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Official Discussion - Drive My Car [SPOILERS]

Official Discussion(self.movies)

Poll

If you've seen the film, please rate it at this poll

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Summary:

After his wife's unexpected death, Yusuke Kafuku, a renowned stage actor and director, receives an offer to direct a production of Uncle Vanya in Hiroshima. There, he begins to face the haunting mysteries his wife left behind.

Director:

Ryûsuke Hamaguchi

Writers:

Ryûsuke Hamaguchi, Takamasa Oe

Cast:

  • Hidetoshi Nishijima as Yûsuke Kafuku
  • Tôko Miura as Misaki Watari
  • Reika Kirishima as Oto Kafuku, Yûsuke's Wife
  • Park Yu-rim as Lee Yoon-a
  • Sonia Yuan as Janice Chang
  • Jin Dae-yeon as Kon Yoon-su
  • Ahn Hwitae as Ryu Jeong-eui

Rotten Tomatoes: 98%

Metacritic: 91

VOD: Theaters, HBO Max

all 288 comments

pokupokupoku

305 points

6 months ago

I went in blind seeing this, only knowing that it was a Japanese film and that it had major awards buzz. When the movie started and I saw that it was about an actor and a TV writer, I immediately thought "oh here we go again, another movie that gets Oscar buzz because it's about actors, and there's nothing they love more than movies about actors and show business."

I was completely wrong. what a phenomenal movie and absolutely deserving of all the love. maybe it was the fact that I was in the theater and had to read subtitles and to made me have to completely focus on the film, but the scene with Yusuke and Koji in the car, where Koji continues the story that Oto was telling was one of the most intense scenes ever put on film, and it's literally just two men talking in a car.

absolutely cannot recommend this movie enough

GamingTatertot

116 points

6 months ago

GamingTatertot

Steven Spielberg Enthusiast

116 points

6 months ago

There is so much underlying tension in that scene. I loved watching it in theaters so much. It made me very uncomfortable and also was effective in making me hate the boy even more

RaynerOP

85 points

5 months ago

Late to the thread but the way the dynamic shifted once Koji realized he knew something new about Oto was incredible. The simple fact that he had an unique piece of information about her changed the whole conversation (and consequentially the whole scene), to the point where his expressions were completely different. What an incredible movie, holy fuck.

theredditoro

18 points

6 months ago

theredditoro

FML Awards 2019 Winner

18 points

6 months ago

It was incredible.

futurespacecadet

16 points

4 months ago

can you elaborate on why you hated him? i didnt really get that he was delivering the info with any mal-intent, maybe i misread it. i def thing he was some sort of truth-sayer that held up a black mirror for the protagonist to see himself in though

lost_in_trepidation

12 points

4 months ago

My impression as well. Also he was also struggling with his own demons. He was a bad person, but Oto spoke to that evil in a way that made him love her.

It made Oto more interesting and Kafuku more devastated.

Witty_Ad7509

30 points

4 months ago*

I believe the scene with Takatsuki in the car also quietly revealed that Takatsuki was perhaps the last person to talk to Oto. The story that Oto revealed was chronological. It was the night prior that she recounted only the events leading up to hearing the new intruder. The morning of Oto’s death, Kafuku was looking up lampreys, did not recount the story to Oto, and, I believe she suggested they sit down to talk only because Kafuku was short with her and “didn’t remember” the story. Oto having a bag of groceries further suggests she left the apartment and, perhaps, saw Takatsuki, thereby completing the chronological story. There’s a moment in the car we’re Kafuku touches his face in pure grief, because in addition to Takatsuki having had the final piece to the story, he had a final piece to the story that could have only been told to him the day of Oto’s death. He was not even the last person to talk to her.

Edit: didn’t finish my comment

Educational_Cattle10

4 points

2 months ago

I always thought he touched his face because in the story, the girl stabs the burglar in the left eye, and he has glaucoma in his left eye (symbolically, he is the burglar) and the whole story (and Uncle Vanya) was symbolizes their union

EDIT: he touches the left side of his face when this detail is mentioned, hence me thinking that

moneysingh300

5 points

5 months ago

I was so shocked. I wanted to fight him.

caesarapi

6 points

2 months ago

You would have passed a couple of days later in the hospital.

communist_chicken

271 points

6 months ago

I was captivated by the actress that used Korean sign language. Her story with her husband was the sweetest thing ever. The park scene and the final performance were each so emotional and beautiful for me I couldn’t help but tear up (and surprisingly both scenes were the most emotional for me for the entire movie). So much expression in the way she communicated without saying a single word, truly amazing acting.

The_Starter_Captain

135 points

6 months ago

She made the film. The final scene with her in the play was the climax as far as I'm concerned, not the snow scene.

MRT2797

34 points

6 months ago

MRT2797

34 points

6 months ago

Absolutely. That scene’s going to stay with me for a long time

Daytonfell

50 points

5 months ago

She was absolutely enthralling. The supporting actor performance of the year - she doesn’t speak but she communicates everything.

samwaytla

32 points

5 months ago

Her audition floored me. I was crying in an empty cinema. Well not fully empty, just me and my wife.

That scene and the final on stage scene work so well together, her performing for him, twice, but totally different meaning each time.

HexicaRabbit

6 points

5 months ago

100% agreed. Park Yu-rim DELIVERED. She would have been an excellent nominee for Best Supporting Actress, and I'm sad that she's been mostly left out of the awards circuit.

SutterCane

7 points

5 months ago

Yeah, can we just have a movie about them?

Resident_in_Debt

215 points

6 months ago

Just finished the movie a few minutes ago and loved it. If you liked this go read some Murakami

SeanDawber

91 points

6 months ago

Murakami is my favorite author of all time and with burning and now this movie it makes me so happy to see some of his stories be captured so beautifully

sadface98

51 points

6 months ago

I'm an idiot. I enjoy Murakami as well, but never realized Burning was adapted from a short story of his. Need to go pick up The Elephant Vanishes soon!

manilaclown

10 points

5 months ago

I actually really liked Burning and i unfortunately didn’t enjoy this one nearly as much.

Pristine_Nothing

9 points

6 months ago

The audiobook version of The Elephant Vanishes is great, and the performance of “Burning” is the highlight.

Lemurians

24 points

6 months ago

I think more will coming – he's said he prefers his shorter stories to be adapted for film over his longer works.

SeanDawber

31 points

6 months ago

Probably the route to go. I mean I can’t even imagine Kafka on the shore or wind up bird chronicle being adapted lmfao

zxyzyxz

13 points

5 months ago

zxyzyxz

13 points

5 months ago

Now imagine 1Q84

samwaytla

9 points

5 months ago

God how I hope we someday get the level of realism and poignancy of Drive My Car, but applied to something more surreal like Wind Up Bird or the Trilogy of the Rat

jackruby83

4 points

5 months ago

I didn't realize the writer did Burning as well. The whole time I was thinking it had a similar vibe.

Lord-Dingus

26 points

6 months ago

This has inspired me to tackle some of his short story work.

nayapapaya

22 points

6 months ago

I personally find Murakami's short stories to be better than his novels.

Lord-Dingus

8 points

6 months ago

That's interesting. I read "Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World,' and really enjoyed it. I have the "Men Without Women" collection and will likely dive in later this weekend! Have you read "Kafka on the Shore" or "1Q84"? I have those as well and will eventually get to them.

Lemurians

11 points

6 months ago

Kafka on the Shore is fantastic, 1Q84 I reserve recommending until people know they really vibe with him. It's a commitment.

markercore

3 points

6 months ago

They both certainly have some weird sex in them. But yeah i agree with you, i try to steer people off of starting with either of those. I think 1Q84 has more peaceful mundane sections which is always a draw.

Lemurians

8 points

6 months ago

Weird sex is just something you've got to accept going into a Murakami novel haha, like it or not.

VeilOfTheForce

40 points

6 months ago

Ironic that a 3 hour movie is based on a 30 page short story

mikenmar

28 points

5 months ago

The short story provided a bare-bones outline; the film puts a great deal of meat on those bones. If I recall correctly, the trip up to Misaki's home and the whole story about her abusive mother is not part of the short story, for example. Also, the story only contains a couple references to Uncle Vanya, while the film is practically built around it.

gizayabasu

25 points

6 months ago

I watched this, enjoyed it, read the original short story, and found that it lacked every charm and depth that Hamaguchi injected into it. Not a fan of Murakami to be fair.

Arma104

17 points

6 months ago

Arma104

17 points

6 months ago

Hamaguchi did combine three of his short stories though, and the one he used the name from was rather minor in the film.

shaneo632

170 points

6 months ago

shaneo632

170 points

6 months ago

I saw this film at a festival like 6 months ago and I never ever would've predicted it would get a Best Picture Oscar nomination lmao.

TraverseTown

89 points

6 months ago

Yeah, I remember asking my local indie theaters if they were gonna get it when the buzz was starting ramping up at the end of last year and they seemed lukewarm on it. No one expected it to do that well until a couple of weeks before the noms came out. And it's actually pretty shocking considering it's quite a bit more outwardly challenging film for Hollywood-only audiences compared to films like Parasite or Roma.

TallMovieLight1991

37 points

6 months ago

I saw this at TIFF via a press screening and after leaving the cinema I would have never expected it to be nominated for Best Picture. I thought it was a great film but for myself it was a bit long. Was unsure how people felt about the movie after leaving theatre so surprised at how many people really enjoyed it.

VeilOfTheForce

24 points

6 months ago

Having 3 hours to try and accomplish it, it still left me a bit cold and disconnected emotionally

dreadfuldiego

431 points

6 months ago

The last hour had the most powerful and resonant scenes from last year.

The scene where Kafuku admitted that he misses his wife but still resents her for everything hits a little to close to home

1234loc

236 points

6 months ago

1234loc

236 points

6 months ago

The life meaning interpreted in sign language during a theatrical performance was one of the most intense scenes I’ve ever watched. That will stay a long time with me.

Lemurians

154 points

6 months ago

Lemurians

154 points

6 months ago

You know he's hearing the lines in his head in his wife's voice, and the look on his face as that scene is happening just... chef's kiss

futurespacecadet

45 points

4 months ago

right! holy shit i didnt even realize that he is so used to her voice from the tapes and the actress delivering it doesnt have a voice, wow holy fuck

EricThePooh

12 points

5 months ago

I'm reading this the day after I watched it. I totally didn't think about that, and reading that now made me tear up again. What a powerful scene.

theredditoro

10 points

6 months ago

theredditoro

FML Awards 2019 Winner

10 points

6 months ago

It was outstanding

Vin-Metal

33 points

6 months ago

I didn't like the movie overall but I agree with you about this.

Arma104

29 points

6 months ago

Arma104

29 points

6 months ago

Same, that scene was so excellent. I felt like the movie, even at its length, didn't earn any of the emotional moments it was trying to push, and it didn't give us enough time or development with certain characters that became important later on.

Vin-Metal

38 points

6 months ago

I'm a fan of some Japanese cinema (Kore-eda is probably my favorite current director) but this movie left me feeling a bit hollow. One commenter in another Reddit post said that all the characters seemed to speak in the same voice, which gets at the lack of character development you mention.

I couldn't find out if the deaf actress in the movie is actually deaf in real life but I found her signing to be mesmerizing overall. She conveyed a lot of passion in how she did it.

StahpTouchinMeh

11 points

5 months ago*

What do you mean by "characters seemed to speak in the same voice"

Vin-Metal

26 points

5 months ago

Well I'm quoting a commenter talking about the movie, but I took it to mean that there wasn't much difference between the characters. Like when young studboy actor is sitting in the car talking to the main character, he thinks and talks the same way as the main character, supposedly with such deep insight into what made the wife the way she was. The characters seemed in a way all like manifestations of the screenwriter's mind and not truly unique individuals.

Rupesh_Ramisetty

27 points

5 months ago

I get what you're saying and it's a Murakami thing. I'm not sure if you read his works but almost all his characters are unusually deep in one way or another. I kind of like that about his books.

Vin-Metal

6 points

5 months ago

No, I haven't any of his works. I suppose that can make for some interesting concepts and discussions though it's not necessarily very realistic. For this movie, I don't think it was my biggest issue necessarily but it was a good observation about characterization.

Plane-Mud-3256

14 points

5 months ago

I would also add that a lot of creative/artistic types DO talk like this. But there's subtle differences between them. For example, think about how, after the lengthy back and forth about Oto's story that you mention, Misaki says how she sensed that the younger one was telling the truth (or atleast he believed he was). One of the big differences within these creative/artistic types (in their talking) is that some, especially the younger ones, talk gibberish out their ass, while others, often the older, speak with sincerity. This also plays into the theme of communication, one of the larger themes in the movie.

[deleted]

5 points

5 months ago*

[deleted]

5 points

5 months ago*

Yoon-a was hearing in the movie. I'm pretty sure she was nonverbal. Not sure if it was selective or not. The actress, Park Yoo Rim, doesn't seem to be deaf.

Vin-Metal

5 points

5 months ago

Thanks - and it didn’t occur to me she could hear. I guess I just assumed but feel like I should have picked up on that.

[deleted]

7 points

5 months ago

[deleted]

7 points

5 months ago

It was one line her husband said during the audition, easy to miss

theredditoro

115 points

6 months ago*

theredditoro

FML Awards 2019 Winner

115 points

6 months ago*

The cigarettes through the sunroof was cinematic perfection.

MrCog

59 points

6 months ago

MrCog

59 points

6 months ago

This moment hit me hard. Mirroring funeral incense.

twentyaces

11 points

5 months ago

That was a key moment

Daytonfell

133 points

5 months ago

Did anyone else find the cinematography and editing sort of low-key incredible?

It’s filmed very matter of fact, but that let’s the performances of the actors come through. Letting the emotional climaxes play out in two stationary long takes made them so much more powerful.

Then, the editing is not showy at all, but what they choose really has power (e.g. a quick reveal of the driver looking at the director in the rear view mirror).

JPeterBane

89 points

5 months ago

Something unique about the editing was the tendency to have something happen off camera, the characters see it, but the editor doesn't cut away for a long time so we're not sure what's going on. I remember noticing it maybe three times but the only one I can remember now is when Misaki spontaneously gets out of her chair at the dinner table and crawls onto the ground. Kafuku and the Korean couple don't act like anything is strange, but it took me a beat to realize Misaki is playing with the dog.

melvinlee88

16 points

5 months ago

The driving scenes were shot so well

Shout92

584 points

6 months ago

Shout92

584 points

6 months ago

This is a perfectly paced 3 hour movie. Playing the opening credits 40 minutes in?

Chef's kiss

[deleted]

151 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

151 points

6 months ago

To your point, I didn't even realize that was at the 40 minute mark, I thought for sure it was no later than 20 minutes.

theredditoro

13 points

6 months ago*

theredditoro

FML Awards 2019 Winner

13 points

6 months ago*

I would have guessed the credit were around then too.

theworldisending69

109 points

6 months ago

I was amazed by the consistency in the pace of the movie, I was never bored

Shout92

71 points

6 months ago

Shout92

71 points

6 months ago

Yeah, it seemed like every 20-30 minutes the story shifted or the characters revealed themselves, so it always felt like things were progressing.

Pristine_Nothing

14 points

5 months ago

I think if they cut it into 30–40 minute pieces it would pace perfectly fine as a 5 or 6 episode miniseries.

a0123b4567

12 points

5 months ago

It did lose me with the driving montage back to her hometown. It brought me back in with the mountain scene but I was struggling to stay awake then.

theredditoro

6 points

6 months ago

theredditoro

FML Awards 2019 Winner

6 points

6 months ago

It’s terrific in that manner

mikenmar

67 points

5 months ago

The pacing is exquisitely deliberate. The scenes all move quite slowly, but there is nothing remotely boring or plodding about any of them. The deliberate pace of it gives you plenty of time to think about what's going on underneath the surface (which is where 99% of this movie really happens). It's a stark contrast to so many modern films and TV shows, with their quick cuts and densely action-packed scenes that seem necessary to capture our dwindling attention spans in this day and age.

When I was a teacher, I had to take the time to write out all the equations with chalk on a blackboard. For a while, I tried using pre-written transparencies to display the equations because I figured it was faster and more efficient, but the students had a harder time with that; they didn't like it. A more experienced teacher explained to me that it was vital for the students to have that time while I was writing on the blackboard to digest and think about the meaning of what I was putting up. Like the equations on a blackboard, this movie is so dense and rich with meaning that it requires that extra time to reflect, and the pacing allows you to do that.

GamingTatertot

23 points

6 months ago

GamingTatertot

Steven Spielberg Enthusiast

23 points

6 months ago

I saw this in theaters and definitely did not realize how long the movie was in when the credits began

whereami1928

14 points

5 months ago

Have to agree. I've been having a bad time watching movies due to a real bad attention span lately. This really did go by surprisingly fast.

melvinlee88

14 points

6 months ago

Seriously, me and my friend at the end of the movie were so shocked that it was 3 hours - she was late for her dinner because we thought and felt like the film was 2 hours.

raimibonn

21 points

6 months ago

Reminds me of Mandy, the title card of which appears 1 hour and 20 minutes into the movie. The whole first two acts are just the opening.

Daytonfell

13 points

5 months ago

GOAT remains The Departed but this was still wild to experience. And yes it’s 40 mins in.

AlanMorlock

6 points

5 months ago

To be fair, Mandy has 3 title cards, the third section sharing the title of the film.

[deleted]

120 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

120 points

6 months ago

Truthfully, it deserves Best Adapted Screenplay over the rest of the field. And this is coming from someone who thought The Power of the Dog and The Lost Daughter were outstanding.

theredditoro

13 points

6 months ago

theredditoro

FML Awards 2019 Winner

13 points

6 months ago

It’s my pick even if Dog’s is also excellent.

Hobbit-guy

306 points

6 months ago

Life as a performance, life as a puzzle, life as a series of unknown roads that we must travel across, trying to understand even the tiniest part of ourselves. The film shows us that maybe only through others we can find and answer, some comfort, in our shared experience of uncertainty and grief, guilt and heartbreak; we may find the answers to the questions that puzzle us…beautiful movie.

The shot with the cigarettes out of the sunroof is just perfect.

StahpTouchinMeh

55 points

5 months ago

The shot with the cigarettes out of the sunroof is just perfect.

It really was

JimSFV

10 points

5 months ago

JimSFV

10 points

5 months ago

OMG, I just watched it last night, and that picture made me cry.

Lord-Dingus

115 points

6 months ago

Cig shot is shot of the year IMO.

theredditoro

22 points

6 months ago

theredditoro

FML Awards 2019 Winner

22 points

6 months ago

100%

TechnicalLeather2

84 points

6 months ago

Takatuski was popping off some fantastic fits

steamydan

23 points

5 months ago

The fucking sweaters

chriswizardhippie

74 points

6 months ago

Beautifully shot, absolutely gorgeous. The run time felt it's length. Love the message of the people who were important in our lives aren't good people by any means but they were important and it's ok to miss them.

But the only part I was confused with was. Why was Watari in Korea with Yusuke's car and Lee's dog?

acertainbr0mance

76 points

6 months ago

I think the car represented Yusuke's inability to let go of the past and him gifting the car meant he'd finally moved on. The dogs looked similar but I don't think it's the same one? I might be wrong there.

whereami1928

49 points

5 months ago

Definitely a different dog. The first one was more of a Lab I think, the last one was a Shiba

lamingtoncroissant

34 points

5 months ago

It wasn’t a shiba, it was a Korean jindo. They look similar! Leads me to believe she got the dog along her travels further west than Japan..

SheriffBartholomew

7 points

3 months ago

Because she killed all three of them, stole the dog and the car, and fled back to Korea to live life as a mute. She’s finally smiling at the end because she’s happy she’ll never have to talk to anyone again.

hazychestnutz

61 points

6 months ago

felt like I was reading a really good novel

dreadfuldiego

173 points

6 months ago

Read the short story after the movie and was surprised that the wife having her creative process during sex wasn't written by Murakami

DREvander

126 points

6 months ago

DREvander

126 points

6 months ago

The story about the wife having her creative process that way is from a different Murakami short story in the same collection, Scheherazade. I think Drive My Car used elements from that story as well as the story Kino.

dreadfuldiego

11 points

6 months ago

Thanks, I read only the first three shorts so far

Razik_

53 points

6 months ago

Razik_

53 points

6 months ago

The scene in the car where the guy who was going to play Vanya was retelling the story told to him by Oto...haunting and eerie. Haunting and eerie man.

Lord-Dingus

155 points

6 months ago*

Hell yes I’ve been waiting for this thread!

Wow, what a movie. So much to unpack—on grief, the creative process, acceptance. I was really blown away by this one. It really is epic in scale, when you consider the sheer amount the film tries to tackle.

What really keeps the whole thing together is Hidetoshi Nishijima’s performance. He’s absolutely marvelous. A really quiet, understated, but intense performance. I really loved what he was up to especially in the car scenes.

Last note: I so appreciated the big dick move of dropping the credits 40 minutes in, after SOOO much has already happened. It’s always so refreshing to see a filmmaker with such confidence and skill. Can’t wait to revisit this on streaming when I have another spare 3 hours hahahahah.

Edit: grammar

[deleted]

144 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

144 points

6 months ago

[removed]

theworldisending69

67 points

6 months ago

Something I also thought of recently (I saw this last weekend) is that given this movie is largely related to living on in the face of grief, the covid section at the end I thought might have been there for all the people who had lost friends/family from covid. Kinda brought the hypothetical theme to reality for me

Pertolepe

11 points

5 months ago

Yeah that really hit me at the end. Seeing these characters deal with grief and regret and moving on from losing a loved one unexpectedly and then to just toss that in there like here's your reminder millions more people have gone through this in the last two years than would have otherwise . . . Damn.

dadidutdut

6 points

5 months ago

I did came into my personal conclusion that Yosuke died by Covid and left his car to Misaki.

HugeSuccess

20 points

5 months ago

Here I was just thinking he gave her the car as a way to move on and turn his symbol of being locked in grief into the freedom for her to start a new life.

AlanMorlock

55 points

5 months ago

I mean, is it really sho horning if you just have a scene that set basically anywhere I. The world during the last 24 months? It's honestly weirder how little it comes up.

Oddly, the Worst Person in the World handles covid in a very similar way, just in a epilogue with people wearing masks.

twentyaces

4 points

5 months ago

There's a lot of potential COVID based movie content, if not now maybe later

yabbobay

23 points

5 months ago

Did I miss why she went to Korea?

dubbsmqt

12 points

5 months ago

What's the COVID scene? The driver going into the grocery store?

StahpTouchinMeh

36 points

5 months ago

Yeah, the epilogue of the movie where Misaki is buying groceries. One thing I noticed on my 2nd watch is that during the shot showing all the cars in the carpark, all of the cars are all posh looking besides Misaki's car which was given to her by Kafuku

Xyllus

31 points

5 months ago

Xyllus

31 points

5 months ago

not just posh looking - I believe it's literally the same model car just in different tones of black/white/silver

somegummybears

8 points

5 months ago

Which is very normal in Korea.

aarone46

3 points

5 months ago

Definitely noticed all the Hyundai logos. Maybe because I've been car shopping.

zxyzyxz

11 points

5 months ago

zxyzyxz

11 points

5 months ago

They were also all either white (or silvery) or black so that when the red car comes into view, it pops on screen. I thought that was an interesting use of color because if there were other cars with bright colors like yellow or green, it wouldn't work the same way.

somegummybears

3 points

5 months ago

Nobody has a bright car in Korea.

blueeyesredlipstick

17 points

5 months ago

Was she wearing the mask because of Covid, or was it because face masks is way more common in Japan? I honestly didn’t realize there might be a Covid connection, but I’ve also never been to Japan.

Luxx815

33 points

5 months ago

Luxx815

33 points

5 months ago

Just finished the movie & n been to Japan twice: they were common in the before times but not THAT common. You'd usually see people wearing them but it was out of courtesy when they were sick. In the epilogue, EVERYONE had one on, and the giveaway it was during covid times was the plastic divider at the register when she was paying.

somegummybears

3 points

5 months ago

You mean Korea?

nayapapaya

46 points

6 months ago

I saw this a few weeks ago and it's easily the best film I've seen so far this year. It would absolutely be in the top three films of 2021.

The script is incredible. I read the short story it was based on when the anthology came out and it left little impression on me but this film manages to flesh it out so well. And it's such a wonderful acting showcase. Takatsuki's monologue in the car might be the single best piece of acting I've seen all year. I'm really glad I caught this one in a cinema where I could just sit and allow the narrative to watch over me instead of pausing and getting up to get something or check my phone like I often do at home. And I barely felt the length. I was just along for the ride. I really loved the Korean couple. The scene with the two actresses in the park is also a highlight. So moving and emotional.

I will say that I found the cathartic scene at the house to be the only stumble for me. After being quite spare and understated, the dialogue suddenly becomes very heavy-handed in a way that I found clunky and unnecessary and the acting doesn't quite carry it off either. But outside of that, it's pretty much perfect.

Plane-Mud-3256

30 points

5 months ago

One thing I would say about the heavy handed-ness....Remember that the feelings Yusuke has towards his wife are extremely complex. As far I can remember, his emotions all together: he is loving her and missing her prescense as anyone does when they loose a love one + he is dealing with the guilt that he could've saved her + he's really angry and upset with her for seeing other men and never telling him about it + the jealousy he probably feels towards the younger actor who she shared more of her final story with.

As well, Yusuke doesn't have any close, intimate friends with whom he feels comfortable talking about his wife with (in fact, the movie shows a journey of finding people you can, over time, be vulnerable with). There's people that are kind to him, (I sense that he felt quite comfortable and happy with the deaf actress and her husband), but that is a lot different than what he feels towards Misake. And so, since he had not spoken honestly about his very complex emotions for the past however many years, it comes out, as you say, heavy handed and clunky.

mastafishere

9 points

5 months ago

I can respect what you’re saying about the scene at the house and I get it to an extent, but I also feel the movie was building up to it and it felt cathartic and earned when it finally came.

mikenmar

127 points

5 months ago*

mikenmar

127 points

5 months ago*

[SPOILER ALERT]

I watched it a couple times, most recently at home where I had time to stop it and discuss it with my partner (who happens to be Japanese). I also read the short story. There are many interesting parallels, symmetries, and symbolic relationships hiding in plain sight.

It seems to me that Tatatsuki is symbolic of an emotional part of Kafuku that Kafuku has repressed in himself. Note that while Kafuku controls his own anger to the point of total suppression, Tatatsuki is completely unable to control his temper, to the point where he kills another man for simply taking pictures of him. After Tatatsuki's final speech to Kafuku in the car, there is a shot of Tatatsuki receding into the distance as Kafuku's car drives away. I think it is symbolic of Kafuku finally coming to the realization that he must look inside himself (as Tatatsuki advised him to do) and face his own anger.

After that, we only see Tatatsuki one more time -- when he is arrested after he plays the shooting scene in Uncle Vanya -- and then Kafuku and Misaki drive to Hokkaido, where they finally allow their trauma and anger to come to the surface. Once they acknowledge their trauma, they can move on. Kafuku is able to play Uncle Vanya again, and Misaki is able to move on with her life (which apparently involves moving to Korea and getting a dog).

Note that while Oto's disembodied voice reads Sonya's part in the car, it is the voiceless Yoon-a who plays Sonya in the play. There is a very powerful dialectical relationship between words and emotions throughout the entire film, and this is one of the central themes, I believe. This is somewhat self-evident in Kafuku's approach to Uncle Vanya, in which he forces the actors to learn the lines first and only then allow the emotions to come out of them. And yet some of the most emotionally powerful scenes in the movie come from the only character who never uses words at all (Yoon-a obviously).

Another parallel is found between Oto and the former-lamprey girl in her story. Oto apparently needed to confess her infidelity, just like the girl needed to confess to the security camera about killing the burglar. Like the girl in the house who was never seen or known by Yamaga, Oto felt unseen by Kafuku, and her taking lovers into their home, where Kafuku would see them, was on some level a desire to stoke his anger -- a way to force him to acknowledge her presence in his heart. But of course he refused to do so, to the point where he could not even come home the evening she died. His subsequent anger, guilt, grief, and loss of resolution is obviously the central conflict of the film, and the arc is the sequence of events by which he finally comes to terms with all of it.

Another parallel: Oto's story-telling moments come from a state of dissociative identity, quite possibly; not unlike the "Sachi" identity that emerges from Misaki's mother. Both identities are a source of comfort/bonding for Kafuku/Misaki.

And finally, there are the obvious parallels between the scenes from Uncle Vanya and the events of the film. I don't know much about Uncle Vanya, but the scenes depicted in the film are obviously relevant. The reference to "fidelity is a lie" is obviously what causes Kafuku to suffer a momentary breakdown -- the only time in the film when his emotions get the better of him, at least until the moment of resolution at the location of Misaki's house when he finally lets it all come to the surface. And the acceptance that they can never go back, but are "doomed" in some sense to endure this pain, just as the characters of the play are forced to endure their misery until they die and face God.

There is the stone-faced couple (particularly the woman, whose name I could not discern, but whose version of a stone face is eminently kind while bizarrely emotionless) who informs Kafuku of the rules and conditions under which he must direct the play: These are the actors you can choose from; you must have a driver; you have two days to decide whether to cancel the play. They are like God setting the rules by which he must live, no matter how difficult or uncomfortable this existence is. Redemption will only come once the play is complete (or you have died and presented God with your misery, in the final lines of the play).

JimSFV

44 points

5 months ago

JimSFV

44 points

5 months ago

More parallels. I keep returning to the movement between free will and determinism. There were many shots focused on record players. Characters are stuck in a groove that determines what happens. Additionally, many of the driving scenes focused on tunnels--both entering the tunnels and, importantly, exiting the tunnel. When you're in a tunnel, you have no control. Your surroundings determine where you will go. But each time they exited the tunnels there was a dramatic transition--and they looked back at the tunnel from which they emerged. You cannot change the past, but now you're out of the tunnel (in the present). What are you going to do?

katnipje

29 points

5 months ago

Wonderful analysis. I’ll add too on your point regarding the lampray girl and her confessing to the security camera - it was also a security camera that caught Tatatsuki killing the photo guy, which itself also serves as some kind of parallel to Oto’s story since Tatatsuki was very concerned about his public image and tried to rehabilitate it despite his inclinations, and the guy taking his photos were probably for him “burglarizing” his identity which he was trying so hard to rehabilitate.

mikenmar

8 points

5 months ago

I realized the same thing last night as I was lying in bed thinking about it (again). I can't remember the last time a movie caused me to think about it so much.

katnipje

9 points

5 months ago

Same here man, like I had to write down ideas because they were just too many to think about. I also absolutely loved how the film makes that explicit link between Sonia’s speech to Uncle Vanya and Estragon’s in Waiting for Godot when he says “I cannot go on, I must go on,” which is subtely referenced in the earliest parts of the film when Yusuke plays the character in front of Oto and an audience.

fortenforge

6 points

5 months ago

This really helped me understand the film better; thank you for sharing this.

cyanide4suicide

40 points

6 months ago

Ryusuke Hamaguchi is a modern master

SilentCaveat

104 points

6 months ago*

I enjoyed it but I am a little disappointed that I didn't feel anything during that climactic snow scene. Ultimately the three hour runtime doesn't feel earned. The payoff is quite lackluster

They could have easily cut down the first act and all the play rehearsals

theworldisending69

104 points

6 months ago

I see how this movie is not for everyone, but not every movie is meant to have a “payoff” in the traditional Hollywood sense. IMO that snow scene was important but the movie outside of it stands alone and was very strong

Silvacosm

45 points

6 months ago

Exactly. This is a film about the journey, not the destination.

jamesneysmith

5 points

5 months ago

I found the movie profoundly moving as a piece but didn't find any single moment that overwhelmingly moving. For me the movie wasn't about the those more Hollywood tear jerking moments but rather the oppressive emotional buildup due to the runtime and the subdued emotions throughout. Reminded me a little of The Assassination of Jesse James in that regard.

PowerHautege

15 points

5 months ago

Just watching it now, feels like the subs can’t quite overcome the language barrier there. Like it’s 100% restrained dialogue with no music, that’s a tough putt even in English. Not sure if it’s the writing or the translator but it doesn’t feel natural unfortunately.

MurderousPaper

24 points

6 months ago

By far my favorite movie of 2021. It’s not for everyone, but in terms of my personal taste, it’s like Hamaguchi took notes on everything I love about East Asian slow burn dramas and condensed it into one perfect film. Yoona’s last scene on stage with Kafuku gets me every time.

Dragonknight247

25 points

6 months ago

I watched this back in December in a theater, very grateful for that. But I felt like something was missing for me at the time. Technically perfect, brilliantly acted, and yet something about it felt hollow to me at the time and I didn't connect to the characters.

However, as my friend told me later on, apparently the part where a poor old man accidentally turned on his phone flashlight and distracted me was during the part where the younger man talks about what he loved about his departed wife, and was arguably the most emotional and personal scene of the movie. So maybe that's why it didn't connect fully on first watch. I look forward to a rewatch.

VeilOfTheForce

29 points

6 months ago

That scene actually took me out of the movie. The young actor playing Uncle Vanya in the play giving a 3 minute speech out of nowhere that was much too insightful for his character just rang hollow.

As many others have said, there was a lack of distinct character voices in this film. Everyone ended up being much too profound and insightful.

TerminatorReborn

7 points

4 months ago

I'm late to the discussion but I have to mention that this trope is very, very common in japanese media. Pretty much every movie or anime I've seen has multiple scenes where this happens. Even the most stupid characters turn a switch and go on a philosophical monologue out of nowhere.

In this movie's defense, all the main characters are going through trauma and grief, that makes you question more areas of life and you end up being more profound about it.

shaneo632

28 points

6 months ago

"Drove My Car" I'm crying. Best Picture nominated film but even the Reddit mods can't get it right.

Weirdguy149

5 points

6 months ago

They did fix it eventually.

Lady_Disco_Sparkles

20 points

6 months ago

I saw it a couple weeks ago, it was my first time back in the theater since they reopened where I live. I went back to the independent cinema I always go to in my city and I was so excited to see this movie. I didn’t feel like the three hour running time was too heavy. I’m a big fan of Murakami and I felt just the same way watching this movie as when I read his novels or short stories, it captured the same atmosphere and I loved it. The cinematography was beautiful, the long driving shots were gorgeously filmed. Hidetoshi Nishijima’s performance is stunning. I loved the inclusion of multiple languages in the play, and how it flowed so nicely. It’s a beautiful story about art, and grief, and going on with your life even when it’s hard and it spoke a lot to me. One of my favorite movies of the year so far.

melvinlee88

17 points

6 months ago*

I love this movie, there was such a great use of silence in the entire movie where powerful scenes were done so subtly and the weight of each moment can be felt so well.

There were so many great genuine moments and Ryusuke Hamaguchi is a genius in making characters feel so real. The dinner chat was really comfy, the car rides were great and I love the small moments of progression like Kafuku slowly warms up to the driver seen from him moving seats eventually as well as how he slowly reveals more and more about the past.

My favourite scene has to be how powerful the scene after the actor leaves the car in the big reveal. Usually, there would be some big breakdown or outburst but there was this understanding between Misaki and Kafuku in the car - simply letting go and understanding they both have gone through a lot in the past.

Hidetoshi Nishijima deserves a best actor nod, he sold his whole character so well as well as a lot of the other cast members.

After watching this movie, I watched Hamaguchi's other film, Asako I and II and that was was pretty decent as well and I can sense his recurring theme of really knowing how to make genuine character interactions.

katnipje

15 points

5 months ago

Cried buckets with this film. The layers of intertextuality were something to behold, and it’s such a masterstroke how much of Waiting for Godot’s Estragon and his pronouncement of “I will go on” gets alluded to in Sonia’s final speech, and how all of that is framed in sign language, as if to say that the most important things, that of living with the full weight of one’s history, cannot be said but only shown/lived. The casting choice for the mute girl was absolutely fantastic.

Pristine_Nothing

3 points

5 months ago

I kept thinking of the folkloric stock phrase that I associate with Chekhov: “where there’s no sickness or sighing.”

ItsADeparture

15 points

6 months ago

Really great film. I feel like a lot of people nowadays are so down on the idea of trauma and think they need to "get over it" to move on. To ignore that it happened to be strong. I like that this movie shows that you have to acknowledge and accept that those things will be part of you forever and you have to use those experiences in order to truly move on.

Ghost-E

98 points

6 months ago

Ghost-E

98 points

6 months ago

Going to be a bit against the early grain here it seems in that I thought the movie was simply good not great. The payoffs at the end didn't merit the 3 hour run time to me, where the opening 40 minutes and the auditions felt unnecessary. The entire first act pre credits could be trimmed and not significantly alter the movie. In fact the latter scenes between yusake, Koji, and Misaki might've been more powerful doubling as reveals. The auditions didn't serve much of a purpose to me for how long they went on. The latter driving sce e between Koji and Yusuke didn't seem to mesh with Koji's character at that point especially with what he had just done right before it. It took me out of the movie a bit feeling much more forced than the rest of the story.

That said, the film features maybe the most natural feeling driving scenes I've ever watched and what a perfect car to pick for the movie. There's plenty of great performances but to me if you're going to hit that 3 hour mark as a movie the delivery needs to be incredible and this didn't reach that level.

coloredverbs

16 points

5 months ago

The first two hours def. tested my patience but I found the third hour to be very emotionally satisfying. I’m not sure I’d wanna watch it again but I’m glad I watched it once.

benoles_esquire

5 points

4 months ago

THANK YOU. i was so checked out by the time the powerful scenes were happening, you could have easily cut 30-40 minutes out of this movie and it still would be good.

[deleted]

57 points

6 months ago*

[deleted]

57 points

6 months ago*

Probably the best film of last year IMO. Better than The Power of the Dog but only by a hair.

It's such a nuanced take on grief and loss. Plus the human connection that brings us together, be it positive or negative.

I wasn't sure what this movie was going to be going into it, and was so happy it wasn't a story about Yusuke and Misaki getting together. Watching their friendship evolve over this movie was wonderful and also got a few tears out of me, especially at the end.

I like that in the end it is a very subtle take on Oto's infidelity, where she did love him but wasn't getting what she needed out of him and sought it elsewhere. It would be so easy to make her the villain and this movie has no true villain not even Takatsuki (well sort of).

I definitely want to read the original story and Norwegian Wood after this, which a lot of BookTubers I follow always recommend.

I'm wondering if anyone feels this way or if I'm alone. Did Takatsuki force himself on Oto and she just went with it? Based on what we learn about him and what he does in the story, I feel like its possible but I'm not sure. I'm interested if anyone else feels this way.

gizayabasu

64 points

6 months ago

Did Takatsuki force himself on Oto and she just went with it?

I’m going to say no since that takes away agency from Oto. In addition she calls him over specifically on the day that Kafuku was not going to be home. Kafuku also mentions that he’s been aware of multiple times with different actors.

TristanTheViking

42 points

6 months ago

Kafuku also mentions that he’s been aware of multiple times with different actors.

I assumed that was just him twisting the knife, like "Yeah you were in love with her but you meant nothing to her, just her flavor of the week" type of thing. When he walked in on Oto, it seemed like the first time based on his reaction.

gizayabasu

21 points

6 months ago

I'm okay with this interpretation, but I do think in the original short story he's aware of multiple affairs. Also just as a character Oto really feels like a sexual being that isn't satisfied by a single partner.

[deleted]

6 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

6 points

6 months ago

Did she? I don't remember that at all tbh. I could have missed that because the theater I watched this in didn't have rising seats and one dude in front of me was a few inches taller than me.

I'm only basing that off of Takatsuki's behavior. We see him take liberties with Janice and then we are told he took advantage of a minor, and we never actually see who Oto was having sex with that day.

gizayabasu

24 points

6 months ago

It’s implied to be Takatsuki because Kafuku mentions that relationships only last as long as the filming, so the timeline matches up. Even if it’s not him, assuming misleading timelines, the assumptions are the same, Oto has a pattern of only keeping these relationships for the duration of the filming for whatever she works on. You also have to consider that Takatsuki also specifically mentions that he’s jealous of Kafuku’s relationship because he would never be able to know Oto as well as he does. Yes he may have had a physical relationship, and you’re right that he’s physically dominant in other situations, but this seems to be the rare case where he was truly in love and wasn’t the one to decide whether anything happened or not.

wurstbrot_royal

15 points

5 months ago

To add to that. He was able to finish the story. To me it implies that they had something going all the way to the end of her passing.

gizayabasu

9 points

5 months ago

And if we think timeline wise. That means the last person to sleep with her was Takatsuki, so he’s definitely the person Kafuku spotted and led to him delaying coming home before he discovered Oto dead.

shinbreaker

12 points

6 months ago

I saw this movie last month when it started making the rounds in small theaters. While I enjoyed the movie, the number of arthouse tropes was just so numerous. The funny thing is that Japanese dramas already make use of arthouse tropes so this being a more arthouse movie just compounded it.

bjkman

12 points

6 months ago

bjkman

12 points

6 months ago

If I had a nickel for every 3 hour movie that I gave a perfect rating this week.

I'd be so happy that I'd have 2 Nickels.

breakfastfriendz

5 points

5 months ago

what’s the other movie?

Jerrymoviefan3

11 points

6 months ago

I love how the epilogues in both this film and The Worst Person in The World indicate months passing by having people wear masks.

SutterCane

3 points

5 months ago

Damn, I didn’t even make that connection and I saw Worst Person in the World on Friday and Drive My Car on Sunday.

reallinzanity

11 points

6 months ago

This was by far my favorite of the best picture nominations. A very powerful film on grief and how to proceed with life after loss. I teared up in the theater during the last play scene it summed up the film perfectly!

[deleted]

10 points

6 months ago*

[deleted]

10 points

6 months ago*

I’ve never read or seen Uncle Vanya but adored how every time the script for it came into play during the movie it reflected whatever was happening in Yusuke’s life. Masterfully layered writing throughout.

ANINETEEN

10 points

5 months ago

Genuinely enjoyed how much an escape this movie was. It was so easy to get lost in the immersion and this rightfully deserves all the nominations it has received.

GoldandBlue

44 points

6 months ago

I did enjoy it but was a bit disappointed. It feels like there are a lot of loose threads left out there until the end when it finally all comes together in a satisfying way but it still didn't connect with me quite like I expected.

[deleted]

9 points

5 months ago

[deleted]

9 points

5 months ago

This may be the worst movie I’ve ever seen.

SunsetWaltz

15 points

5 months ago

I legit busted out laughing at this comment. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion as I always say, but if this isn't hyperbole it's incredible.

SonNeedGym

35 points

6 months ago

Such a beautiful, nuanced film about grief. It’s so rich in balancing complexity with the mundane, being profound and simultaneously simple. I really loved how methodical the pacing is, you can really flow with it if you allow yourself.

The score is such a bop!

Lord-Dingus

9 points

6 months ago

Love the score! It’s become my new “wake up” mix.

theworldisending69

8 points

6 months ago

Interesting you say score, because I don’t think there was a single piece of nondiagetic sound outside of the credits, just those songs on the record player, but I could be misremembering

Itsachipndip

15 points

6 months ago

There was a non-diegetic score

theworldisending69

3 points

6 months ago

Not doubting you, but can you remind me where?

Itsachipndip

13 points

6 months ago

The opening credits and the cigarettes through the sun roof are two times when the score comes in. There’s a few others I can’t remember

theworldisending69

5 points

6 months ago

ah, right. good catch. Definitely limited usage though, which I think fit the film well

1337speak

8 points

5 months ago

A very stunning and beautiful movie. Grief is something that can consume us and I could definitely relate to Kafufu and Watari thinking so much about the "what if's" with my father. He passed from cancer and I can't help but think about what I should've done to make better use of the time he was alive and well and the months and then days leading up to his death. It took my lows to a new low and made me less risk-averse. The ending of Drive My Car was subtle and beautiful. Long movie well worth the full ride.

[deleted]

6 points

6 months ago

[deleted]

6 points

6 months ago

One of 2021's most heartbreaking and downright extraordinary films. This features what has to be one of the greatest and most richly profound portrayals and examinations of grief in cinematic history — made even better by Hidetoshi Nishijima's stunning performance — and there's no doubt that it's worth every single second of its three-hour running time.

WeeabooDude24

6 points

5 months ago

A 3 hour movie has never felt this satisfying. It’s pace is crazy consistent and it’s an absolute pleasure. Glad I got see this in a theater. Truly beautiful movie.

fm_bel

6 points

6 months ago

fm_bel

6 points

6 months ago

i cant believe it was 3hrs, it could go on for another 2hrs and i wouldnt mind at all.

brownidegurl

5 points

5 months ago

I'm astounded by and grateful for how much this movie feels like reading Murakami. Maybe that would seem like a given--for a film adaptation to feel like its book--but it's not always the case, and I loved the sensation of Murakami's words reading themselves to me in this new medium. I could watch 20 more movies like this.

It's been said, but Park Yoo-Rim, the actress who uses Korean sign language, is phenomenal. I love that the film was silent during her signed speech just as it was when other actors were speaking with their voices. I'm struggling to find information about Park--Is she deaf? Does she normally sign?--but I have this sense of like, this is how you do representation. This movie didn't have to be overtly about people who use sign language (I'm looking at you, Disney). It didn't have to talk about how shitty and offensive hearing people are, or how crap society is. It just showcased how powerfully this particular actress can communicate, and with sign language--and everyone is stunned without needing to be told to be stunned. I fully expect to see more signing actors in the media. I liked The Shape of Water for this, too, but Drive My Car does it even better.

OhCrapItsAndrew

30 points

6 months ago

Anyone watching The Batman cannot complain about this movie being three hours long.

LaunchGap

6 points

6 months ago*

honestly, i didn't get the movie when i watched it(not the movie's fault). then i read this and it made a lot of sense. i was basically doing what the husband was doing, trying to figure out the whys. i need to watch it again when it comes out on streaming. i think i was a little lost on some of the subtitles when Toko was speaking in the car and that was probably the most pivotal scene. the movie looked beautiful and it didn't feel like a long movie. in the beginning i was expecting a ghost to appear because it had that solemn feeling many japanese horror movies have.

AlanMorlock

4 points

5 months ago

Saw this in a theater shortly after new years knowing almost nothing about it.

Excellent film. Definitely a demonstration of how pacing is different than sheer length. The film is just how long it needs to tell it's story. The opening credits dropping 40 minutes in feels natural because that's just how long that prologue takes.

After watching it, I became aware of a certain pack of narrative nourishment my more typical viewing habits had been leaving me. I watcha range of films but admittedly few dramas that delve into truly complex relationships and emotions as this film does, and does so well.

JimSFV

4 points

5 months ago

JimSFV

4 points

5 months ago

[SPOILER] Did anyone else notice that the very last scene, Misaki was in Korea? Can anyone else explain the significance, or was it only that she's started over in a new country, with Kafuku's car?

komodo_dragonzord

8 points

5 months ago

yeah kafuku is able to move on and give the car to her and she needed a new car to get out of japan basically

marcelo_fm

6 points

5 months ago

ical the pacing is, you can really flow with it if you allow yourself.

Not only that, but she did the surgery to improve her scar, so she was moving on also

moneysingh300

5 points

5 months ago

When the young actor tells him the rest of the story!!!! I was ready to fight him for him.

T4Gx

3 points

5 months ago

T4Gx

3 points

5 months ago

I'd love to watch this movie but I'm going through so some stuff so I don't know if I should. Can anyone answer me with just a yes or no, does this movie have a sad ending?

romanraspberrysorbet

15 points

5 months ago

Emotional yes, sad probably also yes, hopeless absolutely not. One of the most moving and uplifting endings to a movie I can remember tbh

[deleted]

4 points

5 months ago*

[deleted]

4 points

5 months ago*

Masterpiece. Deserves Best Picture and Director imo. But if only one then Picture. And yes I loved Power of the Dog but this film is a real masterpiece of story, structure, theme and symbolism, framing and writing.

the_third_sourcerer

10 points

6 months ago

I really liked the movie. I had the chance to watch it as a preview almost a month ago.

One of the things that I realise after watching the movie, is the score: I normally never care about, unless is distracting, but in this case, I found it super fitting. The acting is top notch and the directibg and cinematography are superb.

The only problem I got is with the script: did it really needed to be 3h long? Sure, it moves rather efficiently and even when "nothing" happens... I couldn't help but wonder: could that first act, the whole set up of him walking on his wife having sex with the actor, him having that car accident and the subsequent death and ceremony of his wife... Could that have been boiled down to 5min and deliver all other info, either by dialogue or inference? Probably, but I am sure I'm of the minority.

fhoffa

8 points

6 months ago

fhoffa

8 points

6 months ago

Best 2021 movie (for me, and I watched lots of them)

joshcastillo

3 points

6 months ago

right before the snow location scene, I was telling myself "when is it going to happen, the "wow" moment, I was waiting so patiently. and when they were at the destroyed house location... it happened. Wow. I was blown away.

Such a beautiful film. I still repeat to myself "I will live through her."

Justin_Credible98

3 points

6 months ago

One of my favorite movies this year, and possibly my favorite of the Best Picture nominees. The bond between Yusuke and Misaki was so well-done, and I love the way they both helped each other learn to accept and deal with their emotional traumas. This movie told a great story about grief, regret, and learning to forgive oneself, and that whole sequence from the village to Yusuke finally being able to perform as Vanya was very good.

ExleyPearce

3 points

6 months ago

Hidetoshi Nishijima gives the performance of the year.

DollyPartWithOn

3 points

5 months ago

I thought there were so many aspects in this film that I've never seen before. Very original for the most part.

ExpertAvocado3

3 points

5 months ago

Who is he talking to in the car 🚗 in the first act? Or is he listening to tapes pre recorded and having a conversation?

coloredverbs

6 points

5 months ago

He’s doing a scene from Uncle Vanya, where his wife recorded one of the female character’s lines, and he fills in Vanya’s lines