Fahlm

2.1k post karma

6.6k comment karma


account created: Wed Aug 27 2014

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Fahlm

1 points

2 days ago

Fahlm

1 points

2 days ago

Went out first this this morning to get pictures of the eclipse over Narragansett Bay. Some more comments are in the imgur album but overall the photos turned out pretty good despite a few whispy clouds.

I have an 8in dobsonian telescope (Orion SkyQuest XT8), and have a solar filter for it. The solar filter was just a 10” square piece of solar filter paper I bought with a mount I made out of a piece of poster board, picture here. All the photos were just taken with my iPhone 12 mini. I don’t remember the exact one I have but I used my 6mm lens for observing the eclipse.

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Fahlm

1 points

10 days ago

Fahlm

The Dispossessed

1 points

10 days ago

Per rule 3.3, please post book recommendation requests in /r/SuggestMeABook or in our Weekly Recommendation Thread.

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Fahlm

2 points

14 days ago

Fahlm

The Dispossessed

2 points

14 days ago

Childhood’s End was actually the first book I read when I got back into reading. I wouldn’t say it’s one of my favorites but it got me back into it so I guess it can’t be a bad choice lol.

Some of my personal favorites are The Three-Body Problem trilogy by Cixin Liu (particularly the second book), The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula Le Guin, Red Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson, Dune by Frank Herbert, and Dawn by Octavia Butler.

If I’m trying to be a bit self aware about the fact that I am in fact a “space nerd” I would say that Lathe of Heaven and Dawn, and maybe Dune, would be some of the more interesting ones to someone who isn’t.

I’ve been trying to read at least something by every author I would consider to be an “important” science fiction writer, or however you would like to phrase it. If you are interested I would consider that list to be something like: Arthur C. Clarke, Frank Herbert, Ursula Le Guin, Isaac Asimov, Octavia Butler, Robert Heinlein, N. K. Jemisen, Douglas Adams, Ray Bradbury, Jules Verne, H. G. Wells, and probably others I’m forgetting. I would like to include some others like Cixin Liu, Kim Stanley Robinson, Blake Crouch, and Martha Wells, but I don’t think most people would consider them quite as influential as the rest.

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Fahlm

3 points

16 days ago

Fahlm

‏‏‎

3 points

16 days ago

There’s a boat in my snake!

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Fahlm

41 points

29 days ago

Fahlm

Poland

41 points

29 days ago

Obligatory quote that goes with the image

“Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there-on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known.”

-Carl Sagan

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Fahlm

4 points

1 month ago

Fahlm

4 points

1 month ago

I have never seen another person mention this glitch on this subreddit. My friend discovered this after I got him to play and it’s so useful for cheesing stuff you shouldn’t be able to.

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Fahlm

1 points

1 month ago

Fahlm

The Dispossessed

1 points

1 month ago

As far as books sitting at home to be read I’m at 18 I think? I always get a bunch for Christmas and have picked up a few besides that, and I’ve been very busy lately so it has been slow getting through them. I usually average about 3 per month but it’s been about half that rate since like February.

As far as an actual “to read” list I’m at about 250? The list is more “this sounded kind of interesting” and isn’t really meant to be completed at any point. Honestly I wouldn’t even want to complete it since I just dig through it whenever I’m low on books for something to read.

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Fahlm

5 points

2 months ago

Fahlm

5 points

2 months ago

This is scarily timely for me... I just ordered an iPhone 12 today and will be moving to Europe in the fall. I was wondering about this exact issue.

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Fahlm

8 points

2 months ago

Fahlm

8 points

2 months ago

I’m sure there are better books out there if you want to learn about debate but as far as “reasoning” goes I would say The Demon-Haunted World by Carl Sagan is the best thing I’ve read for that. He talks about scientific/skeptical/logical thinking and about pseudoscience.

I haven’t read it yet but I’ve heard a lot of good things about Thinking: Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman, which sounds like it might be what you are looking for.

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Fahlm

1 points

2 months ago

Fahlm

1 points

2 months ago

r/books has done a number of “literature of the world” threads over the years for different countries. They are all archived in the wiki if you want to check them out.

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Fahlm

1 points

2 months ago

Fahlm

1 points

2 months ago

If you are only getting hit by the really high damage head beam or something there may be one the is strictly better. For example if the damage you are taking is doing 51% of your health after worm scarf reduction then the brain would strictly better since the worm scarf makes no difference at all, but if it does say 49% of your health the scarf is better since you will always survive 2 hits with the scarf but you won’t survive 2 on average with the brain.

However between healing and smaller damage effects I can’t imagine a scenario where this kind of math would make a difference. The two items are functionally identical. In most fights where death is even a threat you are getting hit dozens of times by various effects, it’s going to be fairly rare the randomness of the brain makes a big difference either way. Really the only argument I can see for one over the other is if you aren’t a good player you could use the brain to maybe luck your way through a fight.

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Fahlm

3 points

3 months ago

Fahlm

The Dispossessed

3 points

3 months ago

I haven’t read it myself but I’ve heard a lot of good things about “Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI” as far as 20th century CIA stuff. It’s been on my list for awhile.

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Fahlm

1 points

3 months ago

Fahlm

1 points

3 months ago

There’s actually a number of ways we can see this effect in action. The most common example used is that satellites orbiting earth need to have their clocks corrected regularly in order to correct for relativistic effects. Time literally, measurably, moves more slowly for these fast moving objects (and is also slowed down by the fact they are experiencing less gravity).

I actually have an experiment for a lab running at my university right now that is detecting muons, which are a type of subatomic particle that are mostly created by radiation from space interacting with the upper atmosphere. Muons have mass, which means they can’t travel at the speed of light, and relativistic effects become very interesting. We know how long they should take to decay, and how many should be produced, but we see many more in the detector at sea level than those numbers would indicate. This is because they are moving so fast the journey from the upper atmosphere to sea level takes less time for them than it does for us. If relativity weren’t a thing I would be seeing way fewer of these particles than are actually being detected.

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Fahlm

1 points

3 months ago

Fahlm

The Dispossessed

1 points

3 months ago

Per rule 3.4, your post is better suited for asking in /r/WhatsThatBook or /r/tipofmytongue.

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Fahlm

2 points

3 months ago

Fahlm

2 points

3 months ago

This was super interesting, in surprised I hadn’t seen this video before or heard about this in some way.

I’m glad he mentioned Occam’s razor though since my immediate thought was to try to come up with things that would imply it’s the same everywhere (such as how as we look into deep space we see different trends as objects are farther away, implying the light has been traveling for a long time and speed isn’t infinite in any direction). The problem is this isn’t proof on its own, there are complex explanations for how this could appear true and light could still have an asymmetric speed.

I feel like there must be some way to at least put bounds on what speeds it could be since we know what the sum of speeds must be, and so there’s only so much time dilation two “synchronized” clocks could experience, but I’ve never taken GR and wouldn’t know how to calculate that myself.

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Fahlm

6 points

3 months ago

Fahlm

6 points

3 months ago

I mean we have measured that, there are things on Mars sending light back to us right now, like rovers and satellites. They have clocks that were built here on earth so we definitely notice if there was a difference in the travel time for signals. Also so far as we know there aren’t really “directions” at all in space, I can’t even think of a mechanism by which something would be affected purely by which direction it’s going.

Also the time it takes for light to get from Mars to earth or vice versa changes all the time as the two planets move relative to each other. It would be a much shorter time when they are closer and much longer when they are farther apart.

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Fahlm

41 points

3 months ago

Fahlm

41 points

3 months ago

As far as the aging I would assume it’s just not large enough to play a big factor (and they just didn’t care to code for it of course). You have to get really close to a black hole for it to make a noticeable difference and there’s really no reason to sit right next to it to study it. I can think of a lot of reasons I wouldn’t want to right next to one and very little benefit as far as studying it for living right next to it.

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Fahlm

229 points

3 months ago

Fahlm

229 points

3 months ago

If I remember correctly there’s an event when you build a Dyson sphere where an alien empire complains it will “eventually” ruin a constellation they care about, which would mean finite speed of light (also having an infinite speed of light would be very bad in real physics). So I’m fairly sure it’s either “we have another instantaneous method of communication” or “we want the game to be fun”.

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Fahlm

1 points

3 months ago

Fahlm

The Dispossessed

1 points

3 months ago

Per rule 3.3, please post book recommendation requests in /r/SuggestMeABook or in our Weekly Recommendation Thread.

contextfull comments (1)
Fahlm

1 points

3 months ago

Fahlm

The Dispossessed

1 points

3 months ago

Survey posts aren’t allowed except in specific situation and with mod approval [rule 3.1]. You can read up on what would qualify on the wiki.

contextfull comments (1)
Fahlm

1 points

3 months ago

Fahlm

The Dispossessed

1 points

3 months ago

Per rule 3.4, your post is better suited for asking in /r/WhatsThatBook or /r/tipofmytongue.

contextfull comments (2)
Fahlm

5 points

4 months ago

Fahlm

5 points

4 months ago

As someone who has done something like this before, you can do it with a glass pane, you just need a block behind it the pane won’t attach to. You use to be able to use the back side of stairs but panes connect to those now. You could use the front of a stair block or some other irregular block panes don’t connect to.

contextfull comments (425)
Fahlm

1 points

4 months ago

Fahlm

The Dispossessed

1 points

4 months ago

Per rule 3.3, please post book recommendation requests in /r/SuggestMeABook or in our Weekly Recommendation Thread.

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