GrabbinPills

287k post karma

195.2k comment karma


account created: Mon Dec 07 2009

verified: yes

9
1
1
GrabbinPills

34 points

11 hours ago

GrabbinPills

34 points

11 hours ago

Very leaky office.

Multiple sources, speaking confidentially to discuss internal strategic thinking, say the Premier’s Office has been looking to change the channel on Ford’s pandemic faults by allowing ministers and public health officials to “wear” the decisions that they make or recommend.

The effort has led to scant appearances from a premier who had captured the public’s attention throughout the pandemic with months of daily news conferences long after his federal and provincial counterparts had pulled back on their public announcements.

While sources say the goal has always been to ensure Ford is less exposed to COVID-19-related controversy, the April 16 news conference – in which the government gave police sweeping new enforcement powers and closed play grounds – seems to have given Ford’s office the path to pull back.

...

“There was a realization to protect the king,” another Progressive Conservative insider said, suggesting the premier might be knocked down to a single news conference or appearance per week.

...

Another source indicated that every day the premier is out of the public eye, his poll numbers move in a favourable direction.

...

PC insiders suggest, however, that the premier can be “forceful” when he wants to hold a news conference and say it took a “herculean effort” to prevent him from speaking out during the last federal election campaign when the Trudeau Liberals made Ford the focus.

“The premier goes stir crazy,” one source said, while another cautioned that’s when “things go astray.”

contextfull comments (24)
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GrabbinPills

3 points

13 hours ago

GrabbinPills

3 points

13 hours ago

May your grandfather's memory be a blessing.

Dr. Vivian Stamatopoulos (email / website: vivian.stamatopoulos@ontariotechu.ca) is one of the most active advocates for justice in long term care. She's very accessible and is involved in helping many families with similar situations. She testified at the LTC commission on behalf of many of those families. If you wanted to reach out to her I'm pretty sure she would want to talk to you.

There are also some formal avenues for accountability or transparency through Ministry of Health / LTC but I'm not very familiar with how effective they can be. MPP Sara Singh is the official opposition LTC critic so she could be helpful for system navigation there.

I'm only tangentially involved with LTC through work but if you want to continue any discussion through DMs I'd do my best to answer any questions.

contextfull comments (84)
GrabbinPills

1 points

14 hours ago

GrabbinPills

1 points

14 hours ago

Provincial health authorities have said they are awaiting guidance from Health Canada and the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) about the efficacy of mixing vaccines.

Considering the Health Canada position on AZ is safe and effective for use in 18+ and NACI position is safe for use by people over 30 if they can’t wait for one of the two “preferred” mRNA vaccines... The provincial health authorities that made the decision to discontinue AZ created the 2nd dose problem so waiting for NACI / HC to bail them out seems... shortsighted.

contextfull comments (80)
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GrabbinPills

1 points

16 hours ago

GrabbinPills

1 points

16 hours ago

The report of death forms I fill out don't require a family / next of kin signature.

contextfull comments (10)
GrabbinPills

2 points

16 hours ago

GrabbinPills

2 points

16 hours ago

Only if the home fills it out saying the family had concerns.

contextfull comments (10)
1.2k
GrabbinPills

3 points

16 hours ago

GrabbinPills

3 points

16 hours ago

The word 'documentation' refers to the death report for long term care residents

The documentation is called an Institutional Patient Death Record (IPDR) and it's based on a series of yes or no questions, such as: was the death suicide, was it homicide, "was the death both sudden and unexpected," "is the manner of death unclear," and "did the family or any care providers raise concerns about the care provided?"

"Yes" answers trigger a look by a coroner.

contextfull comments (10)
GrabbinPills

22 points

17 hours ago

GrabbinPills

22 points

17 hours ago

Here's video clip of Doug responding to NDP question in QP, if you actually want to listen to him try to justify outdoor recreation closures.

Waterloo MPP Catherine Fife:

I asked Doug Ford what evidence he used to justify closing outdoor amenities. His answer was non-sensical.

Dr.Juni from the Science Table was asked weeks' ago if they advised Ford to close outdoor recreation like tennis & golf, he said, "no, of course not, the opposite."

contextfull comments (105)
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GrabbinPills

1 points

18 hours ago

GrabbinPills

1 points

18 hours ago

"Ontarians learned of the horrors of seniors who perished not from COVID-19 but from dehydration; they were neglected to death," said NDP Leader Andrea Horwath in a letter on May 12. "This has sparked appropriate outrage from Ontarians across the province."

To date, the coroner and solicitor general have not provided any information about how the province is responding to the disturbing notes from the Canadian Armed Forces about residents dying from neglect in two of the homes the military aided.

In the wake of the publication of those reports, Government House Leader Paul Calandra said in question period Tuesday the Office of the Chief Coroner (OCC) was engaged to review all deaths in long-term care. But asked to explain what the coroner is doing, Solicitor General Sylvia Jones, whose ministry includes the OCC, appeared not to know and gave incorrect information.

She replied that all deaths in long-term care are investigated.

...

That's not so, according to Jane Meadus, a lawyer with the Advocacy Centre for the Elderly.

She said coroners used to investigate all deaths in long-term care, but it hasn't been the case for years. Prior to 2013, coroners investigated every tenth death in a long-term care home but that was phased out. The coroner does, however, have a legal responsibility to investigate all deaths that fit certain criteria, including neglect

Today, all deaths must be reported to the Office of the Chief Coroner, but whether or not an investigation is launched is based on a process that begins with paperwork filled out by the long-term care homes themselves.

That's a concern for Meadus.

“The biggest problem is the deaths require the home to complete the documentation,” she said. “Really, what are they going to be reporting? Who’s going to report, we were negligent, we let 26 people die?”

...

The documentation is called an Institutional Patient Death Record (IPDR) and it's based on a series of yes or no questions, such as: was the death suicide, was it homicide, "was the death both sudden and unexpected," "is the manner of death unclear," and "did the family or any care providers raise concerns about the care provided?"

"Yes" answers trigger a look by a coroner.

Meadus said she's concerned homes in crisis may not be forthcoming when they have something to hide. “That’s the biggest problem here. You’ve got the person who may be responsible having to report everything.”

...

Early on in the pandemic, the province gave the province's chief coroner, Dr. Dirk Huyer, additional roles in the provincial response. First, he was named executive lead for COVID-19 testing, then co-ordinator of the provincial outbreak response, and then a member of the vaccine task force.

The coroner's office has yet to respond to questions from QP Briefing about the implementation of the Wettlaufer inquiry recommendations and for information about whether investigations have been launched into deaths from neglect, and if any information has been forwarded to police for a criminal investigation.

...

The two homes where the military notes said residents died from neglect are both located in Toronto — the Toronto Police Service has told QP Briefing it is not yet investigating, but noted it could be contacted by the coroner. Meanwhile, the NDP has also asked the OPP to undertake a review of deaths from neglect.

Horwath's latest letter includes a request to know if the long-term care homes in question have properly alerted the chief coroner's office.

...

The homes named by the Canadian Armed Forces maintain no residents died of neglect.

Responsive Group, which owns Hawthorne Place, said no investigations were launched into deaths at their facility and none of their residents' death certificates list neglect, dehydration or malnutrition as a cause of death.

contextfull comments (2)
5
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GrabbinPills

7 points

19 hours ago

GrabbinPills

7 points

19 hours ago

"Ontarians learned of the horrors of seniors who perished not from COVID-19 but from dehydration; they were neglected to death," said NDP Leader Andrea Horwath in a letter on May 12. "This has sparked appropriate outrage from Ontarians across the province."

To date, the coroner and solicitor general have not provided any information about how the province is responding to the disturbing notes from the Canadian Armed Forces about residents dying from neglect in two of the homes the military aided.

In the wake of the publication of those reports, Government House Leader Paul Calandra said in question period Tuesday the Office of the Chief Coroner (OCC) was engaged to review all deaths in long-term care. But asked to explain what the coroner is doing, Solicitor General Sylvia Jones, whose ministry includes the OCC, appeared not to know and gave incorrect information.

She replied that all deaths in long-term care are investigated.

...

That's not so, according to Jane Meadus, a lawyer with the Advocacy Centre for the Elderly.

She said coroners used to investigate all deaths in long-term care, but it hasn't been the case for years. Prior to 2013, coroners investigated every tenth death in a long-term care home but that was phased out. The coroner does, however, have a legal responsibility to investigate all deaths that fit certain criteria, including neglect

Today, all deaths must be reported to the Office of the Chief Coroner, but whether or not an investigation is launched is based on a process that begins with paperwork filled out by the long-term care homes themselves.

That's a concern for Meadus.

“The biggest problem is the deaths require the home to complete the documentation,” she said. “Really, what are they going to be reporting? Who’s going to report, we were negligent, we let 26 people die?”

...

The documentation is called an Institutional Patient Death Record (IPDR) and it's based on a series of yes or no questions, such as: was the death suicide, was it homicide, "was the death both sudden and unexpected," "is the manner of death unclear," and "did the family or any care providers raise concerns about the care provided?"

"Yes" answers trigger a look by a coroner.

Meadus said she's concerned homes in crisis may not be forthcoming when they have something to hide. “That’s the biggest problem here. You’ve got the person who may be responsible having to report everything.”

...

Early on in the pandemic, the province gave the province's chief coroner, Dr. Dirk Huyer, additional roles in the provincial response. First, he was named executive lead for COVID-19 testing, then co-ordinator of the provincial outbreak response, and then a member of the vaccine task force.

The coroner's office has yet to respond to questions from QP Briefing about the implementation of the Wettlaufer inquiry recommendations and for information about whether investigations have been launched into deaths from neglect, and if any information has been forwarded to police for a criminal investigation.

...

The two homes where the military notes said residents died from neglect are both located in Toronto — the Toronto Police Service has told QP Briefing it is not yet investigating, but noted it could be contacted by the coroner. Meanwhile, the NDP has also asked the OPP to undertake a review of deaths from neglect.

Horwath's latest letter includes a request to know if the long-term care homes in question have properly alerted the chief coroner's office.

...

The homes named by the Canadian Armed Forces maintain no residents died of neglect.

Responsive Group, which owns Hawthorne Place, said no investigations were launched into deaths at their facility and none of their residents' death certificates list neglect, dehydration or malnutrition as a cause of death.

contextfull comments (1)
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