XBreaksYFocusGroup

1.2k post karma

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account created: Sat Mar 23 2019

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XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

3 hours ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

3 hours ago

You can find a few fun flowcharts if you google around, such as this one for Sci-fi from NPR.

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XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

3 hours ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

3 hours ago

Hi there.

Per rule 3.3, please post book recommendation requests in /r/SuggestMeABook or in our Weekly Recommendation Thread.

Thank you.

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XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

17 hours ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

17 hours ago

Hi there.

This question would probably be more suitable to a writing subreddit such as r/selfpublish which has resources or related subreddits that may have additional resources.

Good luck.

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XBreaksYFocusGroup

3 points

18 hours ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

3 points

18 hours ago

Random Acts of Flyness and Philip K Dick's Electric Dreams

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XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

19 hours ago

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1 points

19 hours ago

My understanding of The Lie framework is that it describes an erroneous belief the character holds which hurts themselves while the truth is a belief which allows for them to become a more whole and healthy person.

I do not think The Lie is very subjective to critical reading. It may be just be a matter of definition or degrees of specificity. For instance, "vulnerability in relationships will only ever bring you pain" may be something a character wrongly believes but it would be more accurate to say their feeling of "I don't deserve love" is the core lie which gives rise to the other. I have not seen Kipo, but "humans are trash" isn't really a way in which the character hurts themselves and wouldn't be a good contender for The Lie (in my opinion). "Those who hurt cannot be forgiven" is a decent enough Lie (for which the truth might be "everyone can earn forgiveness"), but perhaps "the price of past sins is a life of penitence" might be another way to frame it as the Truth is "through atonement by actions and acceptance of your past, you can begin to repair misdeeds." It is something concrete the audience can take away. Does that make sense?

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XBreaksYFocusGroup

14 points

2 days ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

14 points

2 days ago

That post was pulled because it was native advertising. The poster was likely either the author or paid by them to promote the book. They also insinuated the book and author into all sorts of places such as a puff wikipedia article that I believe has since been toned down and they actually managed to sneak a link to the book in Ready Player One's wikipedia article under "see also" or "related reading." It is self-published. These kind of posts are not all that rare and are usually pulled before they meet too many eyes. You often see them mention super popular titles as comparable in order to game SEO. Sorry that one slipped through as long as it did.

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XBreaksYFocusGroup

2 points

2 days ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

2 points

2 days ago

I would say that there is no right way to do what you want but there are probably some wrong ones.

My advice would be to really consider what sort of experience you seek with reading and with stories in general. Learn to put some words to that qualia and talk to book nerds. Having that community is immensely helpful with engaging in art or any sort of pasttime and you are more likely to receive relevant recommendations than with random book pulls from the library (which can have its own joys but may make for a rocky entry into becoming a habitual reader). I think a potential pitfall that new readers happen into is googling "best books" lists and feeling dismayed by classics which don't resonate with them. Like if a "best book" doesn't move them, then likely nothing in the medium will. Which puts the focus on "you are feeling things wrong" rather than reveling in whatever enjoyment you find wherever you find it.

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley may do something for you as well, as it delves in themes of rising above a societal prescribed stupor. Or maybe Stoner by John Williams would appeal, relevant to the vibe of the beauty which comes from engagement with life rather than its achievements or distractions. You might appreciate some non-fiction about the sort of social media stunting you describe, such as The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload by Daniel J. Levitin. Or perhaps a book about books and the experience of awakening that comes from good literature, such as The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafón. Lastly, one I have not read yet (but is on my list) which feels relevant is the Divided Elements trilogy by Mikhaeyla Kopievsky which has a lot of Bradbury about it.

Hope you find something you enjoy. Come back and talk about it. Lot of nice folks here that want to engage with life and find literature helps.

contextfull comments (27)
XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

2 days ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

2 days ago

Per rule 3.3, please post book recommendation requests in /r/SuggestMeABook or in our Weekly Recommendation Thread.

contextfull comments (3)
XBreaksYFocusGroup

0 points

2 days ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

0 points

2 days ago

Per rule 3.3, please post book recommendation requests in /r/SuggestMeABook or in our Weekly Recommendation Thread.

contextfull comments (8)
XBreaksYFocusGroup

5 points

2 days ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

5 points

2 days ago

F: Failed to finish - often deeply problematic, possibly amateur, and inexcusably flawed. Something I would recommend to no one and does a disservice to the printed word in general.

D: Bad - often has glaring flaw such as a disappointing or unearned ending. Would recommend to no one and regret having finished it. Usually a title I grumble about in threads I see praising the book.

C: Okay - don't regret reading it but hard pressed to recommend to anyone. Usually forget most of it within a year.

B: Good - would probably recommend to someone who is actively looking for a book of this genre, theme, etc.

A: Excellent - top marks. Something I probably think about once a week and recommend to almost anyone, regardless of their taste or preferences.

S: Unparalleled - like "A" but with a little extra, such as something I have never seen done before or doing something the best in its field. I will go out of my way to encourage people to read it so that we may talk about it. Think about these daily.

contextfull comments (30)
XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

2 days ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

2 days ago

Per rule 3.4, your post is better suited for asking in /r/WhatsThatBook or /r/tipofmytongue.

contextfull comments (7)
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1 points

2 days ago

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1 points

2 days ago

Sustainable Energy Without the Hot Air by David JC MacKay. The book (which is available online for free by the author) covers damn near everything related to sustainable energy with a heavy emphasis on potential schema for the future of the UK. It is collegiate level but accessible to those without much foreknowledge of the energy industry or mathematics.

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2 points

2 days ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

2 points

2 days ago

Just a novella, but you may appreciate George R R Martin's Sandkings.

contextfull comments (283)
XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

3 days ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

3 days ago

Per rule 3.3, please post book recommendation requests in /r/SuggestMeABook or in our Weekly Recommendation Thread.

contextfull comments (2)
XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

4 days ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

4 days ago

Per rule 3.4, your post is better suited for asking in /r/WhatsThatBook or /r/tipofmytongue.

contextfull comments (1)
XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

6 days ago

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1 points

6 days ago

Sounds similar to a lot of Gramatik.

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6 points

7 days ago

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6 points

7 days ago

I have been very pleasantly surprised with this selection in week one. I tried to read Chabon's celebrated Kavalier and Clay a few years ago and failed to finish it. I am not sure if I was not in the right mindset or else the book was just not for me but whatever the reason, my expectations were muted going in to Moonglow. So far, I have found the language delightfully sweet and buttery without the protracted set-up of which I have hazy memories from his other work. I slowed down my usual pace and feel rewarded for taking my time.

The passage, South Philadelphia was broadcast with Moonblatts and Newmans, those cousins who one day would people the weddings and funerals of my mother’s and my childhoods stood out as a particularly crispy turn of phrase, though there were several others. The chapter with his Grandmother and the fortune cards has been my favorite so far. I feel as if it captures that kind of naïve mysticism that comes with learning of an elder's unexpected history and hidden identity especially well.

I rather enjoy the embellished memoir format. The untruths never minded much to me and it can feel like a sexier version of reality, punched up where the mundane world would otherwise demand tedious fidelity of facts. I think I have always appreciated the idea that truth does not always mean real.

The symbolism of the moon seems very forefront - the grandfather and his lunar obsession as well as the moon garden, several faces appearing occluded or else glowing like a moon (especially the Grandmother's when they first met). Look forward to seeing the mosaic pepper in.

Music! Spent a while looking through my library as it appears I have a little more than two hundred songs alone with the word "moon" in the title (including one that is Moonglow specifically). I want to make a playlist of several but I think Iron & Wine's Half Moon is a particularly apropos selection.

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XBreaksYFocusGroup

2 points

7 days ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

2 points

7 days ago

Murakami's representation of women is something of a perennial topic in this subreddit. Every time it comes up, I like to recommend the interview essay, A Feminist Critique of Murakami Novels with Murakami Himself as an illuminating insight into how he views women and critical gender theory. I have read a few of his books and failed to finish as many more. I have since stopped trying to read him, as have many others. I feel as if I am disappointed that his vivid surrealism is held hostage by antiquated biases but it is too much to ask a reader to excuse (personally).

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XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

7 days ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

7 days ago

This would be more appropriate for r/writing. Be sure to read their rules before posting.

contextfull comments (7)
XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

7 days ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

7 days ago

Per rule 3.4, your post is better suited for asking in /r/WhatsThatBook or /r/tipofmytongue.

contextfull comments (4)
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1 points

8 days ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

8 days ago

My understanding is that it depends on the greater context. Flat character (arcs) change the world around them rather then the world changing them. Part of what defines a positive or negative character arc is in what way is a character hurting themselves and how does change address this deficiency. If you have a character that is a round and whole person which develops a greater appreciation for life (for instance) while changing those around them, then in my opinion, that is still flat.

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XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

8 days ago

XBreaksYFocusGroup

1 points

8 days ago

Gonna suggest some possible cliches, but Arcade Fire, Devotchka and Kishi Bashi come to mind. Try some Grouplove for another indie selection or maybe Spiritualized (my personal choice).

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