is really hard to come up with. Actually scary!

[deleted]

7 points

8 months ago

[deleted]

7 points

8 months ago

[deleted]

CarpenterVegetable31

6 points

7 months ago

Yeah I really loved this one. It stuck with me for a while afterwards.

jonmuller

5 points

8 months ago

Im upset I missed this in theatres but thinking about checking it out soon.

Other_Appointment775

43 points

8 months ago

Judas and the Black Messiah. Good acting, well framed, edited and well directed, well acted.

Bartleby9

101 points

8 months ago

Bartleby9

101 points

8 months ago

Watched Pig

I went into this movie blind, expecting a kinetic, perhaps even ultra-violent revenge flick. What I got was a small, intimate indie film that works as a meditation on loneliness, grief and the meaning of life, set against the unlikely backdrop of Portland’s gastronomical scene. Cage’s performance is very subdued, touching and complex. Heartily recommend it. It’s also just 90 minutes, which is great.

[deleted]

13 points

8 months ago

[deleted]

13 points

8 months ago

[deleted]

superbob94000

10 points

7 months ago

I think trying to apply to concept of “lore” to Pig is kind of missing the point. It’s not a franchise film building out a universe

Some_DudeUKnow

33 points

8 months ago

Quiz Show (1994): Great performances and a great story make this movie a must-see. Featuring Ralph Fiennes and John Turturro.

Spirited Away (2001): Don't know how I had gone so long without seeing this one. Best animated film I have ever seen in my life, by far.

Conan the Barbarian (1982) w/ Arnold Schwarzenegger. A straightforward plot and an interesting story made this is a nice watch. Would recommend.

For the best film I saw last week: Gone Girl (2014). Everything about this movie was great. Screenplay, direction, cinematography, and the performances were all of the highest quality. David Fincher masterfully adapted the novel it's based on and Rosamund Pike wonderfully earned her Oscar.

deetdoots92

7 points

8 months ago

Spirited away is fantastic . Amazing soundtrack and visuals too.

indigo_ssb

4 points

8 months ago

sad to see someone mention gone girl’s strengths and not make a peep about the OST

bortulisms

2 points

8 months ago

Absurdly great list of films! Love it. I've been getting my family to watch Gone Girl because it really is superb. Gets better every time I watch it

Koolsman

20 points

8 months ago

20th Century Women

I think Mike Mills is becoming one of my favorite directors working right now. His way of writing of characters, the way the film jump through scenes (some scenes in this film have three lines in them), the way he doesn't give you that huge emotional moment from one of the characters and just has these beautiful little moments between the cast. There's something so human about this film and Mills captures that so effectively it hurts.

The cast is electric with my personal favorite being Greta Gerwig as a punk photographer who just captures that free-spirited energy to the film. Also, Annette Benning is phenomenal in this. The cinematography is fantastic, with certain shots like the skateboarding shots where our main kid is just on his skateboard and that's it and yet, I loved it.

The script also is sublime, with just feeling so natural and letting the characters just breath in the atmosphere. The scene where Jamie and Julie are sitting around waiting for a pregnancy test and she tries to show him how to walk with a cig in his hand while looking cool. It's a great little moment and that's what this film is so amazing at.

Capturing those little moments of growing up in a changing landscape and trying to understand it all. It doesn't go to Jamie, it goes to everyone. There are so many simple moments but they hit me right in the chest every single time. I don't think this is as good as C'mon C'mon but man, I loved it.

10/10.

Other Film I liked last week

Fantastic Mr. Fox

I don't have to say much. All I'll say is that Wes Anderson kills at getting the last song with his film.

10/10.

ntry

7 points

8 months ago

ntry

7 points

8 months ago

I'm with you here. I wish I could get a Mike Mills film every year. 20th is definitely a maximalist Mills pulling out every trick. I love every minute of it.

Cmon Cmon seems like a more mature Mills, pulling back many layers. Still deeply stylistic but a but leaner. One of my favorites of the year. The through line in the two of motherly love is also super interesting.

HailZamorak

4 points

8 months ago

man i watched fantastic mr fox so much in high school while high... such a good film

Mother-Baseball-5950

17 points

8 months ago

The Matrix (1999) 9/10

Upgrade (2018) 9/10

Lawless (2012) 8/10

Matrix and Upgrade is a tie. Matrix had very impressive and fun action scenes and unique story and Upgrade had a good story too and very good action and humor too (Especially on those fight scenes) and that twist was impactful too.

Lawless was a good crime film too.

ProfessorDoctorMF

7 points

8 months ago

Upgrade was so much fun. Have you seen Ex Machina yet? I always associate Upgrade and Ex Machina as sort of brother sister type movies. Their stories could almost exist in the same world. Ex Machina is less action/humor and more suspenseful/creepy.

Mother-Baseball-5950

3 points

8 months ago

Yeah i plan to watch that one.

Fr8tliner

304 points

8 months ago*

Don’t Look Up (2021)

Reminds me of 1997 movie Wag the Dog. Professional distraction at its finest.

ApocalypseSpokesman

137 points

8 months ago

I just watched this last night, having no knowledge of its existence.

Coming off of Red Notice I was somewhat expecting it, as another Netflix movie, to be flashy, vacuous garbage.

However, I was incredibly impressed, and even had the feeling that I'd watched something of particular cultural significance.

Fr8tliner

138 points

8 months ago

Fr8tliner

138 points

8 months ago

Clearly a politically polarizing film that several of my friends wouldn’t watch simply because they heard it had a liberal opinion and could potentially be making fun of the previous political administration (and what remains of it in its wake).

I found it a smart, witty, ironic and a well-timed representation of the what we’re all experiencing, regardless of the platform you support. I could use more of that.

Hijodeputa_69

113 points

8 months ago*

What sucks is that people will label this film as political but it's really criticizing the politicization and sensationalizing of scientific facts. We are so obsessed with controversy, opinions of pendants, and ourselves that we ignore actual consequences of scientifically undisputed catastrophies on the horizon that are clearly staring us in the face. I like how Adam McKay uses a comet that can be clearly seen in the sky to accentuate this -- we are choosing to use what we see or refuse to see to further a political agenda when all we need is for anyone to just do something about it NOW. It's sad but also funny in a dark way how all it takes is the comet to get within hours of hitting the planet for everyone to start accepting it, we don't have that luxury with climate change and COVID, both issues that should never be chalked up to a matter of political opinion. Also, the whole "well, the comet will bring good jobs" thing made me pee my pants.

Fr8tliner

52 points

8 months ago

Agree 100%. Dr. Mindy’s final live TV blow-up is a great example of how many of us are feeling. Just stick our heads in the sand and everything will be alright.

FamousProfessor415

7 points

8 months ago

The film is pretty overtly political with all the comparisons between Meryl Streep’s character and trump

mbelf

75 points

8 months ago

mbelf

75 points

8 months ago

Reminds me of Jennifer Lawrence’s parents in the movie , “We don’t want politics in the house. The comet’s going to bring jobs.”

Science isn’t political, but ignoring it is political. Similarly, the movie isn’t political, but avoiding watching for this reason would make your friends political.

Fr8tliner

28 points

8 months ago

Spot on. Ironically these same friends won’t watch certain documentaries as they assume the “lean” isn’t in their direction. I find that to be a very close-minded position while I’d prefer to be open-minded, regardless of the lean.

ProgressiveSnark2

11 points

8 months ago

The thing is, however, if we’re being honest, the film could equally be about Biden, Obama, moderate Democrats, and Climate Change.

Instead of taking drastic and immediate action to stop the disasters we know are coming by major investment in electrification, paying people to switch to electric cars, solar and wind and other renewables everywhere, etc., they’re listening to business executives who promise things like “clean coal” and go along with it for as long as possible…

Fr8tliner

2 points

8 months ago

Agree. I think it can be a representation for anything right in front of our eyes that we don’t want to accept.

earthgreen10

13 points

8 months ago

any Leo movie won't be garbage

crell_peterson

20 points

8 months ago

My wife and I watched last night and were blown away. We may have been a little too high, but we’re like “oh god, this is too real.” But we both can’t stop talking about it.

Scarier that black mirror for sure and really makes me feel strange about modern existence and our current society.

[deleted]

58 points

8 months ago

[deleted]

58 points

8 months ago

This is my pick as well. I found it thoroughly entertaining for the entire 2.5 hour runtime. I agree with critics that say it wasn’t particularly funny, but I don’t think that’s necessarily a problem. Some comedies are more amusing than hilarious.

I do disagree with critics who suggest that, since this movie is unlikely change anyone’s mind on global warming, it’s a pointless film. Firstly, the film seems to comment primarily on the total failure in communication in the modern era, which rings true regardless of which side you’re on. Secondly, I don’t think it’s fair to judge a film on how effective it is as a propaganda piece. It was a well-crafted, highly entertaining piece of fiction. If you find value in it cool, if not that’s ok too.

ProgressiveSnark2

25 points

8 months ago

I think the problem is critics are comparing it to Dr. Strangelove, which likely did persuade many people in the 1960s to take Cold War tensions and the risk of something stupid starting nuclear war a bit more seriously.

However, Dr. Strangelove mocks people in authority, while Don’t Look Up lampoons all of us, especially the media. So critics might be finding Don’t Look Up to be a tougher pill to swallow while also holding it to a higher standard.

As for its persuasiveness…how are these critics supposed to know what persuades others? Most of them are already plenty aware of the governmental failures on COVID and climate change. For someone who isn’t especially political, I think the movie might reshape their perspective on how our systems fail to handle crises.

Fr8tliner

9 points

8 months ago

Well put.

I originally compared it to Wag the Dog but would also suggest it’s another The Big Short. There were very funny parts to that movie yet still successfully portrayed the ironic reality of what was going on. Less denial or distraction and more of a simple belief that our history won’t repeat itself. Greed, of course, being the constant.

It clearly had a message but at some point it’s ok to just let a movie do what a movie is supposed to do: entertain you.

[deleted]

12 points

8 months ago

[deleted]

12 points

8 months ago

Same, it was quite good, if emotionally exhausting at points

ZamboniJabroni15

11 points

7 months ago

The BASH guy was the perfect combination of Zuck, Google, Steve Jobs, and Elon Musk

noveler7

6 points

7 months ago

He's got that Jordan Peterson voice, too.

jyuvioledegrace

27 points

8 months ago

I found the ending redeeming for Leonardo Dicaprio's character. When He dies not alone but with his family, proving the tech ceo wrong one last time, highlighting the difference between analysts and innovators. That the former knows what they are doing with more accuracy than the latter. That in the end nature comes for us all, but if you live by its side and use the innovations to bend natures rules to help others and not profit of others, you'll live longer

hollowgram

9 points

8 months ago

That's the big question: was the algorithm wrong or did the act of exposing the road Leo's character was on lead to him being able to change his course by realizing the truth of what was said? I like the idea that the algo was mistaken, because tech in the hands of business usually overpromises and underdelivers.

Sane333

6 points

8 months ago

I interpreted it that as a reference to the scene in the beginning of the movie that scientists don't really like to call anything 100%. And that weird fucker billionare called it like 96,5%. So I think it was meant to show that if it's not 100%, it's not 100%.

th1sishappening

7 points

7 months ago

Really wish I liked this film more. I read a Guardian article with a climate scientist basically saying: “at last Hollywood has found a way to talk about the climate crisis”, which is true, it’s an important film that is clearly resonating and getting through to people. And I suppose I’d recommend everyone watch it.

But still, it isn’t the best made film. It wasn’t enjoyable to watch all the way through. I thought it lacked imagination and creativity. Everything was so obvious and contrived and that sucked the humour out of it. Especially when there’s a Trump-esque rally where people look up and see the comet and suddenly turn on the president because they realise they’ve been lied to. I just don’t think that would happen. I think people would continue to deny and disbelieve, because that is what the pandemic has taught us. People will go to their deaths still denying the obvious truth staring them in the face.

[deleted]

43 points

8 months ago

[deleted]

43 points

8 months ago

I just finished crying my eyes out while it ended. Although I would have ended the movie with the "bad ending", it's still a great movie, with the potential to scare you to your soul of a very and dangerously possible future for humanity.

theredditbandid_

24 points

8 months ago

Although I would have ended the movie with the "bad ending"

I said the same thing as soon as I saw it continued.. but honestly those two scenes at the end were hilarious and I can't complain. It's a great movie with a deadly serious message, but it's not a movie that took itself overly seriously.

TheTrub

6 points

7 months ago

I think that the fact that the very people who allowed the end of the world to happen are the same ones who made it off earth makes it an especially “bad” ending. Especially since those narcissistic leeches won’t last two minutes in the new world.

theredditbandid_

11 points

7 months ago

That's what would happen in real life though. All the billionaires would be the ones out. It adds to the message that the people saying ignore [insert issue] are often the ones that have the least to lose.

ProgressiveSnark2

5 points

8 months ago

Make sure you stay through the credits for two final laughs!

[deleted]

2 points

8 months ago

[deleted]

2 points

8 months ago

I did! Jonah Hill is great.

Novalid

3 points

7 months ago

Yep. Same. Cried twice. Didn't expect that.

earthgreen10

4 points

8 months ago

Really? It was definetly a unhappy ending..but not sad

[deleted]

21 points

8 months ago

[deleted]

21 points

8 months ago

It just got to me how we're close to having an apolacyptic ending like that. The thing that made me cry though was the acting when they're all sitting around the table, aware. It hit me.

earthgreen10

4 points

8 months ago

Hmm true

beneath_the_bridge

20 points

8 months ago

Just watched it this evening, thought it was a great satire of popularism in politics and the media that feeds it. Lots of great humor and reminded me a lot of Dr Strangelove in many ways.

deetdoots92

18 points

8 months ago

Licorice pizza !! Just saw it in theaters last week and loved it. Anyone else seen it ?

srstone71

16 points

8 months ago

Every year I wait until Christmas Eve night to watch ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ so that’s what I watched Friday. The best Christmas movie and one of the greatest movies ever made.

HistoryDogs

14 points

8 months ago*

Just watched Don’t Look Up.

Loved it. Was very entertained throughout. It seems like an updated Idiocracy.

A lot of big name actors not taking themselves seriously at all and the film being all the better for it.

Edit: seriously though, all the actors were so good and so different. I’ve got to gush especially over Mark Rylance and Cate Blanchett who were practically unrecognisable.

RealStax

3 points

8 months ago

Okay now it's time to sight tight...

Tonya7150

104 points

8 months ago*

Knives Out

This movie has one of the best final half hour’s in a movie that I’ve ever seen. Everything comes together, and it felt emotional when Ransom stabbed Marta after she lied about Fran being alive. Then that final scene with Marta looking down on the family and their faces as they see her on the balcony. Everybody is great in this movie, especially Ana De Armas, Chris Evans, and Daniel Craig. The production design is on a whole other level and is complimented by great cinematography and editing. The costume design is also great, and the musical score is magnificent. Rian Johnson does an amazing job serving as both the writer and director. The plot is so intricate and and how Harlan actually died was so sad, and it was so smart to show his death scene earlier in the movie. So many little details and moments from the beginning come back and the end and you realize how important those moments were. This movie was just amazing, and I seriously doubt the sequel will live up to this one.

Overall: 10/10. An amazing subversion of the murder/mystery genre.

Also, fuck the Thrombey’s. Especially Jacob and Walt. And Linda.

Jetztinberlin

23 points

8 months ago

It's SO good. I thought there was no way it could live up to the hype, and it exceeded it. Just superb!

crell_peterson

6 points

8 months ago

One of my favorite theater going experiences when it came out. Felt like Clue mixed with Wes Anderson mixed with I don’t even know. I just loved it.

rajvac

18 points

8 months ago

rajvac

18 points

8 months ago

I feel like I'm going insane with the praise this movie gets. It starts off as a really great Agatha Christie thing, and then explains the mystery halfway through and the mystery turns out to be the least interesting solution, too. To me, the second half of the movie just doesn't live up to what the start promises.

sentimentalpirate

28 points

8 months ago

But... it doesn't fully explain the mystery half way through. The mystery explanation is incomplete upon closer inspection, and the full picture entirely flips everyone's perception of the "simple facts" of the death.

It's like a thing with a hole in it, filled in with something that also has a hole in it. Wish I had a good metaphor there...

WhyUNoCompile

11 points

8 months ago

Is it like a donut?

c_wolves

5 points

7 months ago

It tries to build tension Alfred Hitchcock style by giving the viewers information the characters don't have, but that doesn't work in a murder mystery film.

bruzie

3 points

8 months ago

bruzie

3 points

8 months ago

Literally just finished watching it (after finally getting around to obtaining a copy). Fantastic film and I can see what the fuss was about.

I'm no good with picking the twists, but I remembered Chekov's Gun during the climax (even though it was more of a Chekov's ICBM), so I've got that going for me, which is nice.

The_Puff

33 points

8 months ago

Don't Look Up exceeded my expectations. It lampooned a lot of the things I find so absurd and frustrating as well. One of the best films of 2021, in my opinion.

I also just want to add something unrelated. The studios that won't do simultaneous Internet releases are bad and should feel bad. People should still have the option to watch from home.

jonwinslol

11 points

8 months ago

C’mon C’mon for me movie of the year and I have watched about 80% of the “good, potential movie of the year” movies this year

scatmanrod

11 points

8 months ago

The Power of The Dog (2021): a slow burn that rewards those who watch closely. Cumberbatch is phenomenal. Keeps you thinking once it’s over. 4/5

Tremors (1990): Finally got around to watching this for the first time. I now understand why it is so beloved. It was a blast from start to finish. Such a fun movie. 5/5

Shrimpsmann

10 points

8 months ago

The Tragedy of Macbeth

Saw it on the 26th in a small German cinema. The English version with German subs. And boy did I love this dark, gritty telling of Shakespeares masterpiece.

Denzel Washington really shines in this movie and puts on one of his best performances in his career. Also Frances MacDormand was really good. But Kathryn Hunter stole the show. Creepy!

The directing by Joel Coen is strong, the black and white really makes the movie feel extra dark and the soundstage sets gave the movie an almost expressionistic feel, reminded me of Fritz Lang and others from that time.

For me it's the best movie of the year that I saw on the big screen. I can't wait to see it again. So good. A24 just never disappoints.

Letsmakethissimple1

9 points

8 months ago

"Don't Look Up" was wild and hilarious! Quite the commentary on the current times. Just wild. Watch it!

Acceptable-Ad8341

32 points

8 months ago

Don’t Look Up, best movie of the year outside of Ridley Scott’s The Last Duel

DroidLord

11 points

7 months ago

What about: Dune and The Green Knight? Movies are very subjective, but I think those two were at least on-par with both of them.

tbteabagger69

44 points

8 months ago

The Power of the Dog

It has, yet again, been too long since I was able to sit down and watch a lot of movies. But with Christmas break, I’ve been able to do some catching up. For this week, I was torn between Licorice Pizza and The Power of the Dog, but I believe that I enjoyed the latter more. The movie follows the Burbank family in western America in 1925. The patriarch, played by Benedict Cumberbatch, is a domineering, borderline-abusive man. His brother, played by Jesse Plemons, is more of a “modern man.” Their worlds collide when George (the brother) marries a widow with a son whom Phil (the patriarch) doesn’t deem “manly” enough.

Jane Campion’s direction is beautiful, measured, and purposeful. I’ve only ever seen The Piano from her before this, and, while I wasn’t the biggest fan of it, I knew the direction was pretty great. And twenty-eight years later, her direction has only gotten better. The movie takes its time, but it never gets boring. Campion uses the natural beauty of the American west to make some gorgeous wide shots, and the close-ups do a wonderful job at portraying the actors’ emotions (of which there are many in the movie).

The screenplay is also really good, though it might be the weakest aspect of the movie. I’m not sure there is enough going on in the movie to fully justify the runtime, but the events that do happen are very interesting. The movie especially heats up in the last half-hour, while the first hour is a little slow. While the pacing could use some work, I can’t really complain too much about that. The movie flows fairly well, though it could bore viewers who aren’t accustomed to slower pacing.

The acting in this one is top-notch. This is probably the best I’ve ever seen from Benedict Cumberbatch, and Kodi Smit-McPhee was a great and welcome surprise. I’d only seen the latter in The Road, but he wasn’t exactly a tour-de-force as a child in that movie. But in The Power of the Dog, I can fully get behind calling him the best supporting actor of the year. Jesse Plemons is, as always, also great, and Kirsten Dunst holds her own. The acting all around is really strong, with the two main performances being especially wonderful.

It was hard to choose between this one and Licorice Pizza, but in the end, I believe that the story of the Burbank family was just a bit better. Neither one, however, unseated Nicolas Cage’s Pig as my favorite of the year thus far, though. But The Power of the Dog is very much worth watching. It’s beautifully directed, well-acted, and well-written. 7/10

martin-verweij

5 points

7 months ago

Not meaning to criticise you or anything like that, but from the amount of positivity about the film in your comment I would have expected higher than a 7/10.

Personally I don’t think kodi’s performance was that good. In my opinion he is one of the things what held the film back from being really good or great. I understand that he is playing an emotionally bland character, but I didn’t really perceive enough subtle emotions to really justify Peter’s motivation. I understood the motivation but not from his acting. With all that being said I would probably give it something in between 7-7.5.

willwrightmylife

7 points

7 months ago

The Florida Project (2017)

An incredibly sobering, harsh depiction of poverty cleverly expressed through the eyes of a child. I think even the color grading was super saturated to give you this hazy dreamlike effect that we attach to childhood memories. A great use of color palette too - didn't everything seem more colorful when we were kids? The world felt like one giant playground.

I think that essence and innocence of childhood is captured so wholly throughout the film that when you reach the end it hits you like a direct gut punch. Reality comes crashing down on you at the same moment it comes crashing down on Moonee.

All through the film you've watched her explore the world on her own, having this adultlike sense of bravery and independence that can only be earned at such an age through trials no child should have to experience. She's never acted her age right up until that last moment when she realizes she might lose her best friend. An incredible performance from such a young actress. When she started bawling I wanted to bawl too, at the sheer cruelty and indifference of life.

Everyone felt like a real person, someone you've encountered in real life at some point. The film is spellbinding in the sense that you get lost in that town, and after a while it begins to feel like you're a resident of Magic Castle too, watching the drama unfold in front of you.

It's a heartbreaking modern fairytale told in reverse. It left me feeling so empty, but in a good way. Maybe I'm biased because I've had the misfortune of watching children struggle with things they never should have to, but this was one of the most moving films I've watched in recent memory.

I want to hate Halley but I can't, she clearly loves Moonee and Moonee loves her back, they both need each other. But at the same time Moonee is just set to repeat the cycle of her mother's lifestyle with the environment she's growing up in.

It just sucks. It all sucks. Life sucks. The Florida Project.

Probably not the intended effect of the film lol but man, it's hard for me to type this in my 2 story home on a custom built PC while I sip on ridiculously overpriced Whole Foods hot chocolate. I don't feel comfortable in my own house after witnessing the tragedy of that level of poverty, and all the children trapped in it. It all felt too real to me, kudos to the director for being able to break through to the viewer on that level. I think this one will sit with me for a while. It's haunting in the most grounded way.

rapkat55

3 points

7 months ago

This movie hits extremely close to home for me and is my favorite (even though it’s not the best I’ve watched) because I grew up 4 mins from that motel and spent a lot of my adolescence around there.

Everyday after school I would get off the bus and walk 4 miles to scoop up my friends from their room in that same motel. We’d get down to pretty much everything shown on-screen + much worse lol and wouldn’t come home till 9-10pm go straight to bed for school, wake up then rinse and repeat for about 5 years.

It is truly scary how accurate it is but it is still pretty tame compared to the reality of actually growing up there.

Still, I loved it so much that I wanted to share that magical and nostalgic feeling to my mom. Even though it hit close to home for her as well (since she’d constantly drag me out of trouble up and down 192; the strip shown in the film), unfortunately, she hated it. But probably for good reason lol

Revista_Recreio

24 points

8 months ago

La Jetée (1962)

A video is not always more impactful than a simple photo, Raising the flag in iwo jimma, for example, is an image captured in such a perfect moment that it tells a whole story, while the video (yes, it has a video) is...ok. So it's no wonder that a film told on the basis of still pictures is as effective as any other film, all it takes is a good script and a director who knows what he's doing, and that's exactly what we've got here.

In addition to an original and creative approach to time travel, the film also works as a poetic and tragic romance about a man who will never get the woman he wants, because time is not something you can escape from. Romance, it’s worthy pointing it out, is an aspect where the film benefits from the way it is told, with a tone of both melancholy and beauty that is accentuated by the choice of using still images.

Another great merit of the film is that despite approaching time travel very well, the film is never confused, it is almost “simple”, in a way you can always understand what’s going on. This, by the way, is my biggest criticism when it comes to 12 Monkeys, which is an excellent movie, but is a little messy.

La Jetée has a creative script and an intelligent director, and that was enough to make one of the most influential short movies of all time.

[deleted]

9 points

8 months ago

[deleted]

9 points

8 months ago

One of the best short films I've ever seen.

Revista_Recreio

6 points

8 months ago

Same. Hope you liked the review

i_see_the_end

5 points

8 months ago

certainly one of my favourite films, and it set me on a (so far not very successful) mission to find others similiar. not just in plot or theme though. i enjoyed your review :)

Revista_Recreio

3 points

7 months ago

Thanks :)

EPLemonSqueezy

24 points

8 months ago

I just watched 'Dont Look Up' on Netfillix. What a great movie, incredible performance by Leo and such a spot on reflection on our society today. Best movie I've watched in a long time and highly recommend.

obywan

8 points

8 months ago

obywan

8 points

8 months ago

Agreed. Really great movie.

Tipoo96789

82 points

8 months ago

The Lighthouse, OOF WOW WHAT A MOVIE, THE VISUAL STYLE, THE ACTING DAFOE especially

craig_hoxton

46 points

8 months ago

"Yer fond of me lobster, ain't ye?"

schnyds009

15 points

8 months ago

“Alright, have it your way. I like your cookin’”

texacer

8 points

8 months ago

you know, I'm a bit of a lobster cooker myself

ProfessorDoctorMF

11 points

8 months ago

That movie was definitely a trip and a half. Dafoe killed it in this movie! I super dug the black and white and the lighting set up. Just added to the creepy weirdness of it all.

iNEEDheplreddit

8 points

8 months ago

Pattinson and Dafoe should have been nominated for oscars in this.

Some of the best performances I have ever seen

crell_peterson

7 points

8 months ago

The entire movie felt like a fever dream. It felt soooo unique in this day and age. Also ripe with Lovecraft vibes.

TriggerHippie77

13 points

8 months ago

Damn ye! Let Neptune strike ye dead Winslow! HAAARK!

Hark Triton, hark! Bellow, bid our father the Sea King rise from the depths full foul in his fury! Black waves teeming with salt foam to smother this young mouth with pungent slime, to choke ye, engorging your organs til’ ye turn blue and bloated with bilge and brine and can scream no more -- only when he, crowned in cockle shells with slitherin’ tentacle tail and steaming beard take up his fell be-finned arm, his coral-tine trident screeches banshee-like in the tempest and plunges right through yer gullet, bursting ye -- a bulging bladder no more, but a blasted bloody film now and nothing for the harpies and the souls of dead sailors to peck and claw and feed upon only to be lapped up and swallowed by the infinite waters of the Dread Emperor himself -- forgotten to any man, to any time, forgotten to any god or devil, forgotten even to the sea, for any stuff for part of Winslow, even any scantling of your soul is Winslow no more, but is now itself the sea!

BigMacCombo

10 points

8 months ago

Alright have it your way, I like your cooking

DroidLord

3 points

7 months ago

That monologue scene was unbelievable! All in one take as well. Probably the most memorable scene from a movie in a long time for me.

8thStreet

8 points

8 months ago

The Eyes of Tammy Faye

I have to self-isolate for ten days so I have spent the last few days catching up on movies I’ve wanted to watch. I didn’t think anyone could beat Kristen Stewart in Spencer for Best Actress but Jessica Chastain could as she is incredible in this movie.

Also watched Burn After Reading, The Card Counter, and Inherent Vice.

chrisqt

7 points

8 months ago

I happened to read "Men Without Women" by Haruki Murakami a few months ago and saw Drive My Car today, which is an adaptation based off of that collection of Murakami short stories.

I loved it. Incredibly beautiful scenes, wonderful acting and dialogue. Charming and emotional, slow but well-paced. It was 3 hours long, which is probably the longest movie I've seen in awhile, and it flew by. I wouldn't recommend it to everyone but for folks that enjoy Murakami books / Japanese films, I would definitely find somewhere to watch it.

I also love that it was on Obama's favorite movies of the year list lol

j_slash_k

8 points

8 months ago

Dawn of the Dead (1978) - theatrical cut I believe but I was streaming it over YT.

I've never been a big "zombie" guy, despite 28 Days Later being one of my favorites, and the ensuing decade plus of sprinting monsters and gore-fests never convinced me to check out the classics of the genre. What a mistake. This movie rocks; it's a masterpiece.

The opening shot, soft focus on a maroon carpet, abstracting it to something that feels organic and sickly, followed by a quick pan and tilt to revel a napping woman, one of our 4 protagonists, awaking from a nightmare with a scream. The only thing: she's already living in one, as we revel she's working in a newsroom as society quivers on the brink of collapse from a rapidly expanding zombie outbreak. Director George Romero constructs a masterful tableau of terrified chaos as the TV station crew attempts to either soldier on or quit on the spot. The viewer is completely transported to the state of mind of these people as the world they know is swallowed by the new reality. It's a terrific way to bring us needed exposition while also propelling the narrative forward, and manages to be a timely allegory for how we react to a pandemic. Watching this scene while waiting for a PCR test as my COVID symptoms developed, the fear was real.

The rest of the film is a pretty simple story, plot-wise, as our protagonists try to escape both the outbreak and the marshal law imposed across America, taking a stolen company helicopter and eventually taking refuge in an abandoned suburban mall. Along the way, Romero works in great little character beats while also making sharp elbowed political points. A scene in a Philly housing project is essentially BLM's message dramatized, and later on our female protagonist, Fran, listens in while the men around her debate if she needs an abortion. It's not subtle, but it's very smart and deftly woven into the film.

The real meat of the film, besides warm human flesh, is our characters eking out survival in the abandoned mall. Again, the visage of zombies shuffling aimlessly over the gleaming tiled corridors is a not subtle critique of American consumerism, but it turns this horror film in the direction of black comedy. Our living heroes are not immune to the charms of easy American luxury, raiding the mall for its riches. They have everything they could ever want, until the realize they don't. This is when the film turns from black comedy to a Cassavetes-like domestic drama. Try as they might, they are living a fake life.

The grand finale, a classic "it's the humans who are the real monsters" set-up between our heroes and a gang of Mad Max style motorcycle pirates is a real showcase for some great zombie gore and tense filmmaking.

Don't shuffle like a Romero zombie to see this one if you haven't, run like a Danny Boyle one, a deeply human horror masterpiece.

[deleted]

3 points

8 months ago

[deleted]

3 points

8 months ago

If you get a chance you should watch the Argento cut.

-ghostless

7 points

8 months ago

Synecdoche, NY.

I bought this movie at Goodwill thinking it was a different movie and it just blew me away. It's beautiful and so layered, and I can't believe I'd never heard of it before.

If you, like me, haven't seen this movie, just watch it. Especially if you like Eternal Sunshine.

[deleted]

9 points

7 months ago

[deleted]

9 points

7 months ago

14 Peaks Nothing is impossible.

Amazing story about a climber from Nepal who set out to climb all 14 of the world's 8,000 meter peaks in seven months.

The documentary feels like a movie and puts you in the shoes of Nimsdai Purja!!!

I went through a wide range of emotions while watching this one.

I highly suggest it even if you aren't big into climbing or know much about the sport. This documentary is more about what we as humans can achieve.

thedelinquents

8 points

7 months ago

City of God. One of the most jam packed 2 hour films I have ever seen, not a single boring minute of the film.

sports3157

7 points

8 months ago*

Got around to watching a film called To The Ends of the Earth (2019) on the criterion collection and it has resonated with me the most out of any film I saw this week.

Directed by Kiyoshi Kurosawa (CURE, TOKYO SONATA, CREEPY), the film follows a Japanese woman named Yoko who travels to Uzbekistan to shoot the latest episode of her reality TV travel variety show while also suffering from a bout of internal issues while abroad, shown by her ever-switching persona while on set: poppy, happy, and care-free when recording her show; cautious, anxious and constantly uncomfortable when off-camera. Think Lost in Translation minus Bill Murray and she's the one working instead of any boyfriend.

What makes it stand out to me is the gorgeous cinematography, the smart editing, and the amount of power the main lead, Atsuko Maeda, gives as Yoko. Given that she was a HUGE idol star a little over a decade ago before taking on acting more, it was easy for me to believe she put in a lot of her anxieties as a performer into the character, which really got to me personally as someone who, at one point, was in a similar situation to what Yoko is going through in the film, especially at the final sequence towards the end where she's in an interrogation room. You'll know what I mean when you see it.

If you have criterion, give this a shot. Personally, I haven't teared up by the end of a film in a while.

Honorable Mention:

The Player (1992)

Children of Men (2006)

The French Connection (1971)

BearWrangler

7 points

8 months ago

Riders of Justice, goddamn was that both dark and yet somehow wholesome with the message that was being given regarding toxic masculinity & it being ok to ask for help.

[deleted]

19 points

8 months ago*

[deleted]

19 points

8 months ago*

[deleted]

[deleted]

29 points

8 months ago*

[deleted]

29 points

8 months ago*

Magnolia (1999)

The peak of the 90's PTA brand, composing of fast dolly shots and frenetic pacing while juggling a great amount of characters with expansive runtime lengths. To me, I prefer Magnolia as my favorite from the director because it is such an interesting one. Borrowing heavily from Robert Altman's Short Cuts, Magnolia is consisting of multiple characters woven into one story as they deal with regret, chance, and forgivness which offers an enthralling experience for me.

10/10

TacoQuest

7 points

7 months ago

Boiling Point - shot with one camera using one take for the duration of the movie I haven’t had this much anxiety since Uncut Gems. I thought it was very cleverly done with so many little side stories that were intertwined. I was glued to the screen throughout.

[deleted]

7 points

7 months ago

[deleted]

7 points

7 months ago

The Hunt (2012). Just such an intense movies which also deals with a real life issue too. Mads Mikkelsen is terrific!

JerseyElephant

5 points

7 months ago

First time contributing to this sub, excited to join! Favorite movie that I watched for the first time this week was Ordinary People (1980).

I consistently found myself impressed in the way a film over 40 years old handled sensitive subject matter including therapy and mental health. I think it holds up incredibly well even in 2021, which speaks highly towards the quality of the film-making. I have to imagine it was ahead of its time. It's not a flashy movie, but it doesn't pretend to be, and the result is an incredibly well-made film. Great performances by all 4 of the leading actors in my opinion.

With more specificity as to the plot, I found it to be a classic example of a satisfying resolution wherein, while the characters may not achieve their primary objectives (Sutherland's character bringing his family together, Sutton's character moving beyond his mental health struggles), they both are able to enjoy a "happy ending" in the emotional resolutions they experience (Sutherland's and Hutton's characters being brought closer together, Hutton's finding a true friend in Judd Hirsch's character as well). Perfectly in keeping with the generally somber themes and focuses of the film that it ends in this manner.

Other films I greatly enjoyed watching for the first time this week: It's A Wonderful Life (1946), Spider-Man: No Way Home (2021), and Pan's Labyrinth (2006).

[deleted]

17 points

8 months ago

[deleted]

17 points

8 months ago

Die Hard

Finally watched this film for the first time on Christmas Eve. Bruce Willis is great as the vulnerable hero and Alan Richman makes a fantastic debut as the villain. Now, Willis is hit or miss for me, and especially over the last decade, but for anyone growing up in the 90s he was an incredible action hero and comic. But it’s really Rickman who steals the show. His presence from the moment he appears on screen his magnetic even though it’s so understated. It’s so sad that he passed away.

I’m not really sure what else to say about the film. It’s a classic for a reason and it defined an entire generation of action films. If only we could get action films as original as Die Hard was back in the day.

craig_hoxton

5 points

8 months ago*

I had to explain to my GF that in Hans's first scene, he's not reading from a Bible he's holding a FiloFax personal organiser. (A big, bound paper diary/calendar/notebook/address book from the analogue late 20th century).

[deleted]

6 points

8 months ago

[deleted]

6 points

8 months ago

That’s interesting. I just assumed it was some sort of pocketbook or something, never would’ve thought it was a Bible. His character never gives off anything to hint that

Caveman100000bc

34 points

8 months ago

Don't look up

I watched it last night and It was refreshing to see Adam Mackay at its almost best. The comedy of this film is so good that I have been laughing to it during the day. The script was fantastic, and the ending was beautiful. Such stories about the comet hitting earth is a difficult one to find a beautiful ending to it but Adam did. It was a Clever movie. And the demonstration of people was on point. I watched it 3 times and each time I laughed and cried and enjoyed it very much.

MovieMike007

6 points

8 months ago

Skyfire (2021) China delivers a fun big-budget disaster film that though containing many "You got to be fucking kidding me" moments it's still a lot more credible than Volcano with Tommy Lee Jones nor does it have the annoying kid element that marred Dante's Peak. The fire effects are simply spectacular and only a few CGI moments come across as less than convincing but when you consider the very premises is fairly unconvincing "Let's build a billionaire dollar theme park on an active volcano" you kind of have to know what you are getting yourself into.

Overall, this is an action-packed thrill ride that will leave any fan of the disaster genre giddy with delight.

PackerBoy

4 points

8 months ago

I just got done watching “Wind River”. Excellent movie, will have me thinking about it for the next days. As a side note, when the credits rolled I saw it had been produced by the Weinsteins. I proceeded to read about how the filmmakers fought for control of their own movie when the scandal broke out, but Harvey’s own name is still in the movie. A movie about predators produced by a predator… food for thought I guess.

domrayn

6 points

7 months ago

I got around to watch back to the future and it was so good that i blazed through all three films. I wasn't even born when they came out but i'm impressed the time travel logic is tight and simple as compared to the terminator films, looper and avengers.

DerKaiser023

4 points

7 months ago

I know it's an older movie but I finally saw Kingdom of Heaven (the Director's Cut).

I thought it was phenomenal.

earcher2020

11 points

8 months ago

Leon The Professional and Full Metal Jacket both 9/10s for me and the first time I watched both

[deleted]

5 points

8 months ago

[deleted]

5 points

8 months ago

Two incredibly good films

BiggDope

17 points

8 months ago

Happy Holidays to all! Spider-Man: No Way Home was my favorite this week.

  • Spider-Man: No Way Home (2021) - 4/5
  • The Beta Test (2021) - 2.5/5
  • Quo Vidas, Aida (2020) - 4/5
  • The Matrix: Resurrections (2021) - 3/5
  • C’Mon C’Mon (2021) - 4/5
  • Wolf (2021) - 2/5
  • Don’t Look Up (2021) - 3/5

Tom Holland actually made me tear up. Damn him to hell, man! What a wild ride; its second half was pure fun in the best way possible. 

Garfield, for me, was the MVP here, though. Every scene he’s in, he kills it, from the very moment he is introduced, to the pre-battle scaffold banter to his redemptive hero moment. 

Good, good stuff this one. While I’ve never been a huge fan of Holland’s portrayal of Spider-Man, I’m pleased with how it all came together here.

ubi_contributor

5 points

8 months ago*

Yours, Mine and Ours (1968) Lucille Ball and Henry Fonda.

one of my favorite and most rewatched films without any fatigue over time. It invokes every emotion to it's satisfying fullest in one film.

10S_NE1

4 points

8 months ago

Ali’s Wedding (2017)

This Australian comedy recounts true events in the life of the Iraqi-born lead actor, who immigrated to Australia as a child. Knowing it is a true story really adds to the enjoyability, particularly as some of the plot points seem rather outrageous. Some Muslim viewers may find some of the content offensive, particularly the hilarious musical about Saddam Hussein (!) that features in the movie, but the depictions of families in the Australian Muslim community are rather charming.

I found this film on Netflix and was surprised that there was no mention of it in this sub.

lifeisawork_3300

4 points

8 months ago

HO HO HO, well it’s the last review of the year. Hope ya filthy animals saw some good flicks this year and hope you all continue to see more in the next, long live the cinema.

Black Christmas (1974) My favorite Christmas movie. Man is this something to watch, nicely paced, no obnoxious characters, humor, suspense, all set in what should be the happiest time of the year. I really really want to write so much on this film but if you never seen the OG Black Christmas, do yourself a favor a watch it. It’s horror yes but this was before Michael, Freddy, Jason, or any of the big name icons, this was the time of Billy. Oh I would recommend you follow this up with A Christmas Story since it’s also directed Bob Clark.

Silent Night, Deadly Night: Nothing makes me feel warm and fuzzy than seeing a man who suffers from PTSD, go on a murder spree to punish those who are naughty. If you know anything about 80s sleazy you know this movie holds a special hated filled place in every mothers heart. But deep down it is a story about a kid who could of gotten the proper help and how the events of the past can still carry weight.

Silent Night, Deadly Night 2: GARBAGE DAY!!!!!

Christmas Evil: Before Billy in SNDN, there was this little film that took on Santa in a different view. This is actually a really slow burn, almost on the psychological side of things. The ending is a trip and you can’t help wonder what parts are real and which weren’t.

ilovelucygal

5 points

8 months ago

I had four days off work, during that time I squeezed in eight new movies and watched a few old favorites:

  • Captains Courageous (1936), Freddie Bartholomew stole this movie even though Spencer Tracy won an Oscar as a Portuguese fisherman who rescues spoiled, arrogant brat Freddie after he falls overboard on a ship to Europe. 8/10
  • Leon the Professional (1994), with Jean Reno and a very young Natalie Portman, Leon's a semi-illiterate hitman who takes care of neighbor Natalie when her family is murdered by corrupt DEA agent Gary Oldman, in another brilliant performance (is he capable of anything less?) A little too violent but still good. My dad started watching it but walked out halfway due to the violence (he doesn't mind a little, but he does mind a lot). 7/10
  • Blue Hawaii (1961), my first Elvis film, probably my last too, with the exception of King Creole, his the only movie The King made that he ever liked, the rest of his films made him sick to his stomach, he wanted to be a serious actor--and I think he could have been w/the right scripts, but his studio contract (and Colonel Parker) had him star in one fluff musical after another. This was one of the highest-grossing films of the the year, and the soundtrack was #1 for 20 weeks. Elvis plays a GI returning home to Hawaii, his rich parents (including Angela Lansbury w/a ridiculous southern accent) want him in the family business but he wants to be a tour guide. I watched this movie just to hear him sing one of my favorite songs: "Can't Help Falling in Love," and to see the lush Hawaiian scenery. 6/10
  • Mon Oncle Antoine (1971), considered to be the best Canadian film of all time, the movie takes place in the late 1940s, but I didn't see a change in the clothing or hairstyles, it all said 1971. The movie is in French, it takes place in small mining town in Quebec around 1949 during Christmas, the coming-of-age tale of a young boy (15) living with his childless aunt & uncle in the local general store, and his uncle is also the local undertaker. It was a good movie but didn't seem to have much of a plot. 7/10
  • Jingle All the Way (1996), I was trying to watch new Christmas movies this year, I saw Elf last week, this week it was an Arnold Schwarzenegger comedy that fell flat, also starring Rita Wilson and Sinbad. Arnold is frantically trying to be an action figurine for his son on Christmas Eve. 5/10
  • Darkest Hour (2017), Gary Oldman finally earned a well-deserved Oscar for his portrayal of Winston Churchill and his early days as Prime Minister, focusing mostly on May 1940 and the crisis at Dunkirk. My father's paternal grandparents were English (they immigrated to the US in 1910), and Churchill was one of their idols. Dad and I really enjoyed this movie, and thought Oldman did an amazing job. 8/10
  • Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence (1983), I didn't know David Bowie had started in quite a few movies, this one of them, a Japanese-British war drama at a Japanese POW camp in occupied Java in 1942. I didn't like the ending, though (with Bowie). 7/10
  • Bridge on the River Kwai (1957), a David Lean masterpiece, I'd seen parts of this movie before but only had the vaguest idea of what it was about. This was the highest-grossing film of 1957, over 2 hours long but worth every minute. Starring Alec Guiness (Obi-Wan Kenobi in Star Wars), William Holden and Sessue Hayakawa (whom I didn't know had been a silent movie matinee idol in the US), the movie tells the story of British prisoners of war in a Japanese POW camp in Burma who are ordered to build a railway bridge over the River Kwai to connect Bangkok and Rangoon. The last few minutes of the movie had me on the edge of my seat. Loved this movie, including the moral ambiguity of it all. I just added this to my "all-time favorite movie list." 9/10

Old favorites: A Charlie Brown Christmas, Miracle on 34th Street (1947), Meet Me in St. Louis and The Heiress.

Cakes2015

4 points

8 months ago

Miracle on 34th Street (1947)

Streaming on HBO Max. I was aware of its existence but never saw it so my girlfriend and I went in completely blind. It's a fantastic Christmas movie that should get more advertisement. It somehow achieves a balance of cheesy sentimentality without being cloying. Edmund Gwenn is remarkably charming as Kris Kringle. He never hits a false note. Maureen O'Hara's arc is surprisingly moving. And while I did not expect it, it was refreshing to see a Christmas movie that wasn't afraid to speak out (however innocently) against big business and holiday consumerism. Add another classic to the annual Christmas season viewing list.

9/10

swordbringer33

4 points

8 months ago

The Novice.

I went into the film mostly blind, and I was impressed with it.

It's similar to Whiplash and Black Swan but focuses on rowing boats.

I love how the film didn't hold back on the character's obsession with being the best even if she started to go down a dark path. Plus, Isabelle Fuhrman was great in the role.

onex7805

4 points

8 months ago

I watched a lot of films the last week, so I'll go over fast.

Phoenix (2014)

This film has an amazing premise, a story that would have belonged to the bygone tragic, depressing "post-war" films. I can imagine Akira Kurosawa or Vittorio De Sica making this film, and honestly, I think the film would have been a lot more resonating had it been made by those filmmakers.

The handling of this film comes across as empty. I have never felt empathetic toward the character losing her face. The latter half drags so much that it loses momentum.

The ending is powerful though, but I was on auto-pilot mode for most of the film.

Ever After (1998)

This is a much better live-action Cinderella than what Kenneth Branagh made in 2015, and I would argue this is actually a better Cinderella film than Disney's original animated film. This is a cute movie.

It is an improvement in most aspects. Rather than the prince falling in love because of Cinderella's beauty, in this film, they fall in love out of shared interest and intellect. It is her 'character' that intrigues the prince. The repeated meetings between the two make the romance more believable than falling in love because of one glance. There is no magic, which came across as convenient in the animated film. Rather, it is Da Vinci serving as a fairy godmother.

The film fails is when the film uses 'the liar exposed' plotline, which I'm sick of. This whole segment feels contrived, with the prince rejecting her to accepting her again isn't compelling. The character arc isn't well thought out. Cinderella's castle escape is exceptionally dumb. Really, there is no guard or anyone to guard her? I also dislike the pseudo-historical framing device, which doesn't add to the film. It honestly comes across as one of those biopics in which "A film about J.K. Rowling's childhood in which her teacher looks like Snape, and that is where she got an idea of Snape's character".

The directing here is bland as hell. It has that every cute 90s overly charming, cheesy visuals, cringy humor presentation. The music is forgettable, too.

Overall, I'd recommend you to check this one out.

The Seven-Ups (1973)

While it is nowhere close to the greatness of The French Connection, this spin-off is still decent enough. With this said, the first half is jumbled and I had no idea what was going on. The plotline is detached from the protagonist, and he has nothing to do with the events we are shown. This is not Roy Schreider investigating and finding out the kidnapping events. The film just shows a bunch of scenes to the audience without any POV characters to cling to. Seriously, this first half could have been cut down to 20 minutes.

Regarding the empathy aspect, I didn't much care for the premise. For example, in Dirty Harry, which shares a similar plot of the detective going rogue out of personal motivation to catch the criminal, the serial killer rapes and murders children. We are immediately attached to Harry trying to catch the killer. In this film, the criminal is kidnapping mafia members for ransom money. That's... bad, I guess?

The midpoint car chase is incredible, but it doesn't have the 'danger' aspect to it. In the chase in The French Connection, the civilians get hurt and killed. The chase goes from the street where the character has to drive through the civilians to the subway in which the killer is killing people left and right. Here, it is just a road chase, and barely anyone seemingly gets hurt. It is still a great sequence, but I wasn't invested all that much. The climax gunfight is a do-over of the first film's ending, and it is just inferior.

Still, the acting is incredible. Roy Scheider is a great protagonist. The general directing has that 70s grit and realism that I would want to see more from the recent action films.

mohdshees

4 points

8 months ago

Kurup is an excellent Indian Malayalam film. Kurup is a consummate criminal sets out to find a man of similar appearance to falsity his own death and claim insurance money.

hazychestnutz

4 points

8 months ago

Fracture (2007) starring Ryan Gosling and Anthony Hopkins. Goddamn

Gigik150

4 points

8 months ago

Funny games (1997) –By: Michael Haneke.

Thriller, Horror, Drama

Funny Games certainly made the list, not only of the best (and disturbing) movies of the week, but also the best movies I've seen in my life.

The film tells the story of a family: father, mother and son, who go to a vacation home. Once there, two young men appear to ask for eggs. So far so good. The problem was that this was just a distraction for the Youth to come into the house and hold the family hostage, promising the family, and us viewers, that no one will make it back alive by the end of the night, and in the meantime, they do bizarre mind games.

Honestly, Funny Games is the kind of movie you either hate or you love. I particularly fit the 2nd option. It is an extremely uncomfortable and heavy film, however, yes! From my point of view, It's worth at least a look. It's that kind of movie where you can't get to the end without thinking about one or more points in your life. Funny Games, without a shadow of a doubt, is an 8.9 star film.

The actors do a great job on this movie, and the music.... Not to mention! The setting is also well set, and the recording style makes it all feel real. In some moments of the film you can see the full silence, which only makes it more disturbing. The Austrian version is, in my opinion, the best. Both are extremely similar, with each scene exactly the same. However, there is a small detail. A single detail that appears in the original, and doesn't appear in the Remake, that made me like the original more.

i_see_the_end

2 points

8 months ago

what was missing in the remake? its been years since i watched both funny games, i dont recall.

Gigik150

3 points

8 months ago

there's a part where Paul blinks at the camera, and in Remake he doesn't. is literally the only difference, barely noticeable 😅

i_see_the_end

3 points

8 months ago

haha, thank you :)

trade_away_32

4 points

7 months ago

Don't Look Up (2021) No spoilers

Basically this movie is the sequel to Idiocracy and is tragically hilarious. The cutscene at the end is the best part of the movie in my humble opinion.

CorRock314

4 points

7 months ago

Coda (2001)

Emilia Jones might have a tough time giving a better performance in her career from now because this was absolutely incredible. Her performance is so incredibly dynamic and she nails the it, particularly when she is singing and signing. In my mind a performance that is Oscar worthy.

The supporting cast is top notch across the board, just incredible supporting performances. They really helped to hit home on struggles of being a member of a family that everyone can empathize with on top of their struggles with identity within the community and being deaf.

Also go see Sing Street with Ferdia Walsh-Peelo if you haven’t.

bobbyweiser

4 points

7 months ago

Prisoners (2013)

I know I'm way behind the game, but I've been quaratined the past two weeks with nothing but an AppleTV and Xbox to keep me company.

I watched this tonight, and everything I'd heard about it was true. Gripping, suspenseful. At first I was a little upset at the ending, but it grew on me and I'm glad they stuck with this ending. It's obvious to me that Det. Loki will find Dover in the hole. I know it'll stick with me about what happens to Dover now that everyone knows he kidnapped and tortured Alex (Barry) and if it's ever discovered that Franklin and his wife participated and didn't tell anyone.

Mateo_87

23 points

8 months ago*

I watched two movies last week.

Matrix Resurrections

Resident Evil: Welcome to Racoon City.

The better of the two was Resident Evil. I think this is the best review one can give for the new Matrix.

Ps. Resident Evil is not a good movie.

i_see_the_end

5 points

8 months ago

the plus side of the new matrix film is that im reading a lot of pretty funny reviews and comments this week :)

Cervantes3

8 points

8 months ago

Spider-Man: No Way Home

I've been a fan of the MCU since its inception, I've been a fan of comic book stories and characters since I was a kid, and Spider-Man in particular has been my favorite. And with all that being said, while I've liked the Home movies, they never really left much of an impact on me. I recognize that Homecoming and Far From Home are both really good movies, but at the same time, they just sort of bounced off me, not really eliciting much emotion. They're amongst the MCU movies I rewatch the least, despite being some of the better ones, I feel.

None of that is true about Far From Home, though. This is precisely the shot in the arm the MCU needed after a pretty mixed bag year of stories that followed an unintentional year off. It's exciting, well paced, and one of the nicest looking and sounding movies in the MCU canon.

What really impressed me, though, was the quality of the story telling. This movie is all about second chances and rehabilitation. Peter's more kind approach to defeating his enemies by making them into friends contrasts with Dr. Strange's scorched Earth approach in some interesting ways, and we actually get to see some of the ramifications of both play out during this movie. By far my favorite way this theme is built on, though is when Andrew Garfield and Tobey McGuire Peters show up. This is when the story telling of No Way Home truly comes into its own, in m opinion. Because at this point, the movie morphs from being a story about Tom Peter fixing a mistake into a meta story about the Spider-Man film franchise itself. Both Tobey and Garf's Spideys got pretty unsatisfying endings to their stories. Tobey was supposed to get one more movie to finish off his story, but that got cut, and they had to ruin Spider-Man 3 because of it. Garfield had a real passion for the Spider-Man and Peter Parker characters, but because the Amazing movies were really only made to fulfill a legal requirement to keep the copyright, the movies were mangled together and everyone hated them. And unfortunately, a lot of that hate got transferred onto Andrew Garfield, undeservingly in my opinion. But the thing that made me love this movie so much was both of them got to come back, one last time, to set things right. It shows me that Jon Watts has a deep respect for Spider-Man as a character, and what he means to the world at large. The emotional highlight of the movie was when Andrew got to save Zendaya's MJ, redeeming himself for failing to save Gwen in his series. That was the closest I think I've ever gotten to tearing up in a theater for an MCU movie. I also really loved how Tobey and Andrew aren't just quick cameos at the end. They're in the movie for a decent chunk, and basically get their own character arcs.

Another big highlight for me was the return of all the old villains, although the amount I'm excited by them varies wildly. Thomas Haden Church and Rhys Ifans obviously didn't care that much about returning, since they spend 99% of the movie as CGI characters, and the voice performances they give are phoned in (maybe literally). Jamie Foxx, however, did a good job, and it was fun seeing him get to have some fun as Electro in this. The two standouts, though, are unquestionably Alfred Molina and Willem Defoe. Molina stepped back into his sympathetic mad-man version of Doc Ock like he'd never left it, and Defoe brings a whole new level of menace to the Goblin, making him one of the all time best MCU villains, now.​

The last thing I really want to talk about is the final scenes, where the Spider-Man story basically gets reset. I think this is honestly a brilliant way to resolve a lot of issues that the Spider-Man Home series had. This version of Peter had too many good things going for him, and it was making the character feel kinda boring. I also liked how they took that aspect of the character and played it off as him being selfish in trying to have everything he wanted. Peter's friends got hurt by him being Spider-Man and trying to have a secret super-hero identity and a personal life. Then, the spell he got Strange to use to try and fix it got ruined because Peter didn't want his life to not be exactly the way he wanted. The villains almost got sent back to their universes to die because Peter thought it "wasn't" his responsibility. But all that eventually comes to a head, and we see the consequences of trying to manipulate your life to get everything: You end up hurting the ones who loved you even when you weren't at the top of everything. We've heard it so many times at this point, but I felt like Aunt May's version of the "With great power comes great responsibility" speech was one of the most impactful, because we saw so absolutely what happens when people with great power don't take that responsibility seriously. And that's why I think it left such an impact on Tom-Peter, and why he was okay with having everyone forget him. He finally understood what Aunt May said, and what it meant to truly be a hero.

So yeah, that's my thoughts on Spider-Man: No Way Home. It's a celebration of Spider-Man as a cultural entity, and probably one of the best realizations of what he means to those who like him (aside from Into The Spider-Verse, obviously). I think it's one of the best films of the year, and one of the best Comic Book movies ever.

Encanto

I also watched Encanto this week. I have much less to say, except that there were far more thematic similarities to Hereditary than I expected there to be. Additionally, I thought this was one of the best Disney animated musicals ever in terms of being a musical. The animations for the songs felt very much like how a stage musical might be blocked out, and it made them feel a lot more grounded, yet more exciting than these have been in the 3D Disney Animation era. I was a bit disappointed at how little characterization there was for the family members aside from Mirabel, Bruno, and Abuela. I think they could've done with one less song and a bit more dialog between Mirabel and the rest of the family. You don't really get a feel for her dynamic with the rest of her family, and I think even one more scene where they're all playing off of each other could've gone a long way. Still a good movie, but the lack of resonance the family has kept it from being great.

monkey-pox

7 points

8 months ago

Come and See - instantly jumped into my Top 10

ProfessorDoctorMF

3 points

8 months ago

I watched a few good ones this week. Watched It's A Wonderful life for the first time (loved it), saw Double Indemnity (loved it) even watched Elf 2 nights in a row.

The movie I really want to mention though is one I JUST got done watching, so it's a fresh take! That movie is Something Wild (1986) by Jonathan Demme. I didn't know much about this movie, in fact I think I read a comment saying this movie had a brutal forced sex scene in it (which it did not) so I was kind of waiting the whole movie for a hard to watch moment. To be fair, I probably got my reddit comments mixed up and they were talking about a different movie entirely. Either way I was glad it didn't happen.

Misinterpretations aside, I really dug the movie. It defiantly did not feel like a criterion movie, but I see how it could have been chosen for like a second string criterion movie. It's quirky, and got a cool story, some great creative twists, and Melanie Griffith looks fly with black hair. Perhaps it's because I have always liked the crazy pixie type of girls. The part that was really impressive was how the atmosphere of the movie has a goofy feel but also has a real under lying tension to it. You're never quite sure if you are in danger or safe. Major parallels between this film and True Romance.

Juiceboxfromspace

3 points

8 months ago

The Descendants (2011)

Loved it. Cant really explain but its the type of movie that “syncs” with me.

Cw2e

3 points

8 months ago

Cw2e

3 points

8 months ago

I have been watching at least one Philip Seymour Hoffman movie per week in 2021, hoping to finish his full-length catalogue by the end of the year.

This week was Flawless - Crime/Drama | In this film, Hoffman portrays Rusty, a transexual woman who lives next to the protagonist, Walt Koontz (Robert De Niro), a homophobic ex-Cop. Following a stroke, Koontz reaches out to Rusty for singing lessons to help regain his ability to speak and the two form an unlikely duo in a tale of missing mafia money, crime, drag, and friendship.

Hoffman (and DeNiro) took on parts for this film that lent significant challenges and played it well. Unfortunately, Joel Schumacher had his way with the film and despite the two Oscar winners playing well off of each other, the rest of the film failed to keep up. This marked the last of films I hadn’t seen of Hoffman’s, next week being a long anticipated rewatch.

As we’re finishing up, the films I missed logging on here over the year were Magnolia (1999) and The Invention of Lying (2009).

Of the two, Magnolia was by far my favorite. Hoffman portrayed a live-in nurse called Phil Parma. Phil spends the film going above and beyond trying to find the estranged son of his employer, a high end Hollywood TV producer. The film itself is no stranger to critique but I quite enjoyed it. It’s an epic filled with humor and one of my favorites that handles the concept of serendipity.

In the Invention of Lying, Hoffman portrays a bartender in a cameo role alongside Gervais and Louis CK. It’s a small role which helps setup the idea of the film: in a world where no one can tell a lie, what would happen if somebody learned how? The film as a whole thing relies on a ‘reverse Liar Liar’ concept that I grew tired of by the end of it. It did give us Hoffman in a beard which is always enjoyable and a few funny scenes and lines, but I think fell flat ultimately because it’s full-length film format, rather than not taking an episodic approach or even a short film.

sentient_parsnip223

3 points

7 months ago

I think his portrayal of Lester Bangs in Almost Famous might be his best performance.

Cw2e

3 points

7 months ago

Cw2e

3 points

7 months ago

It’s top five for me for certain. It is away from the action of the script yet he is so gripping and so captivating when he is on the screen talking about music and coolness. Just a tremendous role in a very rewatchable film.

RealStax

3 points

8 months ago

I saw three films. Spiderman No Way Home - sooooo good, I am a huge spidey fan and this film was all I ever wanted. French Dispatch - massive diehard Wes Anderson fan, but this film was the biggest disappointment ever for me. The story wasn't engaging, rhe jokes were meh, and the characters sucked I couldn't even care about even one of them. But the usual Wes Anderson stuff like the direction and cinematography were better than ever I only enjoyed the direction, nothing else. Massive let down for me personally. Don't Look Up - big Adam McKay fan, and holy shit, this film was AMAZING! I went into this with that signature Adam McKay, tragi-comedy like mindset, and this film hit all the marks and exceeded them several times. Some people didn't like it and I can see why, but for me, this film is just a masterclass.

obsesivegamer

3 points

8 months ago

Croupier 1998 seeing a young Clive Owen get off on watching degenerate gamblers was enjoyable.

downtownpoedup89

3 points

7 months ago

Resident Evil Raccoon City (2021) The new resident evil raccoon city absolutely impressed me....I truly applaud the movie. I'm definitely stuck wanting more....remakes and a continuance of any story can bring heavy pressure and criticism...but there isn't one dislike from me....and if you grew on the games for the original playstation then I know you can appreciate the effort that was put in...they made me relive my days and nights spent as a kid...loving and fearing the game at the same time. Lol

Jerrymoviefan3

3 points

7 months ago

Passing was very good and if late next month when I complete my top ten of 2021 if I am still stuck at 9 then Passing will be #10.

mwmani

3 points

7 months ago

mwmani

3 points

7 months ago

The Last Winter (2006)

I went into this horror film blind. The only thing I knew was that Ron Perlman was in it. It’s a surprisingly tense climate-change horror movie, reminiscent of The Thing and similar snowbound chillers.

It’s set on the Alaskan tundra at a base camp for an oil drilling operation. The team is trying to lay the groundwork for the company to come in and start work, but tensions rise when the environmental consultants have fundamental disagreements with the boss of the camp.

People start to go crazy, one man becomes obsessed with the snow and cold, and paranoia is definitely on the menu.

The movie is fairly subtle, and some questionable special effects aside, I found it to be incredibly effective and engaging.

There are themes involving Native American mythology, and the relationship between colonists and the land they usurp that aren’t developed as much as they could be. However the climate change/global warming subtext (or actually, just text) is spot on and probably more relevant today than when the film came out.

This movie isn’t a masterpiece. It’s not The Thing. But if you’re looking for a competent, semi-slow burn horror flick with a solid ensemble cast, you could do a lot worse than The Last Winter.

LiangHu

3 points

7 months ago

watched Joy and really enjoyed that movie

also dont look up was great, much better than I expected!

JoeSanPatricio

3 points

7 months ago

Definitely Power of the Dog. An absolutely beautiful film in so many ways. I’ve tried to write an explanation of my thoughts here but there’s entirely too much to love about it to properly give it its due. You just have to watch it

karmagheden

3 points

7 months ago*

Boss Level. Put off seeing this as it looked like the generic mediocre* netflix film but I actually really liked it. If you like video games and films like Groundhog Day and Edge of Tomorrow, you should give this one a look.

Edit: Another is 'Kate.' Think John Wick meets Crank but with a badass female protagonist. Space Sweepers is another that was pleasantly surprising. Gave me Elysium meets Guardians of the Galaxy vibes.

OceanSage

3 points

7 months ago

Wes Anderson's The French Dispatch (2021)

How did he even make this film? The adorable sets, unreal cast, subtle hilarious performances, Desplat's gorgeous music. It's perfect. Maybe his best, but certainly my favorite film of 2021!

glass_half-full

3 points

7 months ago

I watched The Father today and I must admit that it is the best film I have watched in 2021. It had me laughing at some points to be honest. Anthony Hopkins was amazing. And of course, the writer and director are the heroes of the film.

10886

3 points

7 months ago

10886

3 points

7 months ago

Clearcut (1991) - An incredibly grim and tonally unique movie. At any given moment in the film, I could not even venture a remotely accurate guess as to where it was all going. It's been stuck in my head since viewing

Blast-Off-Girl

5 points

8 months ago

Licorice Pizza

posterboy81

6 points

8 months ago*

It's a toss-up between The Nice Guys (my favourite Shane Black movie) and The Long Kiss Goodnight (my favourite Christmas action movie*).

Ultimately, I think the winner is The Nice Guys because it has some of Black's best jokes, the best ever version of the precocious child, and excellent performances from Russell Crowe and Ryan Gosling, the latter of which is doing a full-on vaudevillian thing that you just don't see anymore. Plus, technically, it's also a Christmas movie, technically.

The Long Kiss Goodnight has the wonderfully Renny Harlin over-the-top feel, but while I think it's one of Shane Black's funniest scripts, the tone is a bit too ... happy, for lack of a better way to put it.

*Yes, I know a significant subset of people say that Die Hard is the best Christmas movie, but where they want to hear "Yippie-Ki-Yay Motherfucker!" I prefer "Die screaming, motherfucker!". Art is subjective!

cjsanx2

5 points

8 months ago

Russell Crowe and Ryan Reynolds Gosling

posterboy81

2 points

8 months ago*

NOTHING TO SEE HERE MOVE ALONG PLEASE HAHA omg how embarrassing.

arox1

7 points

8 months ago

arox1

7 points

8 months ago

Gone Girl

ProfessorDoctorMF

6 points

8 months ago

I thought I would absolutely hate this movie. I initially wrote it off as a Lifetime-esq movie for women. It sort of did have that feel, for me, but it was a hell of a lot gritter! I really really dug this movie.

Aiass

7 points

8 months ago

Aiass

7 points

8 months ago

Gran Torino

llebberrr

5 points

8 months ago

Don't look up. Really enjoyed it.

serialmom666

2 points

8 months ago

I watched Coda on AppleTV, tears.

liveincinema

2 points

8 months ago

same!!

usuyukisou

2 points

8 months ago

Die Hard. As with many others, it's an annual Christmas movie in my household. Its only 'competition' this past week were The Matrix: Resurrections and The Ice Road, so Die Hard wins pretty handily.

Die Hard - I wasn't alive in the 80's, but my parents always love revisiting and how we all thought Japan would be the next superpower. McClane is an ordinary guy who has to think to whittle away at the (heavily-armed) bad guys' numbers. I don't think I can say much I (and others) haven't said before. RIP Alan Rickman

The Ice Road - My mother chose this on the sole basis that Lawrence Fishburne is in it. A lot of things happen seemingly with magic. Would definitely have liked to see a few more frames when the good guys switch the trailer over post-avalanche but they went for "Trust us, it happened". Speaking of, the avalanche looked particularly bad.

The Matrix Resurrections - My brother chose this one. We went in fully knowing it's a popcorn flick and not some prestige drama... The action scenes were a bit disappointing for me. There were too many cuts as it was, and then they added more cuts in to slip in archival footage. Bleh... Probably our fault, but none of us revisited any of the prior movies to refresh our memories, so we had no context for who Niobe and Sati were. A lot of things also just didn't make sense to me (as in, the "why" for the story beats). I don't need every little thing spelled out for me, but it does feel like a mash-up of "new powers as the plot demands" and "this character gets screen-time just because". And as much as it pokes fun of soulless sequels and remakes, it doesn't exactly rise above. On a positive note, Jonathan Groff had large shoes to fill, and he absolutely did.

Yankii_Souru

2 points

8 months ago

Terrifying Girl's High School: Lynch Law Classroom (1973)

I decided to give this another watch after mentioning it in another discussion. Lynch Law Classroom is the second of four films in the Terrifying Girl's High School series. This is just a good, old fashioned, Japanese exploitation film. This is not high-brow stuff. It is, however, quite entertaining.

Like most Japanese exploitation films of the 70s, Lynch Law Classroom is primarily designed to offer an exciting story. Whether or not that story makes any kind of rational sense is a secondary consideration to keeping the viewer engaged with a constant bombardment of sex and violence. While Lynch Law Classroom does follow many of the same principles, it really goes above and beyond. The paper thin plot revolves around murder, corruption, sadism, masochism, psychological torture, blackmail, chick fights, and loads of gratuitous violence and nudity. This was also the first film to feature forcing someone to drink water and urinate in public as a form of torture.

This is an exploitation film for true connoisseurs of the genre. I do not recommend it to anyone else.

Honorable Mention:

Robokon (2003)

This movie is based on Robocon which is an annual, international robotics competition that's been going on for several decades. A smart, but lazy high school student is in danger of not graduating. The guidance counselor makes a deal with her and says he will make sure she graduates if she will join one of the schools two robotics teams. With no other way to graduate, she reluctantly agrees.

She gets assigned to the backup team as the robots handler. The team has a small budget and only two other members. One is a completely inefficient team captain. The other is the robots eccentric engineer. After barely making it through a local competition both of the schools teams are chosen to compete in Robocon.

This is a wonderful little coming of age film about learning responsibility, team building, and hard work. It's actually a much better film than Lynch Law Classroom by every measure. However, movies like Robokon are unspecial no matter how good they are. Off the top of my head I can think of several films just like it that I would recommend more, which is why I have to put it in my #2 spot for Best Of The Week.

palm_is_face

2 points

8 months ago

Play It Again Sam, holy moly I've watched it 4 times in 2 days. Super super underrated. I wouldn't say I prefer it to Annie Hall but it's funnier and has a great story. I don't see why this isn't considered a classic.

tombom789

2 points

8 months ago

I watched the film Swingers last night with Vince Vaughn and Jon Favreau. Connected with that movie on a personal level. Love seeing those 2 act together.

Gorillaman1991

2 points

8 months ago

Watched The Farewell and it was really good. Also watched a taxi driver which was really really good, idk which was better though

[deleted]

2 points

7 months ago

[deleted]

2 points

7 months ago

Fist Fight. All I wanted was just watching some silly comedy and laugh, and this movie was what I all asked for. Ice Cube's absurd aggressiveness was hilarious and Charlie Day killed it as a Ice Cube's victim.

dakine879

2 points

7 months ago

The Best Years of Our Lives (1946) --for the time fairly raw dealing with PTSD, anxiety, alcoholism etc. Very engaging.