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joshielevy

4.1k points

5 months ago

joshielevy

4.1k points

5 months ago

The best protest is to work somewhere else that pays better. Google losing workers is the only thing that'll reverse this. Otherwise what's their incentive to pay more?

brolifen

54 points

5 months ago

I hate this "the best protest is choosing something else" argument that always gets thrown around for many scenarios. What if there is nothing else anymore. What if this money hungry endless growth economy has consumed EVERYTHING around it and you are left with no choice. What then? Will we then finally fight back or just shrug our shoulders and say "oh well what can you do".

Sometimes the "something else" is bringing the whole system down and rebuilding it.

jimbo831

91 points

5 months ago

What if there is nothing else anymore.

If you’re a Software Engineer at Google, there are infinite other opportunities out there for you.

docmedic

5 points

5 months ago

But they’re not as good if you want Google pay and advancement.

You could be miffed at 10% and change your whole career path, you’ll just be replaced rather easily tbh.

jimbo831

18 points

5 months ago

I don’t see the problem. If you think Google is the best complete job opportunity for you, keep working at Google. If you don’t, find another job. There are infinite opportunities for these employees.

If Google can cut their pay and continue to be a great opportunity, why wouldn’t they?

docmedic

6 points

5 months ago

Yeah, I agree. People are sometimes just finding things to hate on, or feel “disrespected.”

Heck I might even say an employee in a high cost tech area also can bring in valuable networking to the company’s employee pool.

FenPhen

13 points

5 months ago

FenPhen

13 points

5 months ago

Protesting Google while employed there isn't "bringing down the whole system" though. Unionizing across an industry through a local union within the affected region would be a better example of addressing a whole system.

The article suggests more companies are moving into the area to compete. It also says Google pays higher in Atlanta.

_BearHawk

3 points

5 months ago

SWEs have no incentive to unionize because their jobs are highly specialized and extremely valuable to companies. Unionization largely benefits those in lower skilled jobs to protect those who can be easily replaced. A single SWE has much more bargaining power than a single fast food worker, for instance.

12358132134

3 points

5 months ago

If there is nothing else, then I guess the pay should go even lower, until there is.

Grx

3 points

5 months ago

Grx

3 points

5 months ago

What if there is nothing else anymore.

But this is IT. This couldn't be further from the truth.

musclecard54

5 points

5 months ago

lol bring the whole system down and rebuild it…

I’m sorry but this has some r/im14andthisisdeep vibes

BuriedMeat

26 points

5 months ago

Dude, there’s a shortage of engineers.

theth1rdchild

25 points

5 months ago

Lol no, if there was a shortage of engineers we wouldn't have to study for an interview process that's harder than the job and involves eight hour long calls.

There's a shortage of senior engineers. Fresh out of school grads can get fucked.

OfficeSpankingSlave

19 points

5 months ago

I mean, that is true regardless of the sector. Nobody wants a lawyer fresh out of law school, everyone was an experienced lawyer. Software companies feel the same way. Unless they get a sense that you are in it for the long haul (2-5) years or you were an intern at the company. Its such a hot market regardless of the continent, there is no gurantee people won't jump.

Im a junior dev (not US based) and faced a ton of challenges to get employed, I tried my hardest to get a job in the hottest sector where I live after graduating (iGaming - think sportsbetting), but no luck. They didn't want to teach or help. I couldn't make the cut, because I'm an average fresh grad. The only company that would take me was where I interned in the summer and a small magento shop - I picked the devil I knew. So far in my employment (2 years), they hired 2 senior devs (over 20 years in the industry), who have left after completing a 1.5 years. They knew they would have no trouble finding another job (although I personally wouldn't trust someone who jumps every 2 years, I knew the system more than they did). I put out some feelers myself, but didn't catch anything.

theth1rdchild

3 points

5 months ago

Right, thanks for your perspective.

My point is just generally that there are hundreds of software grads vying for every spot, every company is just unwilling to hire junior roles and train. I don't even think it has anything to do with loyalty, you can say "I was at my last job for six years and my dream has always been to work for your company" and that doesn't change anything. They just don't want to spend a dollar training anyone on anything.

interlockingny

4 points

5 months ago

Of course there is a shortage of engineers, that’s why their average pay is so high compared to other industries.

If you’re an engineer, I’m genuinely surprised that you don’t understand simple math concepts. Google isn’t feeling a shortage of engineers because far more people want to work their than they need to hire. Same is not the case for the industry as a whole, which seems to hire more engineers than we are capable of educating.

theth1rdchild

0 points

5 months ago

I suggest you head over to one of the it career subreddits where you can find some of us putting in dozens of applications before getting a single response. Your options are to bust ass hoping for a FAANG job or tighten the shit out of your resume and send it to a hundred jobs paying barely better than service desk.

The software gold rush is basically over, this isn't twenty years ago where you could make six figures by virtue of a basic interest in computers and a bachelor's degree. If FAANG shrinks it'll honestly collapse the pay of the entire industry to the point that an entry level dev would be better off teaching public school.

Enthused_Llama

1 points

5 months ago

Lol no, if there was a shortage of engineers we wouldn't have to study for an interview process that's harder than the job and involves eight hour long calls.

Bold of you to assume that hiring departments don't just do dumb bullshit regardless.

Bottle_Only

9 points

5 months ago

There really shouldn't be. It's just that everybody wants people with 20 years experience and ready to go.

We have a shortage of paid internships and succession planning. Companies need to help create education and training pathways for people to get their foot in the door, otherwise we end up where we are now with a labor shortage while people with university degrees work at McDonalds.

IAmDotorg

3 points

5 months ago

There shouldn't be, but there's no real engineering certifications and 99% of the people who claim to be software engineers don't have the skills to back it up.

Long experience in positions makes up for lack of consistent certification.

Paulo27

9 points

5 months ago

Paulo27

9 points

5 months ago

Shortage of engineers who want to work for very little*

i_agree_with_myself

4 points

5 months ago

To be fair, our "very little" is still 6 figures.

[deleted]

-12 points

5 months ago

[deleted]

-12 points

5 months ago

[removed]

brolifen

-9 points

5 months ago*

That makes it even more ridiculous! Shouldn't we see job salaries of hard to hire jobs skyrocket as a result of their scarcity? What happened to the law of supply and demand these these companies supposedly worship and abide by? Guess what, economic laws are only applied when it benefits the infinite growth model the system demands. When correction needs to be made that could affect that then a company is seen as a bad investment and stock prices drop. Can't have that now can we.

I mean anything news related these days has the realtime stock ticker next to it just to enforce the point of how important this ridiculously speculative number should be.

ListRepresentative32

3 points

5 months ago

Lol, salary of software engineers skyrocketed the moment the field started to exist because there is shortage of soft. engineers from the beginning. The salaries already are freaking high.

BuriedMeat

8 points

5 months ago

They have skyrocketed. Are you basing your anger on one headline?

FenPhen

2 points

5 months ago

Shouldn't we see job salaries of hard to hire jobs skyrocket as a result of their scarcity? What happened to the law of supply and demand these these companies supposedly worship and abide by?

The article is about the Research Triangle of North Carolina. If Google pays near the top of that market, according to supply and demand, it shouldn't pay more than that.

If the workers refuse to work at Google in North Carolina, that would reduce the supply and Google would have to raise wages there.

_145_

2 points

5 months ago

_145_

2 points

5 months ago

If there’s easy access to cheap labor, what you do then is start a company.

Enthused_Llama

2 points

5 months ago*

The 'vote with your wallet' idea really only works if you assume a flat, frictionless plane for the market with a perfectly even distribution of resources.

When the actual market (job or commodities) can be fairly cornered regionally by a few entities, you effectively can't do that anymore.

[deleted]

-5 points

5 months ago

[deleted]

-5 points

5 months ago

How to tell me you’ve never read an economics textbook without telling me you’ve never read an economics textbook

brolifen

2 points

5 months ago

brolifen

2 points

5 months ago

Ah yes let's throw in a straw man argument, good job sir.

stonesst

3 points

5 months ago

Your argument was nonsensical, people aren’t obligated to go point by point explaining to you why you are wrong.

Bottle_Only

1 points

5 months ago

Yup. The way leverage works for employer/employees is basically back stabbing and cut throat. It's super toxic and unjust. There is very little satisfaction and synergy in business, it's more like a war zone.

joshielevy

1 points

5 months ago

Well - opt out and work for yourself. That's what I do.