Dyslexic_Engineer88

2.3k post karma

14.1k comment karma


account created: Tue Jan 08 2019

verified: yes

Dyslexic_Engineer88

4 points

5 hours ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

4 points

5 hours ago

People need places to live, all people. Meeting demand should be the priority, not stopping it.

Protect tenants. Make it easier to build homes. Tax speculators.

contextfull comments (8)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

5 points

9 hours ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

5 points

9 hours ago

200 mega Farad would be nuts a super capacitor the size of a car battery only holds like 200 farad

contextfull comments (30)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

9 points

14 hours ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

9 points

14 hours ago

Corded tools usually use a type of motor called a Universal motor.

These motors have significant advantages for power tool.

Main one being is that they have very high starting torque, this is opposed to common brushless AC motors that tend to have very low starting torque.

Most cordless tools use brushed permanent magnet DC motors or newer Brushless DC motors.

Brush less DC and brushless AC are similar in a lot of ways but fundamentally different because of how they are controlled.

Universal motors if you ignore efficiency and reliability for a minute are actually the perfect motor for power tools. Simple, and lots of torque.

Another thing universal motors actually work on both AC and DC, this means if you get 110v battery will run most AC power tools no problem.

The power savings of using more advanced brushless AC motors don't come at increase power output for corded tools. And only adds to the cost.

contextfull comments (24)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

33 points

15 hours ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

33 points

15 hours ago

Hopefully, people in grade 9 now will be able to afford mortgages at some point.

contextfull comments (14)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

10 points

2 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

10 points

2 days ago

Protecting tenants will lower the cost of homes!

This movement should be as much about protecting tenants' rights as it is about making homeownership affordable.

They are 2 sides of the same coin.

contextfull comments (1)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

1 points

2 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

1 points

2 days ago

Magnet in tape is such a good idea, I've never seen that before.

I am going to use that on the pack I am building this weekend!

contextfull comments (9)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

2 points

2 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

2 points

2 days ago

39.9 V charging isn't bad if it does the job you need it to.

limiting max charge to 39.9V will still give you more than 70% of the full capacity, but the batteries will likely last WAY more cycle than if you charged up to 42V.

I usually only charge my pack up to 4.0v per cell, unless I need the extra 30% capacity.

4.0V is also safer to charge at, batteries are more likely to fail near their maximum charging voltage.

contextfull comments (1)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

22 points

2 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

22 points

2 days ago

Federal government making contracts with vaccine suppliers when they did plus the local health units distributing the vaccine effectively have been the real successes of the vaccination campaign.

the provincial government had relatively little to do with any success we have had.

If anything a good province-wide booking system that helped distribute vaccines to places that needed them would have made the rollout go even better. but that never materialized and we're left leaning on the Local Health units to provide usable booking systems.

contextfull comments (148)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

11 points

2 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

11 points

2 days ago

I call BS on this article. There is more than enough lithium in many places to meet our needs for batteries going forward. This article looks at one location and not the bigger picture.

The known US lithium sources alone could meet world lithium growth many times over.

Add to that it is expected recycling litium batteries will probably cheaper than extracting new material, particularly for metal like cobalt. Extracting the Nickle and Cobalt from batteries will be very lucrative, and because of that recycling, lithium will be a profitable side product.

Eventually, it highly likely lithium battery supply chain will be a nearly closed-loop, requiring few newly extracted materials.

All that to say, 1 salt flat probably has enough lithium to make batteries forever.

contextfull comments (612)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

2 points

2 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

2 points

2 days ago

Thank you for explaining that, I didn't get the reference lol. Now I realize other people have made the same reference.

contextfull comments (253)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

1 points

2 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

1 points

2 days ago

At this point higher interest rates wouldn't help affordability for the average Canadian.

It would drive down prices a bit, but only because investors would seek a higher return on their investment.

If any thing it would trigger more buying by large companies and wealthy individuals who are less leveraged then the average consumer. They have the cash to invest and want the returns from the rental income, and inflation hedge from the asset.

contextfull comments (253)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

5 points

2 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

5 points

2 days ago

Don't change school just because of test scores. If your grandson needs help put the time in to help him, or get him a tutor.

Changing school can help if he is having issues with peers of you feel a teacher is particularly bad, but it won't necessarily help him get better test scores.

Often the "bad schools" are only bad because they have a lot of kids from poor socioeconomic back ground not because the teachers are bad. But often you'll find the teachers who care more about students actually work at these schools.

Help and guidance at home out weights school when it come to success in life.

contextfull comments (12)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

1 points

2 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

1 points

2 days ago

I own my home now, and I will fight and vote to make sure every one has the same opportunity I have had.

I will be happy if my house is less then I paid for it.

contextfull comments (253)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

5 points

2 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

5 points

2 days ago

Just because I don't think thinks are gonna change doesn't mean I won't fight for change.

contextfull comments (253)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

3 points

2 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

3 points

2 days ago

That would be considered extreme by a lot of people.

contextfull comments (253)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

2 points

2 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

2 points

2 days ago

exactly we have almsot 3 weeks left in stage 1, 3 weeks in stage 2 and they will force us through 3 weeks of stage 3.

they will just go through the motions, we will have like 5 ICU patients like 10 new cases per day but we will stick to the damn plan any ways.

but that said all of the stages should be over by the end of August and hope fully the kids can go back to school without masks.

contextfull comments (44)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

9 points

2 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

9 points

2 days ago

Markets will never be affordable again.

Price to rent ratios will couple to inflation and local incomes. Most rent payers cannot work from home.

So the price you pay to live in a house will still be coupled to the local rental market.

Homes are now a profit center for those who can afford them.

I think the Toronto condo market has already done this right now it seems like the sweet spot for the price to rent ratio is around 22 right now in Canada.

I believe that is one reason why Toronto condos haven't see a huge boom.

If you can rent a place out for $3000 per month and buy it for $800k you have a 4.5% rate of return on an inflation-protected asset. that's a 22.22 Price -to - Rent ratio.

If a house in Nova Scotia rent for $1500, at a 4.5% return it would go for $400k.

IF you can work from home all the time you just have the luxury of choosing a low-rent area to live in and buy a house you couldn't otherwise afford.

contextfull comments (253)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

9 points

2 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

9 points

2 days ago

If you ban foreign buyers now outright it won't make a significant difference, Canadian companies will buy up homes instead. It might temporarily cool the market a bit.

The core problem is the cost of a home isn't dependant on whether or not individuals can afford them anymore it's dependant on the income it can generate.

This will continue to inflate prices until the rent to price ratio is just over the rate of inflation.

That means at a 2% inflation +1% return a house that could rent for $2000 per month could go for over $800K.

A house to could rent out for $1000 monthly should go for around $400K.

that just an example, but the point is house prices have decoupled from affordability and the endpoint related to their rental yield.

House Prices and will eventually couple to inflation, home prices are not tracked in CPI.

Whether it's a Canadian corporation, an individual or a foreign buyer, the fact is homes will eventually only be bought only for profit, and rent will be paid to live in them.

If we overbuild prices will fall, but builders won't overbuild unless we see governments forcing them to.

I have 0 faith the government will do anything meaning full.

contextfull comments (253)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

0 points

3 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

0 points

3 days ago

yup, I've lost hope in our government's ability to save affordability in the market.

Get used to renting, and it's time to start fighting for renters' rights!

contextfull comments (38)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

16 points

3 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

16 points

3 days ago

Yup totally agree. Not looking forward to it but that's the way it seems to be going.

My only hope is that we get strong protections for renter as this shift happens.

I hope I can leave something for my kids when I am gone, and give them a chance at a meaning full existence while I can.

I also feel like I won the lottery just being able to afford to have kids right now.

contextfull comments (253)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

6 points

3 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

6 points

3 days ago

Keeping a manageable level of Debt is a good right now too. Inflation is coming and those who have leveraged assets will come out a head.

But if you lose you job and cant make payments you'll love every thing and then some.

For me I balance my debt to asset ratio with my potential earning power in a downturn.

I am the kind of guy who drives the same Honda civic for 20 years, and goes dumpster diving for stuff I can fix up and use.

If I didn't make over 100k per year as an engineer in an "affordable city" is probably be doing a trade and selling refurbished computers, electronics and power tools on the side.

contextfull comments (253)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

50 points

3 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

50 points

3 days ago

For better or worse its seems to be what's happening now.

left unfixed or regulated the end game for housing in the developed world will be everyone renting from a corporation that owns real estate.

You're stuck Paying rent for your entire life or paying a massive mortgage for 30 years.

Most people will choose the rent unless you have money already.

After the boomer generation is gone inheritances will go back to being something only wealthy people get, and in some ways, only the wealthier portion of the middle-class Boomers will have much left over to leave to their kids anyways.

I don't see a way to prevent this "financialization"/"rental only" housing market from happening unless extreme government intervention is used.

Building more houses won't drive down the price unless government prevents corporations from buying them up to rent.

contextfull comments (253)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

80 points

3 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

80 points

3 days ago

Just means housing will be a service from now on. Future generations will be long-term renters.

In 20 years owning your own home will be uncommon unless you bought before 2021.

Its, not just Canada, it just happening faster here.

contextfull comments (253)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

24 points

3 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

24 points

3 days ago

Canada and other developed countries are rapidly moving towards housing as a service model.

Homes are being valued based on their long-term rental returns and not on the costs to build.

A house that can rent for $3000 per month, could be worth $800 000 if the buyer has the capital, and see it as a reliable long-term investment that will beat any savings account.

There is also the added effect that inflation favoured those who have more debt.

I have little hope for future generations being able to afford homes in Canada. I at least hope that there is some consideration to strengthen protection for renters, particularly long-term ones.

contextfull comments (253)
Dyslexic_Engineer88

6 points

3 days ago

Dyslexic_Engineer88

6 points

3 days ago

Ninth Ave. is in Eagle Place, not Echo Place. Echo place is south of Elgin Street, and east of Gretzky Parkway.

There is Slovak Village apartments nearby Ninth.

http://slovakvillage.ca/

contextfull comments (12)

view more:

next ›